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Archive for January, 2013

Jane Austen and Ghosts.

Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but this can take a humorous turn. Some years back, I am sure readers of this blog will be aware that some writers began to take great liberty with Jane Austen and her works. Pride and Prejudice being liberally rewritten with the inclusion of zombies. Then other books appeared with sea monsters, and werewolves and vampires. President Lincoln has even made it to the big screen where he is intent on sending foul creatures to hell.

It occurred to me, even before I read any of this literature, that Jane would probably not appreciate what had been done to her classic piece. That the tales and her life have become visual spectacles that we enjoy she might not like either, but is perhaps resigned to. That zombies, ghosts and vampires are now used to follow her own plot lines would I think, have her turning over in her grave. Jane Austen and Ghosts is my take on that.

It is now available in a variety of formats. For $4.99 for your eReaders and $8.99for paperback you can get this Jane Austen adventure.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

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Amazon for your Kindle and in Paperback

In the world of moviemaking, nothing is as golden as rebooting a classic tale that has made fortunes every time before when it has been adapted for the silver screen. Certainly any work by Jane Austen made into a movie will not only be bankable, but also considered a work of art.

That is of course until the current wave of adaptations that unite her classic stories with all the elements of the afterlife is attempted to be created. That these have found success in the marketplace amongst booklovers may not be quite understood by those who make movies. But that they are a success is understood and a reason to make them into movies.

All that being said, perhaps it would also be fair to say that the very proper Jane, were she present to have anything to say about it, would not be pleased. Of course she has been away from this Earth for nearly 200 hundred years. But does that mean were she upset enough, she wouldn’t come back?

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If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it ;-) then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Colonel William Baillie
Died November 13th 1782

Baillie entered the service of the East India Company on October 18, 1759 as a lieutenant in the Infantry at Madras. He was brevet Captain on September 5th 1765, Captain on April 2nd 1764, Major April 12th 1772 and then Lieutenant Colonel December 29th, 1775.

He was noted for his service under Colonel Joseph Smith in the operations against Hyder Ali in 1767 and 1768. He commanded at Pondicherry during the action against the French in 1779 and in 1780 was noted for his work in Northern Circars with 2 companies of European infantry, two batteries of artillery and five battalions of native infantry.

In 1780 when Hyder Ali swooped down on the Carnatic he was ordered to unite his force with the army collecting at Madras, first under Lord Macleod and then Sir Hector Munro. Baillie defeated Hyder’s son, Tipu Sultan on his way. When fourteen miles from the main force, Baillie’s losses forced him to halt his march. Munro (DWW-in typical british officer fashion) sent only a small force to help Baillie and here on September 10th 1780 all of Hyder Ali’s host (DWW-initially 100,000) came at them. The Camp followers (DWW-they were a large part of an army on the march then) stampeded through the camp causing confusion, and the natives could not be rallied.

Baillie did his best to rally after many charges, but soon all the officers were either dead or wounded and only 16 soldiers in the square remained unhurt. Now all who remained alive were carried off to Seringapatam, including Captain David Baird. Colonel Baillie’s courage was noted by friend and foe during the action and subsequent captivity. The captivity was to last for four years. Baillie died whilst still a prisoner.

Previous Notables (Click to see the Blog):

George III George IV Georgiana Cavendish
William IV Lady Hester Stanhope Lady Caroline Lamb
Princess Charlotte Queen Charlotte Charles James Fox
Queen Adelaide Dorothea Jordan Jane Austen
Maria Fitzherbert Lord Byron John Keats
Princess Caroline Percy Bysshe Shelley Cassandra Austen
Edmund Kean Thomas Clarkson Sir John Moore
John Burgoyne William Wilberforce Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Sarah Siddons Josiah Wedgwood Emma Hamilton
Hannah More John Phillip Kemble John Jervis, Earl St. Vincent
Ann Hatton Stephen Kemble Mary Robinson
Harriet Mellon Zachary Macaulay George Elphinstone
Thomas Babington George Romney Mary Moser
Ozias Humphry William Hayley Daniel Mendoza
Edward Pellew Angelica Kauffman Sir William Hamilton
David Garrick Pownoll Bastard Pellew Charles Arbuthnot
William Upcott William Huskisson Dominic Serres
Sir George Barlow Scrope Davies Charles Francis Greville
George Stubbs Fanny Kemble Thomas Warton
William Mason Thomas Troubridge Charles Stanhope
Robert Fulke Greville Gentleman John Jackson Ann Radcliffe
Edward ‘Golden Ball’ Hughes John Opie Adam Walker
John Ireland Henry Pierrepoint Robert Stephenson
Mary Shelley Sir Joshua Reynolds Francis Place
Richard Harding Evans Lord Thomas Foley Francis Burdett
John Gale Jones George Parker Bidder Sir George Warren
Edward Eliot William Beechey Eva Marie Veigel
Hugh Percy-Northumberland Charles Philip Yorke Lord Palmerston
Samuel Romilly John Petty 2nd Marquess Lansdowne Henry Herbert Southey
Stapleton Cotton Colin Macaulay Amelia Opie
Sir James Hall Henry Thomas Colebrooke Maria Foote
Sir David Baird Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville Dr. Robert Gooch

