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Archive for August, 2012

Timeline

Each time I start a year, I have already compiled a list, months ago with about 6000 entered of what happened from 1788 to 1837. My first step now (It took several trials to get this down to a science) is to cut out the specific year I will work on and paste it into its own spreadsheet to work with. When I worked on the entire spreadsheet, sometimes inserting a line, with all the graphics I had begun to place, took a long time. Working on each year alone, is a lot faster.

With the year separated out, I now turn to my book sources,

The Timetables of History by Grun and Stein1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-31-08-03.jpg

Chronology of CULTURE by Paxton and Fairfield

1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-31-08-03.jpg What Happened When by Carruth.

PastedGraphic-2012-08-31-08-03.jpg, History of the World. A beautiful Dorling Kindersley book.

I now and diligently look through each of these to find entries that I did not come across on the internet, and other printed lists. It is possible that there are places that have more listings for each year. I have not found them. And when you go to the Timelines at the Regency Assembly Press page, there you will see all the graphical references as well. Something that I did not find anywhere else.

Here is the start of 1812:

Year Month Day Event
1812 Jan 23 A 2nd major earthquake shook New Madrid, Missouri.
1812 January January: Wellington captures Ciudad Rodrigo.
1812 Feb 5 Franz Schneider (74), composer, died.
1812 Feb 7 A 3rd major earthquake shook New Madrid, Missouri, and for a few hours reversed the course of the Mississippi River. [see Dec 15-16, 1811, Jan 23, 1912]
1812 Feb 7 Charles Dickens, English novelist, was born in Portsmouth, England. His stories reflected life in Victorian England. In his novel “Dombey & Son,” Dickens confronted the subject of money, and its use as a measure of success. His work also included “Master Humphrey’s Clock,” published in installments like most of his novels. The closing line of A Christmas Carol: “And so, as Tiny Tim observed, God Bless Us, Every One!” Some of his more famous novels include “Oliver Twist” and “A Tale of Two Cities.”
1812 Feb 7 Lord Byron made his maiden speech in House of Lords.
1812 Feb 9 Franz Anton Hoffmeister (57), composer, died.
1812 Feb 11 Alexander Hamilton Stephens (d.1883), Vice Pres (Confederacy), was born near Crawfordville, Georgia. Stephens, who served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1843 to 1859, was a delegate at the Montgomery meeting that formed a new union of the seceded states. He was elected vice president to Jefferson Davis on February 9, 1861. Stephens was later elected governor of Georgia in 1882 but died after serving just a few months.
1812 Feb 11 Massachusetts Gov. Elbridge Gerry signed a re-districting law  that favored his party, giving rise to the term “gerrymandering.” His district was shaped like a salamander.
1812 Feb 16 Henry Wilson, 18th U.S. Vice President (Grant 1873-1875), was born. 
1812 February February: Poet Lord Byron gives his first address as a member of the House of Lords, in defense of Luddite violence against Industrialism in his home county of Nottinghamshire. Despite his eloquence, Parliament passes the Frame Breaking Act, which permits the death sentence for anyone convicted of destroying machinery.
1812 February February: Viscount Wellington is made Earl of Wellington for his service in the Peninsula.
1812 Mar 6 Aaron Lufkin Dennison, father of American watch making, was born.
1812 Mar 9 Swedish Pomerania was seized by Napoleon.
1812 Mar 11 Citizenship was granted to Prussian Jews.
1812 Mar 14 The US Congress authorized war bonds to finance War of 1812.
1812 Mar 19 Spanish Cortes passed a liberal constitution under a hereditary monarch.
1812 Mar 25 Alexander Herzen (d.1870), Russian author, was born. “Life has taught me to think, but thinking has not taught me how to live.”
1812 Mar 26 Earthquake destroyed 90% of Caracas; about 20,000 died.
1812 March March: The first two cantos of Lord Byron’s Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage are published.
1812 Apr 4 The territory of Orleans became the 18th state and later became known as Louisiana.
1812 Apr 15 Pierre-Etienne-Theodore Rousseau, painter, was born.
1812 Apr 20 George Clinton (73), the 4th vice president of the United States, died in Washington, becoming the first vice president to die while in office.
1812 Apr 26 Alfred Krupp, German arms merchant, was born.
1812 Apr 27 Friedrich von Flotow, composer (Martha), was born.
1812 Apr 30 Louisiana became the 18th state.
1812 April April: Gas Light and Coke Company is granted a charter to operate the first gas works in London (and the world).
1812 April April: Lord Byron begins his notorious affair with Lady Caroline Lamb.
1812 April April: Wellington captures Badajoz in one of the bloodiest battles of the Peninsular wars. Afterwards, the British Army participates in some of the worst atrocities of the war — looting, vandalizing, raping, and murdering civilians of the town for 3 days before order was restored. Wellington is outraged by the solders’ conduct, and a gallows is erected to punish offenders. A few men are flogged, but no one is hanged.
1812 May 7 Poet Robert Browning was born in London. His works include “The Piper of Hamelin” and “The Ring and the Book.”
1812 May 11 The Waltz was introduced into English ballrooms. Most observers considered it disgusting and immoral.
1812 May 11 British PM Spencer Perceval was shot by a bankrupt banker in the lobby of the House of Commons. Lord Liverpool (1770-1828) was asked to serve as PM of Britain and he served until 1827.
1812 May 13 Johann Matthias Sperger (62), composer, died.
1812 May 25 A series of coal mine explosions took place around the Felling Colliery in Durhamshire, England. 92 miners were killed. This prompted local clergymen to organize the Society for Preventing Accidents in Coal Mines.
1812 May May: British Prime Minister Spencer Perceval is assassinated.
1812 May May: The Treaty of Bucharest ends a 6-year war between Russia and the Ottoman Turks, who cede Bessarabia to Russia.
1812 May William Moorcroft, East India Co. head of 5,000 acre horse farm at Pusa, India, departed for Tibet in search of horses to improve his stock.
1812 12-Jun Prime Minister of the United Kingdom: Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool
1812 Jun 4 The Louisiana Territory was renamed the Missouri Territory.
1812 Jun 18 The War of 1812 began as the United States declared war against Great Britain and Ireland. The term “war hawk” was first used by John Randolph in reference to those Republicans who were pro-war in the years leading up to the War of 1812. These new types of Republicans, who espoused nationalism and expansionism, included Henry Clay and John C. Calhoun. Most of them came from the agrarian areas of the South and West. In 2004 Walter R. Borneman authored “1812: The War That Forged a Nation.”
1812 Jun 18 Ivan Goncharov, Russian novelist of the Russian realism school of thought, was born. He is best known for his book “Oblomov.”
1812 Jun 22 A pro-war mob destroyed Hanson’s newspaper office, four days after America’s declaration of war against Great Britain. Revered American Revolutionary cavalry hero Henry “Light-Horse Harry” Lee was nearly beaten to death by a mob in Baltimore. Lee came to the aide of an anti-war newspaper publisher in Baltimore, Alexander Contee Hanson, defending his right to freedom of speech. When Hanson returned to Baltimore five weeks later to resume publication, his office was again besieged by vigilantes. After a tense standoff through the night of July 27, Hanson and his supporters, including Lee, were taken to a local jail. Later the mob stormed the jail, severely beating those being held. Lee, father of Robert E. Lee, never fully recovered from injuries sustained in the beating and died in 1818.
1812 Jun 23 The church at Mission San Juan Bautista in California was dedicated.
1812 Jun 24 Napoleon crossed the Nieman River [in Lithuania] and invaded Russia. The French army under Napoleon crossed the Nemunas River near Kaunas. Prior to his march into Russia, Napoleon had taken land from Russia and returned it to Polish control in Warsaw. This assured him safe passage through Poland and Lithuania on his way to Russia. In 1824 the book “History of the Expedition to Russia, Undertaken by the Emperor Napoleon in the Year 1812” by Count de Segur, a general in Napoleon’s army, was first published. An English translation edited by Gerard Shelley was published in 1928.
1812 Jun 30 William Moorcroft, East India Co. head of 5,000 acre horse farm at Pusa, India, arrived in Tibet. He found no horses to improve his stock but learned of Russian presence.
1812 June June: Lord Liverpool becomes Britain’s new Prime Minister (a position he holds until 1827).
1812 June June: Napoleon’s invasion of Russia begins.
1812 June June: Sarah Siddons retires from the stage after her last performance as Lady Macbeth at the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden. She will continue to do occasional charity performances and private readings until her death in 1831.
1812 June June: The United States declares war on Britain over trade restraints and territory disputes (ie the War of 1812).
1812 Jul 12 United States forces led by General William Hull entered Canada during the War of 1812 against Britain. However, Hull retreated shortly thereafter to Detroit. Madison had called for 50,000 volunteers to invade Canada but only 5,000 signed up.
1812 Jul 18 Great Britain signed the Treaty of Orebro, making peace with Russia and Sweden.
1812 Jul 22 English troops under the Duke of Wellington defeated the French at the Battle of Salamanca in Spain.
1812 Jul British troops under the Duke of Wellington pillaged the Spanish town of Badajos. This prompted Wellington to call his troops “the scum of the earth.”
1812 July July: Wellington defeats Marshall Marmont at the Battle of Salamanca.
1812 Aug 12 British commander the Duke of Wellington occupied Madrid, Spain, forcing out Joseph Bonaparte.
1812 Aug 16 American General William Hull surrendered Detroit without resistance to a smaller British and Indian forces under General Isaac Brock.
1812 Aug 17 Napoleon Bonaparte’s army defeated the Russians at the Battle of Smolensk during the Russian retreat to Moscow.
1812 Aug 18 Returning from a cruise into Canadian waters Captain Isaac Hull’s USS Constitution of the fledgling U.S. Navy encountered British Captain Richard Dacre’s HMS Guerriere about 750 miles out of Boston. After a frenzied 55-minute battle that left 101 dead, Guerriere rolled helplessly in the water, smashed beyond salvage. Dacre struck his colors and surrendered to Hull’s boarding party. In contrast, Constitution suffered little damage and only 14 casualties. The fight’s outcome shocked the British Admiralty while it heartened America through the dark days of the War of 1812. [see Aug 19]
1812 Aug 19 The USS Constitution, also known as Old Ironsides, got its name when it defeated the British warship Guerriere off Nova Scotia in a slugfest of broadsides, when cannonballs were said to have bounced off her sides. The USS Constitution won more than 30 battles against the Barbary pirates off Africa’s coast in the War of 1812. [see Aug 18]
1812 Aug 20 Czar Alexander gave Gen. Mikhail Ilarionovich Kutuzov (1745-1813) command of the Russian army.
1812 August August: USS Constitution defeats the British frigate Guerrière off the coast of Nova Scotia. The British shot is said to have bounced off the Constitution’s sides, earning her the nickname “Old Ironsides”.
1812 Sep 7 On the road to Moscow, Napoleon won a costly victory over the Russians under Kutuzov at Borodino. This was the greatest mass slaughter in the history of warfare until the Battle of the Somme in 1916. In 2004 Adam Zamoyski authored “Napoleon’s Fatal March on Moscow.”
1812 Sep 12 Richard March Hoe was born in NYC. He built the first successful rotary printing press.
1812 Sep 14 The Russian army left Moscow. Napoleon’s invasion of Russia reached its climax as his Grande Armee entered Moscow, only to find the enemy capital deserted and burning, set afire by the few Russians who remained. The fires were extinguished by Sep 19.
1812 Sep 18 A fire in Moscow (set by Napoleon’s troops) destroyed 90% of houses and 1,000 churches. [see Sep 14]
1812 Sep In France as Napoleon’s army proceeded to invade Russia it numbered 442,000 troops. In Sept. it reached Moscow with 100,000 men. The remains of the Grandee Armee struggled out of Russia in 1813 with 10,000 men. A map drawn by Charles Joseph Minard plots six variables to depict the march over time: the size of the army, its location on a 2-dimensional surface, the direction of the army’s movement, and temperatures on various days during the retreat from Moscow. In 1970 Curtis Cate published the book: “The War of the Two Emperors.”
1812 Sep William Moorcroft, East India Co. head of 5,000 acre horse farm at Pusa, India, was arrested in Nepal while returning from Tibet to India. They were released after 17 days in captivity.