There will be many other notables coming, a full and changing list can be found here on the blog as I keep adding to it. The list so far is:

Astley Cooper
Captain William Baillie (Engraver)
William Baillie (artist)
Benjamin Travers
Home Popham
Sir Ralph Abercromby
Sir Hector Munro
James Kenney
Elizabeth Inchbald
George Colman the Younger
Thomas Morton
John Liston
Tyrone Power
Colonel William Berkeley
Barry Proctor
William Henry West Betty
Sir George Colebrooke
Joseph John Gurney
John Playfair
James Hutton
Robert Emmet
William Taylor of Norwich
Sir William Knighton
John Romilly
Sir John Herschel
John Horne Tooke
James Mill
Edward Hall Alderson
Henry Perronet Briggs
Robert Owen
Jeremy Bentham
Joseph Hume
Sir Walter Scott
Charles Lamb
John Stuart Mill
Thomas Cochrane
James Paull
Claire Clairmont
William Lovett
Sir John Vaughan
Fanny Imlay
William Godwin
Mary Wollstonecraft
General Sir Robert Arbuthnot
Harriet Fane Arbuthnot
Joseph Antonio Emidy
James Edwards (Bookseller)
William Gifford
John Wolcot (Peter Pindar)
Sir Joseph Banks
Richard Porson
Edward Gibbon
James Smithson
William Cowper
Richard Cumberland
Richard Cosway
Jacob Phillipp Hackert
John Thomas Serres
Wellington (the Military man)
Horatio Nelson
William Vincent
Cuthbert Collingwood
Admiral Sir Graham Moore
Admiral Sir William Sydney Smith
Admiral Sir Joseph Sydney Yorke
Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville
Howe
Viscount Hood
Thomas Hope
Baroness de Calabrella
Thomas Babington Macaulay
Harriet Martineau
Napoleon Bonaparte
Packenham
Admiral Israel Pellew
General Banastre Tarleton
Henry Paget
Francis Leggatt Chantrey
Sir Charles Grey
Thomas Picton
Constable
Thomas Lawrence
James Northcote
Cruikshank
Thomas Gainsborough
James Gillray
George Stubbs
Joseph Priestley
William Aubrey de Vere Beauclerk 9th Duke of St. Albans
Horace Walpole
John Thomas ‘Antiquity’ Smith
Thomas Coutts
Angela Burdett-Coutts
Sir Anthony Carlisle
Rowlandson
William Blake
Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Sir Marc Brunel
Marquis of Stafford Granville Leveson-Gower
Marquis of Stafford George Leveson-Gower
George Stephenson
Nicholas Wood
Edward Pease
Thomas Telford
Joseph Locke
Paul III Anton, Prince Esterházy
Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton
John Nash
Matthew Gregory Lewis
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Robert Southey
Thomas Hope
Henry Holland
Sir Walter Scott
Lord Elgin
Henry Moyes
Jeffery Wyatville
Hester Thrale
William Windham
Madame de Stael
Joseph Black
John Walker
James Boswell
Edward John Eliot
Edward James Eliot
Edward Law, 1st Baron Ellenborough
George Combe
William Harrison Ainsworth
Sir Harry Smith
Thomas Cochrane
Warren Hastings
Edmund Burke
William Petty
Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice
Thomas Douglas, 5th Earl of Selkirk
Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond
Juana Maria de Los Dolores de Leon (Lady Smith)
Duke of Argyll, George William Campbell (1766-1839)
Lord Barrymore, Richard Barry (1769-1794)
Lord Bedford, Francis Russell (1765-1802)
Mr. G. Dawson Damer (1788-1856)
Duke of Devonshire, William Cavendish (1748-1811)
Colonel George Hanger (c.1751-1824)
Lord Hertford, Francis Seymour-Ingram (1743-1822)
Lord Yarmouth, Francis Charles Seymour-Ingram (1777-1842)
Earl of Jersey, George Bussey Villiers (1735-1805)
Sir John , John Lade (1759-1838)
Duke of Norfolk, Charles Howard (1746-1815)
Duke of York , Frederick Augustus Hanover (1763-1827)
Louis Philippe Joseph, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1785 as Duc d’ Orleans (1747-1793)
Louis Philippe, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1793 as Duc d’ Orleans (1773-1850)
Captain John (Jack) Willett Payne (1752-1803)
Duke of Queensberry, William Douglas (1724-1810)
Duke of Rutland, John Henry Manners(1778-1857)
Lord Sefton, William Philip Molyneux (1772-1838)
Admiral Lord Hugh Seymour (1759-1801)
Sir Lumley St. George Skeffington Baronet (1771 – 1850)
Lord Worcester, Henry Somerset (1766-1835)
Lord Worcester, Henry Somerset (1792-1853)
Hon. Frederick Gerald aka “Poodle” Byng