1812 Sep-Oct Moscow was burned under the brief occupation by Napoleon. After the burning the Neglinnaya River was confined to an underground pipe.
1812 September September: Napoleon enters Moscow, but most of the city’s 300,000 inhabitants have fled, and fires set by the Russians burn much of Moscow in the next 5 days.
1812 September September: Napoleon leads his Grande Armée against the Imperial Russian army at the Battle of Borodino. It is largest and bloodiest single-day action of the Napoleonic Wars, involving more than 250,000 troops and resulting in at least 70,000 total casualties. Napoleon eventually captures the main positions on the battlefield, but fails to destroy the Russian army.
1812 Oct 9 American Lieutenant Jesse Duncan Elliot captured two British brigs, the Detroit and Caledonia on Lake Erie in the War of 1812. Elliot set the brig Detroit ablaze the next day in retaliation for the British capture seven weeks earlier of the city of Detroit.
1812 Oct 13 At the Battle of Queenston Heights, a Canadian and British army defeated the Americans who had tried to invade Canada. This was the 1st major land battle in the War of 1812.
1812 Oct 13 Isaac Brock, English general (conquered Detroit), died in battle.
1812 Oct 18 The Russian army attacked French forces on the outskirts of Moscow. Some 2,500-3,000 French soldiers were killed.
1812 Oct 19 French forces under Napoleon Bonaparte began their retreat from Moscow.
1812 Oct 22 The Duke of Wellington abandoned his 1st siege of Burgos, Spain.
1812 Oct 23 There was a failed coup against emperor Napoleon.
1812 Oct 25 The U.S. frigate United States captured the British vessel Macedonian during the War of 1812.
1812 October October: American naval forces capture two British warships, HMS Detroit and HMS Caledonia.
1812 October October: Earl of Wellington is made Marquess of Wellington for his victories in the Peninsula.
1812 October October: Napoleon begins his retreat from Moscow. His army moves west through country that has been laid waste to deny it sustenance, and the retreat turns into a rout as the army runs out of provisions. French losses in the Russian campaign amount to 570,000 against about 400,000 Russian casualties and several hundred thousand civilian deaths.
1812 October October: The Theatre Royal, Drury Lane (which burned down in 1809) re-opens in a new building designed by Benjamin Dean Wyatt with a production of Hamlet.
1812 Nov 9 Paul Abadie, French master builder (renovated Notre Dame), was born.
1812 Nov 14 As Napoleon Bonaparte’s army retreated form Moscow, temperatures dropped to 20 degrees below zero. Michel Ney defended the Napoleon‘s rear during the retreat from Moscow and was called by Napoleon “The bravest of the brave.” He rejoined Napoleon during the Hundred Days and the Waterloo campaign. After Napoleon‘s defeat, he was found guilty of treason and shot. It was later suggested that many soldiers died because their tin coat buttons deteriorated in the extreme cold.
1812 Nov 26 Napoleon Bonaparte’s army began crossing the Beresina River over two hastily constructed bridges.
1812 Nov 27 One of the two bridges being used by Napoleon Bonaparte’s army across the Beresina River in Russia collapsed during a Russian artillery barrage.
1812 Nov 29 The last elements of Napoleon Bonaparte’s Grand Armee retreated across the Beresina River in Russia. Tens of thousands of French troops and civilians perished when the Russians attacked Napoleon’s army as it crossed the Berezina River in Belarus on the punishing retreat from Moscow. The following Spring it was recorded that 32,000 bodies were rounded up and burned on the river banks near Studianka.
1812 Dec 2 James Madison was re-elected president of US; Elbridge Gerry was vice-pres.
1812 Dec 4 Peter Gaillard of Lancaster, Pa., patented a horse-drawn mower.
1812 Dec 6 The majority of Napoleon Bonaparte’s Grand Armeé staggered into Vilnius, Lithuania, ending the failed Russian campaign. An estimated 50,000 soldiers reached Lithuania and as many as 20,000 died there. As many as 450,000 soldiers from France, Italy, Spain, Croatia, Germany and at least 15 other countries died in the Russian campaign.
1812 Dec 8 In California the Great Stone Church at Mission San Juan Capistrano crashed down after an earthquake just 6 years after being completed. Forty worshippers were killed. Half of the church under the work of architect Isidro Aguilar (d.1803) remained standing.
1812 Dec 13 The last remnants of Napoleon Bonaparte’s Grand Armeé reached the safety of Kovno, Poland, after the failed Russian campaign.
1812 Dec 18 Napoleon Bonaparte arrived in Paris after his disastrous campaign in Russia.
1812 Dec 20 Achille Peri, composer, was born.
1812 Dec 20 Sacagawea, Shoshone interpreter for Lewis & Clark, died.
1812 Dec 23 Samuel Smiles (d.1904), doctor and writer, was born in Scotland.  He later authored “Self-Help” 1859), a classic work on self-improvement.
1812 Dec 24 Joel Barlow, aged 58, American poet and lawyer, died from exposure near Vilna, Poland [Lithuania], during Napoleon’s retreat from Moscow. Barlow was on a diplomatic mission to the emperor for President Madison.
1812 Dec 14, The last French units of Napoleon’s Grand Armeé crossed the Nieman River of Lithuania, leaving Russia.
1812 Dec Michael Faraday began working for Sir Humphrey Davy at the British Royal Society.
1812  
1812 A three-way treaty is signed between Britain, Sweden and Russia known as the Treaty of Örebro.
1812 A treaty is signed between Sweden and Russia, known as the Treaty of St. Petersburg.
1812 Angelica Catalini performs in the first London production of Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro.
1812 Charles Dickens is born.
1812 German philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel publishes the first volume of his Science of Logic, which will dominate metaphysical discourse for the next quarter century.
1812 J.M.W. Turner exhibits Snow Storm: Hannibal and His Army Crossing the Alps at the Royal Academy.
1812 Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm publish their first collection of 86 German fairy tales in Folk Tales for Children and the Home.
1812 Lady Emma Hamilton, 47, is sent to an English debtor’s prison after squandering her late husband’s fortune within 9 years. (She was also the mistress of Admiral Lord Nelson.) A friend eventually helps her to escape to Calais and she dies there in 1815.
1812 Maria Edgeworth’s The Absentee is published.
1812 Napoleon and his Grand Army invade Russia at the battle of Borodino. The French manage to capture Moscow but are forced to retreat. Out the original 600,000 strong French army, only 100,000 survive the retreat.
1812 Poet William Combe publishes his Tour of Dr. Syntax in Search of the Picturesque by with illustrations by Thomas Rowlandson.
1812 Sarah Siddons, actress, at age 57 appears at Covent Garden on June 29 as Lady Macbeth and bids farewell to the stage. She does continue to make guest appearances and gives occasional reading recitals.
1812 Shipping and territory disputes spark a war between England and the United States.
1812 Snow Storm: Hannibal and His Army Crossing the Alps by J.M.W. Turner, 1812. The painting was popular with contemporary viewers not only for its revolutionary atmospheric effects and its vision of the destructive power of nature, but also because it suggested a parallel between Hannibal and Napoleon, who had crossed the Alps to invade Italy in 1797 — thus giving hope that Napoleon, too, would eventually be defeated.
1812 The British gain a victory over Spain at the Battle of Salamanca.
1812 The final shipment of the Elgin Marbles arrives from Greece.
1812 The Russo-Turkish war ends with the signing of the Treaty of Bucharest.
1812 The third volume of Joanna Baillie’s Plays of the Passions is published
1812 The United States declares war on Britain.
1812 William Bullock’s museum of antiquities and curiosities opens in his newly built Egyption Hall on Piccadilly.
1812 The United States declares war after suffering under England’s naval blockade.
1812 Darkly handsome Lord Byron publishes Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, which is an instant success.
1812 Spencer Perceval assassinated in the House of Commons. Final shipment of the Elgin Marbles arrives in England. Sarah Siddons retires from the stage. Shipping and territory disputes start the War of 1812 between England and the United States. The British are victorious over French armies at the Battle of Salamanca. The waltz is introduced from Europe into England. Gas company (Gas Light and Coke Company) founded.
1812 For the Ottoman empire, Muhammad Ali Pasha drives the Wahhabi and Saudis out of Medina and Mecca.
1812 n England, a few workers called Luddites in various cities in the spinning and cloth finishing industries have been destroying new machinery. They fear technological unemployment. Some are executed.
1812  Priests in Caracas claim that an earthquake is God’s anger against the sins of the new government. Spain’s military is able to regain control of the city.
1812  At sea, Britain has a counter-blockade against France. Britain’s new prime minister, Lord Liverpool, instructs the British navy to treat U.S. trading ships with new tact and to avoid clashes with Americans. This does not deter those in the U.S. who want war, and Congress declares war against Britain on June 18, 1812.
1812 Napoleon’s march into Russia exposes his recklessness and shallow strategic thinking. He returns to Paris without his army. 
1812 Jacques-Louis David, French artist, painted a portrait of Napoleon as a working ruler.
1812 Louis-Vincent-Leon Palliere, French painter, created his work “Ulysses and Telemachus Massacre Penelope’s Suitors.”
1812 Pierre-Paul Prud’hon (1758-1823), French artist, painted “Venus and Adonis.”
1812 Georges Cuvier, French anatomist, published his 4 volume work “Recherches sur les ossemens fossiles” (Research on Fossil Bones).
1812 Nicodemus Havens authored his “Wonderful Vision of the City of New York,” wherein he was presented with a view of the Situation of the World, after the dreadful Fourth of June, 1812, and showing what part of New York is to be destroyed.
1812 Louisa d’Andelot du Pont Copeland spearheaded the founding of the Delaware Art Museum.
1812 Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm published their first collection of “Folk Tales for Children and the Home.” It included “The Frog King, or Iron Henry.”
1812 The 1st American recipe for tomato ketchup was published.
1812 Madison proposed to France and England that if one would stop attacking American commerce at sea, then the US would break off commercial relations with the other. Napoleon quickly accepted Madison’s terms and under congressional pressure Madison declared war on England. He did not know that 24 hours prior to the declaration, England had voted to stop its abuses on American shipping.
1812 Mackinaw Island, Michigan, was recaptured by the British.
1812 The Cherokee Indians sided with the United States in the War of 1812.
1812 Gen. “Mad” Anthony Wayne established Fort Wayne, Indiana. He got his nickname because he was crazy enough to join his troops on the front lines.
1812 Maine separated from the state of Massachusetts.
1812 The 1st New England cotton mill was erected in Fall River, Mass.
1812 Du Pont was forced to give up a big piece of its explosives business due to government trust busting but kept its military line and became the chief supplier to the Allies in WW I. The Hagley Museum and Library in Wilmington tracked the business history of the du Ponts.
1812 The small Bank of America was founded in NYC.
1812 Aaron Benedict started a button-making business in Waterbury, Conn. The name was changed to Benedict & Burnham in 1834, and to Benedict & Burnham Manufacturing in 1843.
1812 The steamboat New Orleans was built in Pittsburgh and steamed to New Orleans but lacked sufficient power to return upstream.
1812 Mason Weems made his sermon concerning gambling: “O gamblers!… You are engaged in the most horrible warfare that rational beings can ever undertake. A warfare most unnatural; even against the best and noblest part of your nature—your social affections and sympathies with your kind.
1812 Mary Anning of Lyme Regis in Dorcetshire, England, excavated a 17-foot-long skeleton and sold it to Henry Hoste Henley, Lord of the Manor of Colway for £23. The fossil was later named Icthyosaurus.
1812 Russia acquired Bessarabia, the north eastern part of the original principality of Moldavia, in the aftermath of the Russo-Turkish War (1806-1812).
1812 Dec, Vilnius, Lithuania, was recaptured by Russian forces.
1812 Swiss explorer Jean Louis Burckhardt rediscovered the ancient city of Petra in present-day Jordan.
1812-1840 Carl Ludvig Engel, a Prussian architect, redesigned and rebuilt Helsinki as the capital of the Grand Duchy of Finland-Russia.
1812-1841 Russian fur traders established the settlement of Fort Ross in northern California.
1812-1888 May 12, Edward Lear, English author of nonsense verse is born.

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Timeline

Each time I start a year, I have already compiled a list, months ago with about 6000 entered of what happened from 1788 to 1837. My first step now (It took several trials to get this down to a science) is to cut out the specific year I will work on and paste it into its own spreadsheet to work with. When I worked on the entire spreadsheet, sometimes inserting a line, with all the graphics I had begun to place, took a long time. Working on each year alone, is a lot faster.

With the year separated out, I now turn to my book sources,

The Timetables of History by Grun and Stein1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-30-08-03.jpg

Chronology of CULTURE by Paxton and Fairfield

1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-30-08-03.jpg What Happened When by Carruth.

PastedGraphic-2012-08-30-08-03.jpg, History of the World. A beautiful Dorling Kindersley book.

I now and diligently look through each of these to find entries that I did not come across on the internet, and other printed lists. It is possible that there are places that have more listings for each year. I have not found them. And when you go to the Timelines at the Regency Assembly Press page, there you will see all the graphical references as well. Something that I did not find anywhere else.

Here is the start of 1811:

Year Month Day Event
1811 4-Jan Jan. 4: A heavy fall of snow rendered the northern roads almost impassable. The river Severn froze.  The River Thames froze
1811 5-Jan Jan. 5: Two outside passengers on the Carlisle coach frozen to death.
1811 10-Jan Jan. 10. A monster, or women hater, dangerously wounded a female in St. James’s Park
1811 13-Jan Jan. 13: Gallant Action in which the merchant ship Cumberland, Capt. Barratt, beat off four French privateers.
1811 16-Jan Jan. 16: A chimney sweep’s boy suffocated in a chimney in Orchard street, Westminister.
1811 22-Jan Jan. 22: The Cosgrove Aqueduct, an iron aqueduct bridge of the Grand Junction Canal  over the river Ouse near Stratford (pictured here), opened for the passage of boats. This is a cast iron trough in which canal boats navigated from one side of the river to the other passing through several locks as it moves up hill. A tow path runs alongside the canal on one side, on the other it looks something like an infinity pool.
1811 31-Jan Jan. 31: there was an eruption of a volcano in 80 fathoms of water, near Azores.
1811 Jan 2 US Sen Timothy Pickering (1745-1829) of Massachusetts became the 1st US senator to be censured. He had revealed confidential documents communicated by the president of the US.
1811 Jan 6 Charles Sumner (d.1874), leading anti-slavery senator and author, was born in Boston. He was active in the movement to outlaw war, opposed the Mexican War and was a founder in 1848 of the Free-Soil party. A senator from Massachusetts, Sumner was an ardent abolitionist and helped organize the Republican party. In c1867 Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner popularized the name Alaska for the territory that had been known as Russian America in a famous Senate speech supporting the treaty to purchase Russian America: “There is the National flag. He must be cold, indeed, who can look upon its folds rippling in the breeze without pride of country. If in a foreign land, the flag is companionship, and country itself, with all its endearments.”
1811 Jan 8 Charles Deslondes led several hundred poorly armed slaves towards New Orleans in the largest slave rebellion in US history.
1811 Jan 9 The USS Revenge, a ship commanded by US Navy hero Oliver Hazard Perry ran aground on a reef off of Watch Hill, Rhode Island. Divers discovered the wreck in August 2005, but only made the news public in 2011.
1811 Jan 10 An uprising of over 400 slaves was put down in New Orleans. Sixty-six blacks were killed and their heads were strung up along the roads of the city.
1811 Jan 15 In a secret session, Congress planned to annex Spanish East Florida.
1811 January January: Marshall Soult captures Olivenza.
1811 5-Feb On February 5, with George III insane, George IV (Prinny) is declared Regent, thus officially starting the Regency period.
1811 6-Feb Feb.6: His R.H. the Prince of Wales was sworn into office of Regent.
1811 10-Feb Feb.10: A conflagration near Limehouse hole stairs (on the river near the southwest India dock) destroyed four warehouses and twelve dwelling houses.
1811 23-Feb Feb.23: A decree of Bonaparte ordered prisoners of war to be employed as laborers.
1811 26-Feb Feb.26: John Liles sentenced to seven years transportation, for bigamy.
1811 26-Feb Feb.26: Hadje Hassan, ambassador from Algiers, had his first audience of the Prince Regent.
1811 27-Feb Feb.27: The House of representatives in the American congress passed a bill prohibiting intercourse with Great Britain and on Feb. 28 Mr. Pinkney, the American minister in this country, had his audience of leave.
1811 Feb 1 Scotland’s Bell Rock lighthouse, at the mouth of Scotland’s Firth of Forth, began operations. Robert Stevenson (1772-1850) had begun work on the lighthouse in 1807.
1811 Feb 2 Russian settlers established Ft. Ross trading post in northern California. Fort Ross was settled by peg-legged Ivan Kuzkov (Kuskov) in Sonoma County (1912). It was designed as a base for fur hunters and a warm weather supplier for the Russian colonies in Alaska. The colonists included 25 Russians and over 80 Aleut Indians from the islands of western Alaska. Kuskov managed the settlement until 1821.
1811 Feb 3 Horace Greeley (d.1872), abolitionist newspaper editor, was born in Amherst, New Hampshire. He popularized the phrase “Go west, young man.” Greeley, who began his journalism career at The New Yorker, founded The New York Tribune in 1841 with support from powerful political friends. Under Greeley’s direction, The Tribune took a strong stand against slavery, the South and slave owners in the years leading up to the Civil War. The Tribune and Greeley also crusaded against liquor, gambling, prostitution and capital punishment. One of the founders of the Republican Party, Greeley was also an eccentric who dabbled in many of the fads of his day. The phrase was spoken to Josiah Grinell, who went west to Iowa, became a Congregational minister and founded Grinell College from which Robert Noyce, developer of the microchip and founder of Intel, graduated. “There is no bigotry like that of ‘free thought’ run to seed.”
1811 Feb 5 George, Prince of Wales, was named the Prince Regent due to the insanity of his father, Britain’s King George III. George Augustus Frederick became prince regent after his father, George III, slipped permanently into dementia. In 1999 Saul David published “The Prince of Pleasure: The Prince of Wales and the Making of the Regency.”
1811 Feb 11 Pres. Madison prohibited trade with Britain for 3rd time in 4 years.
1811 February February: The Regency Act is passed by Parliament, authorizing the Prince of Wales to rule in his father’s place as the Prince Regent.
1811 1-Mar Mar.1 A stone weighing fifteen pounds fell from the clouds in Russia.Oops.  I bet that was a surprise.
1811 5-Mar Mar.5: The battle of Barossa gained by Gen. Graham, against the French under Marshal Victor. Sergeant Patrick Masterson captured the first French eagle to be taken in battle by th British from the French, in this case from the 8th of the Line
1811 11-Mar Mar.11: Badajos surrendered to the French.
1811 11-Mar Mar.11: The House of Commons voted a loan of six millions for the relief of merchants and manufacturers. You  will see why, later.
1811 12-Mar Mar.12: Riots at Nottingham, in consequence of distress among workmen.
1811 20-Mar Mar.20: Birth of Bonaparte’s son. The king of Rome. Pictured on the left as the Duke of Reichstadt, he became the Emperor of France for fifteen days, when his father abdicated in 1815, though it is doubtful he was aware of it, as he and his mother had fled to Austria. 
1811 23-Mar Mar.23:A riot in Bristol caused by a rise in the price of butter,
1811 26-Mar Mar.26: Sequestrated English merchandise to the amount of £100,000 sterling, burned at Swinemunde.
1811 31-Mar Mar.31: Confiscated English manufacturer to the amount of £50,000 burned at Rugenwalde.
1811 Mar 1 In Egypt the Ottoman viceroy Muhammad Ali Pasha massacred the Mameluke leaders of Egypt for plotting against him. He had invited them to a banquet at the citadel of Cairo.
1811 Mar 11 Urbain Jean Joseph le Verrier, co-discoverer (Neptune), was born.
1811 Mar 11 Ned Ludd led a group of workers in a wild protest against mechanization. Members of the organized bands of craftsmen who rioted against automation in 19th century England were known as Luddites and also “Ludds.” The movement, reputedly named after Ned Ludd, began near Nottingham as craftsman destroyed textile machinery that was eliminating their jobs. By the following year, Luddites were active in Yorkshire, Derbyshire, Lancashire and Leicestershire. Although the Luddites opposed violence towards people (a position which allowed for a modicum of public support), government crackdowns included mass shootings, hangings and deportation to the colonies. It took 14,000 British soldiers to quell the rebellion. The movement effectively died in 1813 apart from a brief resurgence of Luddite sentiment in 1816 following the end of the Napoleonic Wars.
1811 Mar 20 George Caleb Bingham (d.1879), Missouri painter, was born in Virginia. He paintings included “Fur Traders on the Missouri.”
1811 Mar 20 Napoleon II, the Duke of Reichstadt, was born. He was the son of Napoleon Bonaparte.
1811 Mar 25 A comet, dubbed the Great Comet of 1911, was discovered by Honoré Flaugergues at 2.7 AU from the sun in the now-defunct constellation of Argo Navis. In October 1811, at its brightest, it displayed an apparent magnitude of 0, with an easily visible coma.
1811 Mar 31 Robert Wilhelm Eberhard von Bunsen, German inventor of the Bunsen burner, was born.
1811 March March: Napoleon’s only son is born, and is designated as King of Rome.
1811 March March: Ottoman Viceroy Muhammad Ali Pasha orchestrates a massacre of hundreds of Maremluke leaders when he invites them to a celebration in Cairo.
1811 March March: Soult capture Badajoz.
1811 March March: The Great Comet of 1811 is visible to the naked eye for 260 days.
1811 1-Apr Apr. 1: Confiscated English manufactures to the amount of £60,000 burned at Memel.What a lot of waste and loss. This was part of the blockade.
1811 3-Apr Apr.3: At the late Duke Queensberry’s sale, his Tokay wine sold at eighty four pounds per dozen. So to put that in perspective when you go to the liquor store, or wherever you buy your wine, that is about £2,852.64 for 12. Tokay is really Tokaji wine. It comes from Hungary and is a sweet wine and was  the subject of the world’s first appellation control, established several decades before Port wine and over 120 years before the classification of Bordeaux. Vineyard classification began in 1730 with vineyards being classified into 3 categories depending on the soil, sun exposure and potential to develop noble rot, botrytis cinerea, first class. A royal decree in 1757 established a closed production district in Tokaj. The classification system was completed by the national censuses of 1765 and 1772. Introduced to the French court, it  was also a very popular wine during the regency in England, as indicated by the price.
1811 4-Apr Apr.4: A proclamation to the Berlin Court Gazette, forbidding any English man, or any other foreigner, to enter the Prussian territory  without a passport.
1811 8-Apr Apr.8: several persons killed by the fall of two houses in Ironmonger Row, Old Street.
1811 10-Apr Apr.10: a riot at Brighton between a party of the South Gloucester militia, and a party of the inhabitants,
1811 10-Apr Apr.10: William Gibbs reprieved at the moment when about to be hanged for a robbery committed by his sweetheart of which he had taken upon  himself the guilt in order to save her life. Talk about true love. And the save sounds a bit last minute too.
1811 14-Apr Apr,14: The French Garrison of Olivenza surrendered at discretion to the allied army.
1811 20-Apr Apr.20: Eight persons perished in the conflagration of a house in Half Moon Alley, Bishopsgate.
1811 21-Apr Apr.21: A Young nobleman lost £24,000 at one of the fashionable gambling houses. In today’s money, according to the British National Archives this would be worth in the order of £814,0000 or in US $1,337,238.10. Now I don’t know how you feel about that but my little flutters at the casino amount to $30 in a night.
1811 24-Apr Apr.24:Mackerel sold at Billingsgate, at eight shillings a piece by the hundred. Not so expensive, then.
1811 24-Apr Apr.24: A subscription set on foot at the London Tavern for the relief of the Portuguese.
1811 25-Apr Apr.25: Thirty five men killed, and eighteen wounded, by an explosion of inflammable air in a coal mine near Liege. Interesting how they call it air rather than gas.
1811 29-Apr Apr.29: The commissioners of Hyde Park turnpike let their tolls for £17,000 per annum.  A profit of £580,000 in today’s money. One can only imagine how much the person taking the tolls actually made.
1811 Apr 5 Robert Raikes, founder of Sunday Schools, died.
1811 Apr 12 First U.S. colonists on Pacific coast arrived at Cape Disappointment, Washington.
1811 22-May May 22: – several people were killed by a house falling at Seven Dials.  This was in one of the poorest and most notorious regions of London in the Parish of St Giles where one also found the worst of the rookeries.  A dangerous place for any Regency buck or miss to wander at any time of the day, but even worse for those that lived there. Near to Covent Garden, it was called Seven Dials because of the way the streets and alleys come together in one intersection which originally had a sundial in the centre. The first plan in 1690  was for six  streets, but the developer Thomas Neale who planned this to be a smart end of town with large fronted shops, added a seventh in the final plans in order to increase his income from rents.  It never achieved its potential. After his death, the houses were subdivided and quickly became slums, renowned for  gin shops. At times, the area threatened to descend into the undesirable depravity of the St Giles “Rookery” to the north, but it was predominantly a working neighbourhood, with woodcarvers, straw-hat manufacturers, pork butchers, watch repairers, booksellers, pubs and breweries. At one point each of the seven apexes facing the Monument housed a pub, their cellars and vaults connected in the basement providing handy escape routes should the need arise.These days it is very different. It has boutique style shops and a new sense of community. Over 25% of its buildings are “listed” (protected) and many date back to the 1690’s. Clearly not the one that fell on these poor people.
1811 May 11 Chang and Eng Bunker, Chinese Siamese twins, were born.
1811 May May: Beresford defeats Soult at Albuerra.
1811 May May: British Major General Beresford begins the First Siege at Badajoz.
1811 May May: The Duke of York is re-instated as Commander-in-Chief of the British Army.
1811 May May: Wellington defeats Marshall Masséna at Fuentes de Onoro.
1811 14-Jun June14: -The proceedings of the House of Commons state the number of French prisoners in England to be near 50,000.
1811 Jun 14 Harriet Beecher Stowe (d.1896), American writer and author of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” was born in Litchfield, Conn. The book showed the horrors of slavery and President Abraham Lincoln joked she had started the American Civil War.