The Dandy Club
Beau Brummell
William Arden, 2nd Baron Alvanley
Henry Mildmay

Patronesses of Almacks
Emily Lamb, Lady Cowper
Amelia Stewart, Viscountess Castlereagh
Sarah Villiers, Countess of Jersey
Maria Molyneux, Countess of Sefton
Mrs. Drummond Burrell
Dorothea Lieven, Countess de Lieven, wife of the Russian Ambassador
        Countess Esterhazy, wife of the Austrian Ambassador

If there are any requests for personalities to be added tot he list, just let us know in the comments section

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Colonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence
For your holiday enjoyment, one of the Regency Romances I published. It is available for sale and I hope that you will take the opportunity to order your copy for the holiday season. For yourself or as a gift.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For just a few dollars this Regency Romance can be yours for your eReaders or physically in Trade Paperback.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook or in Paperback

Smashwords

iBookstore

Amazon for your Kindle or in Trade Paperback
Witnessing his cousin marry for love and not money, as he felt destined to do, Colonel Fitzwilliam refused to himself to be jealous. He did not expect his acquaintance with the Bennet Clan to change that.

   Catherine Bennet, often called Kitty, had not given a great deal of thought to how her life might change with her sisters Elizabeth and Jane becoming wed to rich and connected men. Certainly meeting Darcy’s handsome cousin, a Colonel, did not affect her.

   But one had to admit that the connections of the Bingleys and Darcys were quite advantageous. All sorts of men desired introductions now that she had such wealthy new brothers.

   Kitty knew that Lydia may have thought herself fortunate when she had married Wickham, the first Bennet daughter to wed. Kitty, though, knew that true fortune had come to her. She just wasn’t sure how best to apply herself.

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If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Dr. Robert Gooch

June 1784 to February 16 1830

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Born at Great Yarmouth in Norfolk, son of a sea captain also named Robert and Grandson of Sir Thomas Gooch, an english Bishop. He was educated a private day school and then at fifteen apprenticed to Giles Borrettt who was surgeon-apothecary at Yarmouth. Gooch attended Horatio Nelson who came to visit the wounded from the battle of Copenhagen.

In 1804 he went to the University of Edinburgh and was friends with Henry Southey and William Knighton. He studied German at Norwich with William Taylor and became engaged to Emily Bolingbroke. He graduated with an MD in 1807 and then made his way to London to work with Astley Cooper and opened a general practice in 1808. He married his fiancee who died in 1811 along with their only child.

He left Croydon for Aldermanbury and came to know Robert Southey. He then became a licentiate of the Royal College of Physicians in 1812. Then became a lecturer on midwifery at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital. In 1814 he married the sister of Benjamin Travers and his practice on midwifery took off. Gooch’s health was poor though and he often had to stop his work. In 1826 he secure the post of librarian to the king. In 1830 he died of consumption, leaving two sons and a daughter.

He wrote his major work on the diseases peculiar to women.