1811 Jun 19 Samuel P. Chase (b.Apr 17, 1741), Supreme Court Justice (1798-1811), revolutionary, attorney, Declaration of Independence signer; died. Chase was served with 6 articles of impeachment by the House of Representatives in late 1804. Two more articles would later be added. The Jeffersonian Republican-controlled United States Senate began an impeachment trial against Justice Chase in early 1805. He was charged with political bias, but was acquitted by the Senate of all charges on March 1, 1805. To this day, he remains the only Supreme Court justice to be impeached.
1811 June June: The Print Regent stages an elaborate fete at Carlton House, costing over £120,000, ostensibly in honor of the exiled royal family of France, but actually in celebration of his assumption of the Regency.
1811 Jul 5 Venezuela became the first South American country to declare independence from Spain.
1811 Jul 18 William Makepeace Thackeray (d.1863), English novelist and satirist, was born. His books were published as monthly serials. “Next to excellence is the appreciation of it.”
1811 Jul 31 Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, Mexican hero priest, was executed by Spanish.
1811 July July: Venezuela declares independence from Spain.
1811 21-Aug Aug. 21: – A comet made its appearance above the horizon. The Great Comet of 1811.  It is estimated that this comet comes around once every three thousand plus years, so I won’t be around to see it the next time. The drawing is by William Henry Smyth in 1811.
1811 Aug 3 Elisha Graves Otis (d.1861), inventor (safe elevator), was born. The Vermont native, was a master mechanic working at a bedstead factory in Yonkers, N.Y., when he built a hoisting machine with two sets of metal teeth at the car’s sides. If the lifting rope broke, the teeth would lock into place, preventing the car from falling. Otis ever realized the potential of his invention. His sons built the Otis Elevator Company, enabling the skylines of cities throughout the world to be transformed with skyscrapers.
1811 Aug 5 C.L. Ambroise Thomas, French composer (Mignon, Francoise de Rimini), was born.
1811 Aug 6 Judah Philip Benjamin (d.1884), Sec. War and Sec. State for the Confederacy, was born a British subject in the Virgin Islands. He went on to become the first professed Jew elected to U.S. Senate, from the state of Louisiana in 1852. He was brought to South Carolina as a child. After attending Yale (1825–7) he settled in New Orleans. He served Louisiana in the US Senate (Whig, 1853–9; Democrat, 1859–61). He was noted for his pro-slavery speeches in the Senate. Favoring secession, he served the Confederacy as attorney general (1861) and then as secretary of war (1861–2). He was blamed for the Confederate army’s lack of equipment, but Jefferson Davis promoted him to secretary of state (1862–5). Late in the war he urged the recruitment of slaves into the Confederate Army. With the collapse of the Confederacy he fled to the West Indies and then to England (1866), where he made a brilliant new career as a British barrister, especially in appeal cases. He wrote the Treatise on the Law of Sale of Personal Property (1868), which at once became the standard in the field. In 1872, he became a counsel to the queen. Benjamin died in Paris.
1811 Aug 12 John FE Acton (77), cruel premier of Naples, died.
1811 Aug 14 Paraguay declared independence from Spain.
1811 Aug 31 Théophile Gautier, French poet, novelist and author of “Art for Art’s Sake,” was born.
1811 August August: Paraguay decalres independence from Spain.
1811 11-Sep Sep.11: – Discovery made at the Queen’s house that her majesty’s court dress had been stolen. Really, how bad is that?
1811 Sep 3 John Humphrey Noyes was born in Vermont. He founded the Oneida Community (Perfectionists) in 1848.
1811 September September: A rematch between bareknuckle champion Tom Cribb and the American ex-slave Tom Molineaux, attracts 20,000 spectators to Thistleton Gap, outside London. Cribb wins easily in 19 minutes. He retires in 1822, undefeated.
1811 September September: Java, Palembang (in Sumatra), Macassar, and Timor are ceded by the Dutch to the British at the conclusion of the Anglo-Dutch Java War.
1811 September September: Thomas Stamford Raffles is appointed Lt-Governor of Java, which he will administer until 1816..
1811 Oct 11 The first steam-powered ferryboat, the Juliana, was put into operation between New York City and Hoboken, N.J.
1811 Oct 22 Franz Liszt, piano virtuoso, was born near Sopron, Hungary. He was the son of a steward of the Esterhazy family.
1811 Oct 27 Isaac Merrit Singer, inventor of a practical home sewing machine, was born.
1811 Oct 29 The 1st Ohio River steamboat left Pittsburgh for New Orleans.
1811 Nov 5 El Salvador fought its 1st battle against Spain for independence.
1811 Nov 7 Gen. William Henry Harrison won a battle against the Shawnee Indians at the Battle of Tippecanoe in the Indiana territory. Tenskwatawa, the brother of Shawnee leader Tecumseh, was engaged in the Battle of the Wabash, aka Battle of Tippecanoe, in spite of his brother’s strict admonition to avoid it. The battle near the Tippecanoe River with the regular and militia forces of Indiana Territory Governor William Henry Harrison, took place while Tecumseh was out of the area seeking support for a united Indian movement. The battle, which was a nominal victory for Harrison’s forces, effectively put an end to Tecumseh’s dream of a pan-Indian confederation. Harrison’s leadership in the battle also provided a useful campaign slogan for his presidential bid in 1840.
1811 Nov 16 John Bright, British Victorian radical, was born. He founded the Anti-Corn Law League.
1811 Nov 16 An earthquake in Missouri caused the Mississippi River to flow backwards. [see Dec 15-16]
1811 Nov 21 Heinrich W. von Kleist (34), German playwright, died.
1811 Nov 29 Wendell Phillips, women’s suffrage, antislavery, prison reformer, was born.
1811 November November: Beethoven’s Concerto No. 5 in E flat major for Pianoforte and Orchestra (Emperor) is premiered in Leipzig.
1811 November November: The Luddite movement (protesting the mechanization of the textile industry, often by destroying new machinery) begins in Nottingham and spreads throughout England.
1811 November November unrest: — Bands of men appear wearing masks and armed with muskets, pistols and hatchets and break into the small hosiery workshops scattered thoughout country villages. Hammermen carrying hung heavy iron sledgehammers smashed open the doors of the workshops and beat at the wide stocking frames until they are destroyed. E.g. Nov 4 6 frames broken at the village of Bulwell on November 4, a dozen at Kimberley a few nights later. November 13 70 frames smashed in a single attack at Sutton-in-Ashfield. Claimed allegiance to “General Ludd”. Magistrates cannot police the rural jurisdictions. A military force, a squadron of dragoons, the Mansfield Volunteers, two troops of Yeomanry were ineffective.
1811 Dec 15 to Dec 16 A 7.3 earthquake struck the central US on the Mississippi River. It was centered at New Madrid, Missouri. Aftershocks continued into 1812. In 1976 James Penick Jr. authored “The New Madrid Earthquakes of 1811-1812.” [see Jan 23, Feb 7, 1812]
1811 Anne Grant, 56, writes Superstitions of the Highlander in Edinburgh and gains the support of Walter Scott.
1811 George III (now blind and becoming mad after losing his favorite daughter, Amelia) is declared insane by the Regency Act passed by Parliament on February 5 and his son, the Prince of Wales (age 49) is authorized and takes over the rule of England as regent.
1811 Jane Austen’s book, Sense and Sensibility, A Novel by a Lady is published anonymously in London. She is 36 year old spinster who will later be known as one of the world’s great novelists.
1811 Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility is published.
1811 Luddite riots occur in England against mechanizing the textile industry.
1811 Mary Anning, age 12, discovers the 30-ft-long fossil of an ichthyosaur at Lume Regis, the first such fossil known.
1811 Napoleon decrees that French foundling hospitals will be given turntable devices (tours) so that parents can leave unwanted infants without being recognized. Before this, millions of babies had been drowned, smothered or abandoned, which Napoleon felt left the French army short of potential recruits. His effort works, eventually resulting in over 127,000 babies being left through such methods.
1811 Paraguay and Venezuela become independent.
1811 Prince George becomes Prince Regent.
1811 Stamford Raffles administers Batavia and Java until 1816.
1811 The Duke of Clarence (who would later reign as William IV) is named Admiral of the Fleet.
1811 The French are driven out of Portugal.
1811 The Mamelukes are massacred in Cairo by Mohammed Ali.
1811 For much of the year, the Great Comet blazes across the night sky.
1811 George, Prince of Wales begins his nine-year tenure as regent and becomes known as The Prince Regent. This sub-period of the Georgian era begins the formal Regency. The Duke of Wellington holds off the French at Fuentes d’Onoro and Albuhera in the Peninsular War. The Prince Regent holds a fete at nine p.m. June 19, 1811 at Carlton House in celebration of his assumption of the Regency. Luddite uprisings. Glasgow weavers riot.
1811-1815 Luddite riots: laborers attack factories and break up the machines they fear will replace them.
1811 Plantation slaves just outside New Orleans are aware of the successful slave revolt that freed the slaves of Haiti (1791-1804). On January 8, between 200 and 500 slaves near New Orleans, from more than one plantation, join together with stolen arms against their masters and oppressors. They kill for their freedom. There is a musket face-off in which the slaves lose. Most are executed and their heads displayed on pikes as a lesson for other slaves.
1811 The French are driven from Portugal.
1811 Independence is declared in Caracas (Venezuela), La Paz (Bolivia) and New Grenada (Colombia). Fighting erupts between those favoring independence and Spanish authority in Latin America.
1811 In Egypt, Viceroy Muhammad Ali Pasha exterminates Mamluk warlords. He invites them to a banquet and has them slaughtered.
1811 A 60-year-old Spanish priest, Hildago, who was influenced by the Enlightment, is executed after leading an uprising in behalf of the well being of Indians and mestizos.
1811 The book “Sense and Sensibility,” by Jane Austen (1774-1817), was published. It appeared anonymously as “written by a lady.”
1811 The Bowdoin College Museum of Art in Brunswick was begun as a bequest from James Bowdoin III, son of a college benefactor.
1811 A group of amateur naturalists formed the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia.
1811 The 1st rubber factory was established.
1811 In the US politics killed the Bank of the United States established by Hamilton as a central bank and a mechanism for government borrowing.
1811 Francis Cabot Lowell, an American industrialist, moved to England and gathered information on mill details. He returned to the US and started the textile industry in New England and the Massachusetts mill town of his name.
1811 Fanny Burney (1752-1840), English writer, underwent a mastectomy without anesthesia. In 2001 Claire Harman authored the biography: “Fanny Burney.”
1811 Avogadro proposed that the ultimate particles of even elemental gases may not be atoms but instead molecules made up of combinations of atoms. He also proposed that equal volumes of gases contain equal numbers of molecules.
1811 Gas hydrates were first discovered but their molecular structure was not understood until the late 20th century. They are crystals of water that look like ice but contain a molecule of free-floating gas in a pentagonally-linked cage.
1811 William Burchell, botanist for the East India Company, set off into the bush for Hottentot country after his girlfriend abandoned him just before marriage. He stayed 4 years and is listed as the man who invented the working safari.
1811 In Britain the Dulwich Picture Gallery opened at Dulwich College. It contained an art collection gathered by Noel Desenfans and Francis Bourgeois, who had put it together for the Stanislaus Augustus Poniatowski, king of Poland, before he was forced to abdicate.
1811 British Foreign Secretary Lord Wellesley, older brother of the Duke of Wellington, wrote that the Peninsula War diverted French resources and that the time was ripe to strike against Napoleon.
1811 In England John Williams, the Highway Hacker, murdered 2 whole families in the Docklands section of London. He committed suicide while awaiting trial. A crowd stole his body and drove a stake through his heart and buried him in a lime pit off Cannon St. The murder later inspired Thomas De Quincey’s essay “On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts.”
1811 The British began a period of sovereignty in Java (Indonesia).
1811 The Mamelukes remained a powerful influence in Egypt until they were massacred or dispersed by Mehemet Ali.
1811 The Turks dispatched Egyptian ruler Muhammad Ali to overthrow the Wahabis and reinstate Ottoman sovereignty in Arabia.
1811 Napoleon Bonaparte gave to his wife, Empress Marie Louise, a tiara with 950 diamonds (700 carats). The original emeralds were later replaced with Persian turquoise. Now part of the Smithsonian Inst. and bequeathed by Marjorie Merriweather Post.
1811 Matsumura Gekkei (b.1752) also known as Goshun, Japanese painter based in Kyoto, died.
1811 Scotsman Gregor MacGregor (1786-1845), later known as His Serene Highness Gregor I, Prince of Poyais, received a commission from Simon Bolivar in Venezuela to serve in the Army of Liberation. After he returned to London in 1820, he began selling land in the fictional kingdom of Poyais. He served 8 months in jail after English and French expeditions revealed the hoax. In 1839 he returned to Venezuela. In 2004 David Sinclair authored “The Land That Never Was: Sir Gregor MacGregor and the Most Audacious Land Fraud in History.”
1811-1812 Marie Dorion, a 21-year-old Iowa Indian, was the only woman to accompany the 1811-12 overland expedition to the Pacific Northwest led by Wilson Price Hunt. Her husband, Pierre Dorion was hired as an interpreter. Marie would endure many hardships on the expedition to establish a fur trading post at the mouth of the Columbia River.
1811-1812 The Scott expedition to the South Pole culminated in tragedy.
1811-1812 In Mexico during the war for independence the crime rate rose to double digits for two years in a row.
1811-1816 The Luddite bands of workman destroyed manufacturing machinery in England under the belief that their use diminished employment. They were named after Ned Ludd, the 18th cent. Leicestershire worker who originated the idea. Opponents of technology harken back to the English weavers who broke textile machinery, apparently at the urging of their leader, Ned Ludd. [see May 3, 1811]
1811-1857 Jacob Whitman Bailey, teacher of chemistry, mineralogy and geology at West Point. He was a pioneer of American science and is noted for his microscopical studies.
1811-1882 Louis Blanc, French utopian socialist, proposed the social ideal of “from each according to his ability, to each according to his needs.” The nineteenth-century writer and thinker had a profound influence on radical thought.
1811-1881 Prof. Ferdinand Neselman of Koenigsburg Univ. first referred to the Aistians as the Balts in his book “The Language of the Prussians According to its Surviving Fragments.”
1811-1882 Henry James, US philosopher and author. He was the father of William and Henry.
1811-1884 Wendell Phillips, American abolitionist:  “Responsibility educates.”

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Timeline

Each time I start a year, I have already compiled a list, months ago with about 6000 entered of what happened from 1788 to 1837. My first step now (It took several trials to get this down to a science) is to cut out the specific year I will work on and paste it into its own spreadsheet to work with. When I worked on the entire spreadsheet, sometimes inserting a line, with all the graphics I had begun to place, took a long time. Working on each year alone, is a lot faster.

With the year separated out, I now turn to my book sources,

The Timetables of History by Grun and Stein1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-27-08-02.jpg

Chronology of CULTURE by Paxton and Fairfield

1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-27-08-02.jpg What Happened When by Carruth.

PastedGraphic-2012-08-27-08-02.jpg, History of the World. A beautiful Dorling Kindersley book.

I now and diligently look through each of these to find entries that I did not come across on the internet, and other printed lists. It is possible that there are places that have more listings for each year. I have not found them. And when you go to the Timelines at the Regency Assembly Press page, there you will see all the graphical references as well. Something that I did not find anywhere else.

Here is the start of 1810:

Year Month Day Event
1810 Jan 10 French church annulled the marriage of Napoleon I & Josephine.
1810 January January: Based on a minor technicality, the marriage of Napoleon and Joséphine is annulled. Though he claims to still love her, he needs an heir and she has not been able to produce one.
1810 January January: British portrait painter John Hoppner dies at age 51.
1810 Feb 20 Andreas Hofer (42), military leader (fought Napoleon’s France), was executed.
1810 Feb 28 The 1st US fire insurance joint-stock company was organized in Philadelphia.
1810 Mar 1 Frederic Chopin (d.1849), Polish composer and pianist, was born. He studied in Poland but spent most of his adult life in Paris. He met George Sand in Paris in 1838 and they were together until 1847. His works include the Waltz #2 in C# Minor (1835).
1810 Mar 2 Leo XIII (Vincenzo G Pecci), 256th Catholic Pope (1878-1903), was born.
1810 Mar 6 Illinois passed the 1st state vaccination legislation in US.
1810 Mar 10 John McCloskey, president of St. Johns College, was born.
1810 Mar 11 Emperor Napoleon of France was married by proxy to Archduchess Marie Louise of Austria.
1810 March March: Napoleon marries Archduchess Marie Louisa of Austria, daughter of Austrian emperor Francis I.
1810 Apr 17 Lewis Norton of Troy, PA., introduced his pineapple cheese.
1810 April April: Beethoven composes “Für Elise” (Bagatelle in A minor)
1810 May 3 Lord Byron swam the Hellespont.
1810 May 9 Louis Gallait, historical painter, was born.
1810 May 21 Charles Chevalier d’Eon de Beaumont (81), French spy, cross dresser, died.
1810 May 23 Margaret Fuller (d.1850), American social reformer, writer and critic, was born. She was the first female journalist for the New York Tribune. “Man is not made for society, but society is made for man. No institution can be good which does not tend to improve the individual.”
1810 May 25 Argentina declared independence and began its revolt from Napoleonic Spain.
1810 May 29 Erasmus Darwin Keyes (d.1895), Major General (Union volunteers), was born.
1810 May 29 Solomon Meredith (d,1875), Bvt Major General (Union volunteers), was born.
1810 May May: In the May Revolution, Armed citizens of Buenos Aires expel the Viceroy from Spain, declare their independence, and establish a provincial government for Argentina.
1810 May May: While on his Grand Tour, 22-year old Lord Byron swims across the Hellespont (Dardanelles) in a romantic imitation of the mythical Leander, who swam the mile and a half each night to be with his lover, Hero.
1810 Jun 8 Robert Schumann (d.1856), German composer, was born in Zwickau, Germany.
1810 Jun 9 Carl Otto Ehrenfried Nicolai, composer (Merry Wives of Windsor), was born.
1810 Jun 23 John Jacob Astor (1763-1848) organized the Pacific Fur Co. in Astoria, Oregon.
1810 Jul 5 P.T. Barnum (d.1891), American showman who formed the Barnum and Bailey Circus, was born. Years before founding the famous circus that bears his name, Barnum was recognized as the greatest showman and museum-owner of his time. Barnum’s goal was to attract attention, and it never bothered him if the wonders he exhibited in his New York American Museum were genuine or fake. Barnum opened the American Museum on Broadway in 1842, luring in customers by installing festive flags and New York’s first revolving spotlight on the roof of the building, both visible in this contemporary engraving. Abandoning the high-minded tone of most other museums, Barnum attracted huge audiences with marvels like the Feejee Mermaid, a grotesque composite of the top half of a monkey and the bottom half of a fish, and General Tom Thumb, a 25-inch-tall dwarf.
1810 Jul 20 Colombia declared independence from Spain.
1810 July July: Columbia declares independence from Spain.
1810 July July: Napoleon annexes the Kingdom of Holland following the abdication and flight of his brother Louis Bonaparte, who has been king since 1806 but refused to join the emperor’s Continental System.
1810 Aug 10 Camillo di Cavour, helped bring about the unification of Italy under the House of Saxony.
1810 Aug 14 Samuel Sebastian Wesley (d.1876), English composer, was born in London.
1810 Aug 21 Sweden’s Riksdag elected Jean-Baptiste Bernadotte, Marshal of France under Napoleon, as heir apparent to the Swedish throne.
1810 Aug 24 Theodore Parker, anti-slavery movement leader, was born.
1810 Aug 29 Juan Bautista Alberdi (d,1884), Argentine politician, writer, was born.
1810 August August: Napoleonic general Jean Baptiste Jules Bernadotte is elected as Crown Prince of Sweden.
1810 Sep 4 Donald McKay, US naval architect, built fastest clipper ships, was born.
1810 Sep 16 In Mexico Father Miguel Hidalgo-Costilla delivered the cry for freedom in front of a small crowd of his parishioners (The Grito de Dolores). This action stemmed from meetings of the literary and social club of Queretaro (now a central state of Mexico), which included the priest, the mayor of the town, and a local military captain named Ignacio Allende. They believed that New Spain should be governed by the Creoles (criollos) rather than the Gachupines (peninsulares). Rev. Hidalgo was joined by Rev. Jose Maria Morelos. Both priests were later executed by firing squads. When Mexico revolted the Spanish settlements began to fall apart. Under Mexican rule the missions were secularized and the huge land holdings were broken up.
1810 Sep 18 Chile declared its independence from Spain (National Day). Bernardo O’Higgins helped lead Chile to independence.
1810 September September: A disagreement over troop deployment between George Canning, British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, and Lord Castlereagh, the Secretary of State for War, ultimately leads to a duel. Canning, who had never fired a pistol, misses; Castlereagh wounds him in the thigh.
1810 September September: Chile declares independence from Spain.
1810 Oct 4 Alexander Walewski, French earl, foreign minister, son of Napoleon I, was born.
1810 Oct 8 James Wilson Marshall, discoverer of gold in California, was born.
1810 Oct 12 Bavarian Crown Prince Ludwig, later to become King Ludwig I, was married to Princess Therese of Saxony-Hildburghausen.  In honor of the wedding a horse race took place at the Theresienwiese (the Theresien meadow). The decision to repeat the horse races in subsequent years gave rise to the tradition of the Oktoberfest.
1810 Oct 16 Rabbi Nachman (b.1772) of Bratslav died and was buried in Uman, Ukraine. Nachman  was renowned for his mystical interpretations of Jewish texts and his belief that higher spirituality could be achieved through a combination of prayer, meditation and good deeds. On his deathbed, he is said to have promised to be an advocate for anyone who would come and pray beside his tomb.
1810 Oct 19 Cassius Marcellus Clay (d.1903), Major General (Union volunteers), was born.
1810 Oct 27 US annexes West Florida from Spain.
1810 October October: Wellington prevents French forces under Marshall Masséna from capturing Lisbon by staging a successful rearguard action at Torres Vedras.
1810 Nov 2 Andrew Atkinson Humphreys (d.1883), Mjr. Gen. (Union volunteers), was born.
1810 Nov 18 Asa Gray (d.1888), American botanist, was born. He wrote “Gray’s Manual.”
1810 Nov 30 Oliver Fisher Winchester, rifle maker, was born.
1810 November November: Painter Johann Zoffany dies at age 77.
1810 November November: The death of Princess Amelia sends George III into another bout of mental illness.
1810 Dec 7 Theodor Schwann, German physiologist, was born.
1810 Dec 22 British frigate Minotaur sank killing 480.
1810 Dec Gen. Andre Rigaud (1761-1811) returned to Haiti yet a third time, establishing himself as President of the Department of the South, in opposition to both Alexandre Petion and Henri Christophe.
1810 December December: English prizefighter Tom Cribb defends his world bareknuckle championship at Copthall Common, in Sussex, against American-born ex-slave Tom Molineaux, drawing over 10,000 spectators. Cribb is declared the winner after 34 rounds.
1810 December December: The HMS Minotaur, a 74-gun ship of the line, strikes a bank and goes down off the coast of the Netherlands. 480 crew members are lost.
1810
1810 Princess Amelia, youngest child of George III, was said to be his favorite. His grief over her death in 1810 at age 27 is believed to have brought on his final bout of madness.
1810 The famous Portland Vase is given to the British Museum, on permanent loan from the Duke of Portland. (It will be purchased by the museum in 1945.)
1810 The Portland Vase. The first century BC Roman cameo glass vase served as an inspiration to many glass and porcelain makers, especially Josiah Wedgwood, since it was first brought to England by Sir William Hamilton in 1784.
1810 Thomas Love Peacock’s Genius of the Thames: a Lyrical Poem is published.
1810 Walter Scott’s narrative poem, The Lady of the Lake, is published.
1810 Allied with the Portuguese against Napoleon, the British negotiate an agreement with the Portuguese calling for the gradual abolition of the slave trade across the South Atlantic.
1810 People have been migrating from the United States into West Florida. These settlers rebel and declare independence from Spain. Recognizing Spain’s weakened condition from occupation by Napoleon, the U.S. President James Madison and Congress declare the region for the United States — a move not recognized internationally.
1810 Cornelius Vanderbilt (1794-1877), at the age of 16, starts a business transporting people and then freight across the Hudson River and New York’s harbor in a small, two-masted sailboat. A revolution in transportation was about to begin and as an entrepreneur he would be a part of it.
1810 The ruler of Kauai cedes his island to Kamehameha. Kamehameha is now ruler of all of the Hawaiian Islands. In accordance with Hawaiian tradition he is considered divine and commoners prostrate themselves before him. 
1810 The Maryland legislature authorizes a lottery for the erection of a memorial to George Washington, a 188 foot Doric column in Baltimore’s Mt Vernon Place.
1810 Ephraim Basher (b.1744), NYC silversmith, died. He marked his pieces “EB” inside a square or an oval.
1810 Salzburg, Austria was annexed by Bavaria during the Napoleonic Wars and the Univ. of Salzburg was suspended.
1810 In Bristol, England, the Commercial Rooms were constructed under architect C.A. Busby.
1810 The British Bullion Committee pronounced that it was folly to let governments print as much money as they wanted and not expect inflation.
1810 Peter Durand, a British merchant, was granted a patent by King George III for his idea of preserving food in “vessels of glass, pottery, tin (tin can), or other metals or fit materials.”
1810 Sake Dean Mahomed founded the Hindoostane Coffee House, London’s first known curry establishment. Born in Patna, India in 1759, Mahomed was also the first known Indian to write a book in English. Published in 1786, it describes his adventures as a soldier with the East India Company’s army, his journey to Europe, his marriage to an Irish woman and their move to London.
1810 The British wrestled Mauritius from France. Indians were brought in as indentured laborers and later waves of Chinese immigrants arrived.
1810 A typhoon devastated the Caroline Islands, 500 miles south of the Marianas. The survivors sailed to Guam but only half survived. Spanish authorities sent the Carolinians to Saipan and Tinian to manage the Spanish cattle herds.
1810 A German folk tale appeared in “Gespensterbuch” (The Book of Ghosts), which formed the basis for the 1821 opera “Der Freishutz” (The Free-Shooter) by Carl Maria von Weber. In 1991 American writer William Burroughs wrote “The Black Rider,” an English version of the story with music by Tom Waits.
1810 In Germany Friedrich Wilhelm III began the construction of Museum Island in Berlin.
1810 In Germany construction of the first brew kettle at the Hallerbräustadel, the “factory,” as it is called in the books, that Gabriel Sedlmayr leased in 1808 at the west end of the Neuhauserstraße. The kettle is only used to refine vinegar. Today at this site stands the Hertie department store.
1810 Wilhelm von Humboldt founded Humboldt University in Berlin to give students a broad humanist education.
1810 Juan Jose de los Reyes Martinez, miner and revolutionary hero (El Pipila), joined some 20,000 rebels who stormed Guanajuato, Mexico, and cornered Spanish colonists inside a granary. Martinez set fire to the granary and died in the flames.
1810 Saartjie Baartman (~21) left South Africa with 2 white men who promised to make her rich. [see 1816]
1810 In Spain General Count Hugo, the father of Victor Hugo, governed Central Spain during the Peninsula War. He exterminated guerrillas and nailed up their severed heads.
1810-1811 The Duke of Wellington has the Lines of Torres Vedras heavily fortified and blocks all French movement forcing them to slow starvation during this winter. The resulting French retreat is considered the turning point of the Peninsular Campaign.
1810-1813 Boston-based whalers slaughtered an estimated 150,000 fur seals on the Farallon Islands, 28 miles west of San Francisco. Russian hunters followed and occupied the islands for the next 25 years during which they wiped out the remaining fur seals. Fur seals began to return around 1977, but their first pup wasn’t born until 1996.
1810-1832 The 54-mile Göta Canal was built to connect Sweden’s east and west coasts to circumvent Danish shipping controls between the Baltic and North Seas. The project was conceived and led by Count Baltzar von Platen (d.1830).
1810-1857 Alfred de Musset, French author: “How glorious it is — and also how painful — to be an exception.”
1810-1860 Theodore Parker, American religious leader: “Religion without joy—it is no religion.”
1810-1862 The Regency Period in English architecture. Oriental curves and cupolas influenced English architecture.
1810-1891 PT Barnum (Phineas Taylor Barnum), US showman and founder of “The Greatest Show On Earth.” He established his circus in 1871. He served in the Connecticut State House of Representatives for 2 terms, was mayor of Bridgeport, and was the first president of Bridgeport Hospital. “More persons, on the whole, are humbugged by believing nothing, than by believing too much.”
1810-1893 Ferenc Erkel, Hungarian composer, founder of the Nationalist school. His works include The Festive Overture.

TWO PEAS IN A POD

That’s right, today is the first week that it is available. Kindle’s today, and then in a week or so, you can have it in your hands physically if you so desire in Trade Paperback form as the other releases from our publisher, Regency Assembly Press does.

This release the publisher is trying out the Kindle Select program so it is exclusive to Amazon for 90 days. What that means for you, a reader, is that should you have

1) a Kindle

2) Are a member of Amazon Prime

then you can borrow the book, free to you, and try before you buy (always, please buy.)

For myself and Regency Assembly Press it is an experiment. RAP (And we hope you all are RAPpers and not RAPscallions) wants to see if this will work. They have also reduced the price of this book to half of what RAP books sell for. $3.99 for an electronic copy.

If you do not have an actual Kindle, Amazon has made it possible to read this book on virtually any electronic device. GO HERE if you want to get a copy for something other than a Kindle, or wait patiently until right before Thanksgiving (November 15th) when it will be released in all other digital formats.

Here is a picture, which of course you can click on to go fetch the book:

TwoPeasinaPod_DavidWilkin_Amazon.com_KindleStore-2012-08-27-08-02.jpg

TWO PEAS IN A POD

978-0-9829989-3-9

Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

Available in other digital formats on 11/15/2012

Again on sale today for $3.99

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Giveaway

My thought is to run this for a week and announce our winner next Monday, the 3rd. (Labor Day in the United States.)

This time around we are giving away an eBook of our newest release:

TWO PEAS IN A POD

TwoPeasinaPod_DavidWilkin_Amazon.com_KindleStore-2012-08-28-09-20.jpg

TWO PEAS IN A POD

978-0-9829989-3-9

Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

Even though it is released in .mobi for the Kindle, I of course have the ability to send it to you in all formats for your eReaders and computers.

How to win

But to enter the contest I should like some interaction.

1) One favorite word from the Lexicon which you can see each separate letter here in the Blog by looking at previous days postings, or go to the entire lexicon at the Regency Assembly Press website, here (Regency Lexicon)

2) (Optional) Your name of course (if you are registered and signed into WordPress then I can click back to you if you are the winner, but if you are not,) and an email or some way to get you the prize!

3) (Optional) And if you are super proactive, what eBook format you would need should you be our winner!

4) (Really Optional) Regular followers of my Blog will know about Jane Austen and Ghosts, one of our other novels. As Jane deals with old B Horror Movie legends in Jane Austen and Ghosts, we would like the name of a B movie legend (and please let us try not to repeat since it will be fun to see how many we can come up with. So to start off, I will give one as an example, Boris Karloff)

Read Full Post »

As with the other timeline posts, there are so many graphics, and WordPress just doesn’t format tables very well, so I need to direct you to the website for this.

1801 however is now up with nearly 100 graphics.

TheRegencyEraTimeline-2012-08-27-08-00.jpg

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Timeline

Each time I start a year, I have already compiled a list, months ago with about 6000 entered of what happened from 1788 to 1837. My first step now (It took several trials to get this down to a science) is to cut out the specific year I will work on and paste it into its own spreadsheet to work with. When I worked on the entire spreadsheet, sometimes inserting a line, with all the graphics I had begun to place, took a long time. Working on each year alone, is a lot faster.

With the year separated out, I now turn to my book sources,

The Timetables of History by Grun and Stein1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-26-08-02.jpg

Chronology of CULTURE by Paxton and Fairfield

1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-26-08-02.jpg What Happened When by Carruth.

PastedGraphic-2012-08-26-08-02.jpg, History of the World. A beautiful Dorling Kindersley book.

I now and diligently look through each of these to find entries that I did not come across on the internet, and other printed lists. It is possible that there are places that have more listings for each year. I have not found them. And when you go to the Timelines at the Regency Assembly Press page, there you will see all the graphical references as well. Something that I did not find anywhere else.

Here is the start of 1809:

Year Month Day Event
1809 Jan 4 Louis Braille (d.1852), inventor of a universal reading system for the blind, was born in Coupvray, France.
1809 Jan 19 Edgar Allan Poe (d.1949), American writer, was born in Boston. His father, David Poe, was an Irish-American actor and abandoned his family shortly after Edgar’s birth. His mother, Elizabeth Arnold Hopkins, died in 1811 and he grew up with a foster family. Poe studied briefly at the University of Virginia, but then he quarreled with his foster father and went to Boston in 1827, where he published his first volume of poetry anonymously. In the early 1840s Poe became known for his lyrical, brooding poems and detective stories, such as “The Gold Bug” and “Murders at the Rue Morgue.” In fact, he is recognized as the father of the modern detective story. Poe was unafraid to criticize literary practices of the time, stressing the importance of artistic value more than moral value. After battles with alcoholism and his wife Virginia’s illness and death, Poe became depressed but continued to write. He became engaged again in 1849 but soon died at the age of 40. His best known stories include: “Fall of the House of Usher ” and “The Tell-Tale Heart.” His most famous poems are “The Raven” and Annabel Lee.” “I hold that a long poem does not exist. I maintain that the phrase, ‘a long poem,’ is simply a flat contradiction in terms.”
1809 Jan 20 The 1st US geology book was published by William Maclure.
1809 January January: Ackermann’s Repository of Arts begins publication.
1809 January January: Sir John Moore’s demoralized forces stagger into Corunna, face attack from Marshall Soult’s troops, and are finally bundled onto transports back to England. Moore is killed in the battle. The failed campaign is a major political embarrassment to the British government.
1809 January January: The Treaty of the Dardanelles is signed between Britain and the Ottoman Empire, affirming thatno warship of any nation may enter the Straits of the Dardanelles and the Bosphorus. The treaty is aimed implicitly against Russia, whose Black Sea fleet poses a threat to Britain in the Mediterranean, and it pledges British support for Constantinople in the event of a French declaration of war against the Turks.
1809 Feb 3 US Congress passed an act establishing the Illinois Territory.
1809 Feb 4 Louis Braille was born. He was blinded at age four as the result of an accident in his father’s shop. Nevertheless, he became an accomplished organist and cellist and won a scholarship in 1819 to attend the National Institute for Blind Youth in Paris. At age 15, Louis witnessed a demonstration there by Charles Barbier, a soldier who had invented “night writing,” a system of letters embossed on cardboard for silent communication along trenches. While Barbier’s system was too complex to be practical, Braille simplified and adapted it to a six-dot code representing letters that enabled people with impaired vision to not only read but also write for themselves. In 1827, the first Braille book was published, but Braille himself died of tuberculosis at age 43–before his system gained widespread acceptance.
1809 Feb 11 Robert Fulton patented the steamboat.
1809 Feb 12 Charles Robert Darwin (d.1882) was born. He proposed that evolution was the principle that underlay the development of all species and that man, an animal, had evolved from nonhuman ancestors. Shortly after his graduation from Cambridge, Darwin sailed as a naturalist with the surveying ship HMS Beagle. All life, he said, is a struggle for existence and some species are better able to adapt to the environment and survive to pass along their characteristics. During the five-year voyage, Darwin’s observations of wildlife led to the writing of his 1859 book “The Origin of the Species,” in which he proposed the theory of natural selection. Besides the “Origin of the Species,” he wrote three books on geology and devoted 8 years to his monograph on barnacles. His last book was “The Formation of Vegetable Mould Through the Action of Worms.” In 1871 Darwin wrote “Descent of Man,” which demonstrated that man and ape could have had a common ancestor. Darwin’s theories were highly controversial and unsettling to those who believed in creationism. Many Victorians condemned Darwin as blasphemous, but many important scientists of the day agreed with his theories. “How can anyone not see that all observation must be for or against some view if it is to be of any service.”
1809 Feb 12 Abraham Lincoln, 16th president of the US, was born in Hardin County (present-day Larue County), Kentucky. His father owned two 600-acre farms [time not given]. Lincoln was president of the United States during one of the most turbulent times in American history. Although roundly criticized during his own time, he is recognized as one of history’s greatest figures who preserved the Union during the Civil War and proved that democracy could be a lasting form of government. Lincoln entered national politics as a Whig congressman from Illinois, but he lost his seat after one term due to his unpopular position on the Mexican War and the extension of slavery into the territories. The 1858 Lincoln-Douglas debates for the Senate gave him a national reputation. In 1860, Lincoln became the first president elected from the new Republican Party. Abraham Lincoln was fatally shot by John Wilkes Booth at Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C., on April 14, 1865. In 1996 a new biography of Abraham Lincoln by David Donald was published.
1809 Feb 15 Cyrus Hall McCormick (d.1884), inventor of the mechanical reaper, was born.
1809 Feb 20 The Supreme Court ruled that the power of the federal government is greater than that of any individual state.
1809 February February: Austria declares war on France.
1809 February February: Robert Fulton patents the steamboat.
1809 February February: The Second Siege of Saragossa comes to an end when the Spanish finally surrender to French forces after what is considered one of the most brutal battles of the Napoleonic wars. Most of the city lay in ruins, and 54,000 people had perished in the siege.
1809 February February: The Theatre Royal, Drury Lane burns down.
1809 Mar 1 Embargo Act of 1807 was repealed and the Non-Intercourse Act signed.
1809 Mar 4 Madison became 1st President inaugurated in American-made clothes.
1809 Mar 12 Great Britain signed a treaty with Persia forcing the French out of the country.
1809 Mar 15 Joseph Jenkins Roberts, first president of Liberia, was born.
1809 Mar 27 Georges-Eugene Haussmann (d.1891), French town planner, was born. He designed modern-day Paris.
1809 Mar 31 Edward Fitzgerald, American writer, was born. He is famous for writing “Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam.”
1809 Mar 31 Nikolai V. Gogol (d.1852), Ukrainian-born Russian writer, was born (NS) in Sorochyntsi, Poltava Governorate (later Ukraine). Some sources give April 1 as his birthday. His work included the play “The Inspector General” (1836) and the novels  “Taras Bulba” (1835) and “Dead Souls” (1842).
1809 Mar 31 Otto Jonas Lindblad, composer, was born.
1809 March March: England signs a treaty with Persia forcing the French out of the country.
1809 March March: James Madison becomes fourth President of the United States.
1809 March March: Soult captures Oporto.
1809 March March: The Duke of York resigns as Commander-in-Chief of the British Army when his mistress, Mary Anne Clarke, is accused of illegally selling army commisions under his aegis.
1809 March March: The Quarterly Review begins pubication.
1809 Apr 10 Austria declared war on France and her forces entered Bavaria.
1809 Apr 20 Napoleon defeated Austria at Battle of Abensberg, Bavaria.
1809 Apr 22 At the Battle at Eckmahl Napoleon beat Austrian archduke Karl.
1809 Apr 23 Eugene-Prosper Prevost, composer, was born.
1809 April April: Arthur Wellesley returns to Portugal to command the Anglo-Portuguese forces.
1809 April April: Napoleon defeats the Austrians in the Battle of Abensberg, Bavaria and again at the Battle of Eckmühl.
1809 April April: Wellesley drives Soult out of Oporto in one of the most brilliant operations of his military career.
1809 May 5 Mary Kies was 1st woman issued a US patent (weaving straw).
1809 May 5 Citizenship was denied to Jews of Canton of Aargau, Switzerland.
1809 May 12 Napoleon’s troops captured Vienna, Austria.
1809 May 17 The Papal States were annexed by France. Pope Pius VII responded by excommunicating Napoleon.
1809 May 24 Dartmoor Prison opened to house French prisoners of war.
1809 May 31 Composer Franz Joseph Haydn died in Vienna, Austria on his 77th birthday. When Napoleon’s armies marched into Vienna, the commanding general posted guards in front of Haydn’s house to protect Haydn from trouble, and a young officer was sent to sing for the old man.
1809 May May: Composer Franz Joseph Hadyn dies at age 77.
1809 May May: Dartmoor Prison opens in England to hold French prisoners of war.
1809 May May: Napoleon captures Vienna.
1809 May May: Napoleon orders the annexation of the Papal States to the French empire and announces the Pope’s secular power has ended. Pope Pius VII is imprisoned after he excommunicates the emperor.
1809 Jun 3 John “Christmas” Beckwith (58), composer, died.
1809 Jun 6 Sweden declared independence and a constitutional monarchy was established.
1809 Jun 8 Thomas Paine (b.1737), British born political essayist, died in poverty and obscurity in NYC at age 72. His revolutionary essays included “Common Sense” (1776) and “The Rights of Man” (1991) and “The Age of Reason.” His body was exhumed in 1819 by William Cobbett, shipped to England, and kept in an attic trunk till Cobbett died in 1835. Parts of his skeleton were later said to be sold at auction. In 2006 Craig Nelson authored “Thomas Paine” and Harvey J. Kaye authored “Thomas Paine and the Promise of America.”
1809 June June: Thomas Paine, pamphleteer, revolutionary, and author of Rights of Man, dies at age 72.
1809 Jul 3 Joseph Quesne (62), composer, died.
1809 Jul 5 Pope Pius VII was taken prisoner to France and held there until 1814.
1809 Jul 5 to Jul 6 Napoleon beat Austria’s archduke Charles at the Battle of Wagram. He annexed the Illyrian Provinces (now part of Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, and Montenegro), and abolished the Papal States.
1809 Jul 16 A well-prepared revolutionary insurrection burst out in La Paz, Bolivia.
1809 Jul 27 In Bolivia a proclamation of independence of the La Paz colony, said to have been written by Priest Medina and the first proclamation of that kind, was released and sent to the other main cities of the colony, hoping they would support the uprising.
1809 Jul 27 to Jul 28 Arthur Wellesley led the British army to triumph against the Spanish King Joseph Bonaparte at Talavera de la Reina against a French army twice his size. For this he was made Lord (the Duke of) Wellington.
1809 July July: Napoleon defeats the Austrian army at the Battle of Wagram.
1809 July July: Wellesley advances into Spain, joining forces with the Spanish army, under the command of General Gregorio de la Cuesta, at the Battle of Talavera. It is a decisive victory over the French, led by Joseph Bonaparte, and makes a hero of Wellesley at home. He is created Viscount Wellington.
1809 Aug 4 Hapsburg Emp. Francis I appointed Count Clemens von Metternich (36) minister of state.
1809 Aug 6 Alfred Lord Tennyson (d.1892), English poet laureate (1850), was born. His work included: “The Charge of the Light Brigade.” “Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers.”
1809 Aug 10 Ecuador struck its first blow for independence from Spain.
1809 Aug 29 Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., poet, essayist and father of Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., was born.
1809 August August: 40,000 British troops commanded by John Pitt, 2nd Earl of Chatham, attempt an unseccessful expedition to the Netherlands in the expensive Walcheren Campaign, intending to open up a second British front against France in mainland Europe to aid Austria. Little fighting occurs, and most of the 4000 British casualties are lost to fever (known as “Walcheren Fever”).
1809 Sep 27 Raphael Semmes (d.1877), Rear Admiral (Confederate Navy), was born.
1809 Sep The Old Price Riots broke out in England when Covent Garden manager John Philip Kemble raised ticket prices. The riots continued to December.
1809 September September: A new Royal Theatre at Covent Garden opens in London to replace the one destroyed by fire in 1808. Ticket price increases lead to the Old Price Riots which last for 64 days.
1809 4-Oct Prime Minister of the United Kingdom: Spencer Perceval
1809 Oct 8 Hapsburg Emp. Francis I appointed Count Clemens von Metternich (36) foreign minister of Austria.
1809 Oct 11 Meriwether Lewis committed suicide at 35. [see Oct 12]
1809 Oct 12 Meriwether Lewis, of the Lewis and Clark expedition, died under mysterious circumstances in St. Louis. [see Oct 11]
1809 Oct 14 The Treaty of Schönbrunn, also known as the Treaty of Vienna, ended hostilities between France and Austria. This treaty ended the Fifth Coalition during the Napoleonic Wars.
1809 Oct 22 Federico Ricci, composer, was born.
1809 Oct 27 President James Madison ordered the annexation of the western part of West Florida. Settlers there had rebelled against Spanish authority.
1809 October October: Spencer Perceval becomes Britain’s Prime Minister after the death of the Duke of Portland.
1809 Nov 13 John A.B. Dahlgren, US Union Lt Adm and inventor (Civil war Dahlgren cannon), was born.
1809 Nov 22 Peregrine Williamson of Baltimore patented a steel pen.
1809 Nov 27 Frances Anne “Fanny” Kemble (d.1893), Shakespearian actress, writer and anti-slavery activist, was born in London, England.  Her work included “Journal of a Residence on a Georgia Plantation. She died in London.
1809 Dec 9 William Barret Travis, Commander of the Texas troops at the battle of the Alamo, was born.
1809 Dec 16 Napoleon Bonaparte was divorced from the Empress Josephine by an act of the French Senate. Metternich had convinced Francis I of Austria to offer his daughter Marie Louise as a bride to Napoleon.
1809 Dec 24 Kit Carson, one of the most famous mountain men and scouts in the West, was born in Kentucky.
1809 Dec 29 William Gladstone (1809-1898), British statesman and four times Prime Minister from 1868-1894, was born. He was called the Grand Old Man of Victorian England. He began as a devout Tory but moved over to the liberal camp. A biography by Roy Jenkins, “Gladstone,” was published in 1995.
1809 Dec 30 Wearing masks at balls was forbidden in Boston.
1809 Dec In Danville, Kentucky, Dr. Ephraim McDowell (1771-1830) performed a successfully surgery on Jane Crawford (45) in which he removed an ovary and a large tumor with no anesthesia. Crawford lived to age 78 and was the world’s first known survivor of an elective exploration of the abdomen and removal of an ovary. The story was later told by David Dary in “Frontier Medicine: From the Atlantic to the Pacific 1492-1941” (2008).
1809 England’s Two Thousand Guineas race has its first running at Newmarket.
1809 The Bishop and His Clarke or a Peep Into Paradise by Thomas Rowlandson, 1809. The Duke of York (who also held the title Bishop of Osnabrück) is lampooned for succumbing to the demands of his mistress, Mary Anne Clarke. He says: “Ask anything in reason and you shall have it my dearest dearest dearest love.” She says: “Only remember the promotions I mentioned. I have pinned up the list at the head of the bed.”
1809

1809 Russia defeats Sweden. Sweden loses Finland, which becomes an autonomous Grand Duchy within Russia’s empire. Returning to the Hawaiian Islands from California and hoping for trade, Russians build a fort at Honolulu and try to establish themselves on the island of Kauai. They ignore Hawaiian customs and are driven out.  
1809 Napoleon is spread thin. The Austrians defeat him at the Battle of Aspern-Essling, and he loses his reputation for invincibility. The Austrians fail to follow up on their victory. Napoleon organizes an assault and defeats the Austrians. The Austrians make peace with Napoleon. 
1809 Napoleon’s economic blockade is not working. Britain’s exports reach an all-time high.
1809 William Cave created his painting “The Trusty Servant,” a uniformed pig with a padlocked mouth.
1809 Lamarck wrote his classic “Philosophie zoologique.” In 1997 this edition was valued at $3,500-$5,000.
1809 Boston’s Exchange Coffee House, which also contained a hotel and offices, opened and was said to be the largest building in the country. It burned down in 1818.
1809 Elizabeth Bayley Seton founded the Roman Catholic Sisters of Charity. She was later made a Catholic saint.
1809 Thomas Leiper laid the first railroad track in the US at Crum Creek, Pa. They were wooden.
1809 Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), US president (1801-1809) retired to Monticello, Va.
1809 Connecticut Sen. James Hillhouse proposed a constitutional amendment under which the president would be elected by lot from among the senators.
1809 Meriwether Lewis died of gunshot wounds near present-day Hohenwald, Tenn. It was uncertain whether he was killed or committed suicide.
1809 Bourne’s Pottery in Denby, Derbyshire, England, dates to this time. In 1850 it began using the J. Bourne & Son mark.
1809 Nicholas Appert won a French prize of 12,000 francs for his method of keeping food in glass bottles. Napoleon had offered the prize with military needs in mind.
1809 Lord Byron (1788-1824) traveled to Spain, Albania and Greece with John Cam Hobhouse and soon met with Ali Pasha.
1809 King Kamehameha conquered and unified all the Hawaiian islands.
1809 Sibbet House at 26 Northumberland St. was constructed in a Georgian design in Edinburgh, Scotland.
1809 Russia took the Aland island group from the Swedes and held it until the Russian Revolution.
1809-1817 James Madison served as President of the US.
1809-1826 Civilians and soldiers who returned home from Napoleon’s expedition to Egypt (1798-1801) published during this period in serial form “Description de l’Egypte” (The Description of Egypt), the most comprehensive view of Egypt to date.
1809-1891 Alexander William Kinglake, English historian.
1809-1894 Tryon Edwards, American clergyman: “One of the great lessons the fall of the leaf teaches, is this: Do your work well and then be ready to depart when God shall call.”
1809-1894 Oliver Wendell Holmes, American author: “A man may fulfill the object of his existence by asking a question he cannot answer, and attempting a task he cannot achieve.”
1809-1917 Finland was an autonomous grand duchy under the Czar of Russia.

TWO PEAS IN A POD

That’s right, today is the first week that it is available. Kindle’s today, and then in a week or so, you can have it in your hands physically if you so desire in Trade Paperback form as the other releases from our publisher, Regency Assembly Press does.

This release the publisher is trying out the Kindle Select program so it is exclusive to Amazon for 90 days. What that means for you, a reader, is that should you have

1) a Kindle

2) Are a member of Amazon Prime

then you can borrow the book, free to you, and try before you buy (always, please buy.)

For myself and Regency Assembly Press it is an experiment. RAP (And we hope you all are RAPpers and not RAPscallions) wants to see if this will work. They have also reduced the price of this book to half of what RAP books sell for. $3.99 for an electronic copy.

If you do not have an actual Kindle, Amazon has made it possible to read this book on virtually any electronic device. GO HERE if you want to get a copy for something other than a Kindle, or wait patiently until right before Thanksgiving (November 15th) when it will be released in all other digital formats.

Here is a picture, which of course you can click on to go fetch the book:

TwoPeasinaPod_DavidWilkin_Amazon.com_KindleStore-2012-08-26-08-02.jpg

TWO PEAS IN A POD

978-0-9829989-3-9

Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

Available in other digital formats on 11/15/2012

Again on sale today for $3.99

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Long Live Ruritania!

I hope many of you already know about Ruritania. I have blogged about it before. It is the country that The Prisoner of Zenda 51RcgGgZclL._BO2%25252C204%25252C203%25252C200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click%25252CTopRight%25252C35%25252C-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.yqqGlLNydzRb-2012-08-25-08-05.jpg is a prisoner in. It started an entire sub genre. And a few years back, as I started to think of The Prize is not as Great as you Think, and began my research, I found that I was writing in the genre. Now I can bore my friends after talking about the genre, and how I found it within a few minutes.

That doesn’t mean there are not other lovers of this genre, and perhaps others who have not even really realized that they love it. Only knowing that they like what they have read, or seen of it and did not realize that this was a genre.

I have started a list of novels in the genre, and I have been surprised that I have read so many already. I intend to read as many more as I can. If you know of others, please contribute to the list. I do not include, comics or movies, such as The Great Race 51IzjwrXmfL._SL500_AA300_.qHS68Sdxe36A-2012-08-25-08-05.jpg . Jack Lemmon did a turn as Prince Hoepnick.

The list of Ruritanian Romance Novels

Book Author Country
The Prisoner of Zenda Anthony Hope Ruritania
Rupert of Hentzau Anthony Hope Ruritania
The Mad King Edgar Rice Burroughs Lutha
The Prince Commands Andre Norton
Prince Otto Robert Louis Stevenson
Graustark George Barr McCutcheon Graustark
Beverly of Graustark George Barr McCutcheon Graustark
Truxton King: A Story of Graustark George Barr McCutcheon Graustark
The Prince of Graustark George Barr McCutcheon Graustark
East of the Setting Sun George Barr McCutcheon Graustark
The Inn of the Hawk and Raven George Barr McCutcheon Graustark
The Dark Frontier Eric Ambler Ixania
Blood Royal Domford Yates Riechtenburg
Fire Below Domford Yates Riechtenburg
Royal Flash George MacDonald Fraser Duchy of Strackenz
Castle Gay John Buchan Evallonia
The House of the Four Winds John Buchan Evallonia
The Lost Prince Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Mouse that Roared Leonard Wibberley Duchy of Grand Fenwick
Royal Seduction Jennifer Blake Ruthenia
Royal Passion Jennifer Blake Ruthenia
Savrola Winston Churchill Laurania
Long Live the King Mary Roberts Rinehart Livonia
The Black Riders Violet Needham
A Princess of Servia Bessie Marchant Servia
Royal Highness Thomas Mann Grimmburg
The Rose and the Ring William Makepeace Thackeray Paflagonia

From Wikipedia these thoughts “Hope’s novels resulted in “Ruritania” becoming a generic term for any small, imaginary, Victorian or Edwardian Era, European kingdom used as the setting for romance, intrigue and the plots of adventure novels.” and “Such stories are typically swashbuckling adventure novels, tales of high romance and intrigue, centered on the upper classes, aristocracy and royalty. The themes of honor, loyalty, and love predominate, and the books frequently feature the restoration of kings to their thrones.

That sounds right up my alley. Not to say I am bored writing Regency. I have written several of those and they are in various states of draft thru publication. But I did write The Prize is not as Great as you Think, and it is ready to be completed and published. That has led me to think it is also time to write the first draft of another, and perhaps create several.

That part of swashbuckling and adventure is waiting to be explored where Regencies are so much about Boy meets Girl, and then loses and finds their way back to each other. Here I can craft more intrigue. In Regencies, especially series, after awhile, when the author wants to graft Intrigue, we visit with Lord Castlereagh PastedGraphic-2012-08-25-08-05.jpg and make our hero a spy. There are so many Regency spies now, that there was no way that the French could ever have won the war. Why, I am sure there have been more spies created working for Lord Castlereagh then all the officers who served under Wellington.

If I write in the Ruritanian Romance Genre I do not need worry about such bending of History. The entire genre does that. The entire genre is a fictitious Historical novel.

Talk to Me

I very much would like to hear what others think, and as I said, if you know of novels that are Ruritanian Romance specific to be included in the list, please email, or comment. I will gladly add to the list. Maybe even make it available to Wikipedia.

The Next Thing

To carry this out, and of course as a follower here you may have been expecting something Regency, and certainly something historical, I am going to be changing things up again. For months I have been crafting history and mainly that of the Regency Era first.

I have mentioned my novel The Prize… and now it is time to bring it to my audience. To ready it for publication. A goal for 2012. To aid in doing this I will be releasing a chapter a week here on the blog. (The first on September 5th) A serialized version, at the end of which, it will have been edited and then I will release for publication. I may even make a KickStarter project of the entire event, calculating the cost of professional copyediting and a new cover commissioned for the piece, interior illustrations for the chapters and contributors.

One thing that will become apropos while doing this project will be working on the Late Victorian, Edwardian timelines, which I will do once the Regency timelines have finished.

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