Previous Notables (Click to see the Blog):

George III George IV Georgiana Cavendish
William IV Lady Hester Stanhope Lady Caroline Lamb
Princess Charlotte Queen Charlotte Charles James Fox
Queen Adelaide Dorothea Jordan Jane Austen
Maria Fitzherbert Lord Byron John Keats
Princess Caroline Percy Bysshe Shelley Cassandra Austen
Edmund Kean Thomas Clarkson Sir John Moore
John Burgoyne William Wilberforce Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Sarah Siddons Josiah Wedgwood Emma Hamilton
Hannah More John Phillip Kemble John Jervis, Earl St. Vincent
Ann Hatton Stephen Kemble Mary Robinson
Harriet Mellon Zachary Macaulay George Elphinstone
Thomas Babington George Romney Mary Moser
Ozias Humphry William Hayley Daniel Mendoza
Edward Pellew Angelica Kauffman Sir William Hamilton
David Garrick Pownoll Bastard Pellew Charles Arbuthnot
William Upcott William Huskisson Dominic Serres
Sir George Barlow Scrope Davies Charles Francis Greville
George Stubbs Fanny Kemble Thomas Warton
William Mason Thomas Troubridge Charles Stanhope
Robert Fulke Greville Gentleman John Jackson Ann Radcliffe
Edward ‘Golden Ball’ Hughes John Opie Adam Walker
John Ireland Henry Pierrepoint Robert Stephenson
Mary Shelley Sir Joshua Reynolds Francis Place
Richard Harding Evans Lord Thomas Foley Francis Burdett
John Gale Jones George Parker Bidder Sir George Warren
Edward Eliot William Beechey Eva Marie Veigel
Hugh Percy-Northumberland Charles Philip Yorke Lord Palmerston
Samuel Romilly John Petty 2nd Marquess Lansdowne Henry Herbert Southey
Stapleton Cotton Colin Macaulay Amelia Opie
Sir James Hall Henry Thomas Colebrooke Maria Foote
Sir David Baird Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville


There will be many other notables coming, a full and changing list can be found here on the blog as I keep adding to it. The list so far is:

Astley Cooper

Benjamin Travers

Home Popham

Colonel William Baillie
Sir Ralph Abercromby
Sir Hector Munro

James Kenney

Elizabeth Inchbald

George Colman the Younger

Thomas Morton

John Liston

Tyrone Power

Colonel William Berkeley

Barry Proctor

William Henry West Betty

Sir George Colebrooke

Joseph John Gurney

John Playfair

James Hutton

Robert Emmet

William Taylor of Norwich

Sir William Knighton

John Romilly

Sir John Herschel

John Horne Tooke

James Mill

Edward Hall Alderson

Henry Perronet Briggs

Robert Owen

Jeremy Bentham

Joseph Hume

Sir Walter Scott

Charles Lamb

John Stuart Mill

Thomas Cochrane

James Paull

Claire Clairmont

William Lovett

Sir John Vaughan

Fanny Imlay

William Godwin

Mary Wollstonecraft

General Sir Robert Arbuthnot

Harriet Fane Arbuthnot

Joseph Antonio Emidy
James Edwards (Bookseller)
William Gifford
John Wolcot (Peter Pindar)
Sir Joseph Banks
Richard Porson
Edward Gibbon
James Smithson
William Cowper
Richard Cumberland
Richard Cosway
Jacob Phillipp Hackert
John Thomas Serres
Wellington (the Military man)
Horatio Nelson
William Vincent
Cuthbert Collingwood
Admiral Sir Graham Moore
Admiral Sir William Sydney Smith
Admiral Sir Joseph Sydney Yorke
Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville
Howe
Viscount Hood
Thomas Hope
Baroness de Calabrella
Thomas Babington Macaulay
Harriet Martineau
Napoleon Bonaparte
Packenham
Admiral Israel Pellew
General Banastre Tarleton
Henry Paget
Francis Leggatt Chantrey
Sir Charles Grey
Thomas Picton
Constable
Thomas Lawrence
James Northcote
Cruikshank
Thomas Gainsborough
James Gillray
George Stubbs
Joseph Priestley
William Aubrey de Vere Beauclerk 9th Duke of St. Albans
Horace Walpole
John Thomas ‘Antiquity’ Smith
Thomas Coutts
Angela Burdett-Coutts
Sir Anthony Carlisle
Rowlandson
William Blake
Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Sir Marc Brunel
Marquis of Stafford Granville Leveson-Gower
Marquis of Stafford George Leveson-Gower
George Stephenson
Nicholas Wood
Edward Pease
Thomas Telford
Joseph Locke
Paul III Anton, Prince Esterházy
Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton
John Nash
Matthew Gregory Lewis
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Robert Southey
Thomas Hope
Henry Holland
Sir Walter Scott
Lord Elgin
Henry Moyes
Jeffery Wyatville
Hester Thrale
William Windham
Madame de Stael
Joseph Black
John Walker
James Boswell
Edward John Eliot
Edward James Eliot
Edward Law, 1st Baron Ellenborough
George Combe
William Harrison Ainsworth
Sir Harry Smith
Thomas Cochrane
Warren Hastings
Edmund Burke
William Petty
Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice
Thomas Douglas, 5th Earl of Selkirk
Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond
Juana Maria de Los Dolores de Leon (Lady Smith)
Duke of Argyll, George William Campbell (1766-1839)
Lord Barrymore, Richard Barry (1769-1794)
Lord Bedford, Francis Russell (1765-1802)
Mr. G. Dawson Damer (1788-1856)
Duke of Devonshire, William Cavendish (1748-1811)
Colonel George Hanger (c.1751-1824)
Lord Hertford, Francis Seymour-Ingram (1743-1822)
Lord Yarmouth, Francis Charles Seymour-Ingram (1777-1842)
Earl of Jersey, George Bussey Villiers (1735-1805)
Sir John , John Lade (1759-1838)
Duke of Norfolk, Charles Howard (1746-1815)
Duke of York , Frederick Augustus Hanover (1763-1827)
Louis Philippe Joseph, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1785 as Duc d’ Orleans (1747-1793)
Louis Philippe, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1793 as Duc d’ Orleans (1773-1850)
Captain John (Jack) Willett Payne (1752-1803)
Duke of Queensberry, William Douglas (1724-1810)
Duke of Rutland, John Henry Manners(1778-1857)
Lord Sefton, William Philip Molyneux (1772-1838)
Admiral Lord Hugh Seymour (1759-1801)
Sir Lumley St. George Skeffington Baronet (1771 – 1850)
Lord Worcester, Henry Somerset (1766-1835)
Lord Worcester, Henry Somerset (1792-1853)
Hon. Frederick Gerald aka “Poodle” Byng

The Dandy Club
        Beau Brummell
        William Arden, 2nd Baron Alvanley
        Henry Mildmay

Patronesses of Almacks
        Emily Lamb, Lady Cowper
        Amelia Stewart, Viscountess Castlereagh
        Sarah Villiers, Countess of Jersey
        Maria Molyneux, Countess of Sefton
        Mrs. Drummond Burrell
        Dorothea Lieven, Countess de Lieven, wife of the Russian Ambassador
        Countess Esterhazy, wife of the Austrian Ambassador

If there are any requests for personalities to be added tot he list, just let us know in the comments section

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Trolling’s Pass and Present
Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but I also have delved into Fantasy. The Trolling series, (the first three are in print) is the story of a man, Humphrey. We meet him as he has left youth and become a man with a man’s responsibilities. We follow him in a series of stories that encompass the stages of life. We see him when he starts his family, when he has older sons and the father son dynamic is tested. We see him when his children begin to marry and have children, and at the end of his life when those he has loved, and those who were his friends proceed him over the threshold into death.
All this while he serves a kingdom troubled by monsters. Troubles that he and his friends will learn to deal with and rectify.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For $3.99 you can get this fantasy adventure.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

Amazon for your Kindle
Years since their battles with the Trolls, even on foreign soil, the warriors of the Valley Kingdom of Torahn need something to keep their edge honed. The economy too is beginning to fray a little without the great wars to support. The Leaders hit upon the idea of searching for a path to reach the east side of the continent. The Elves swear that at one time their writings tell of such, the Dwarves swear such a pass across Teantellen is legendary.

Teantellen though is filled with races man has never gotten along with well. Goblins, Dark Elves, Trolls, Giants and Dragons. It has been years since the mountain tops exploded, and perhaps that has changed things enough that a way can be found to link the western lands with the eastern lands and increase trade, and prosperity for all.

Even should they fail in their quest, as the history of man has shown to this point in time, the attempt will do much to spur the economy. Tens of thousands of gold will be spent by the Council of Twenty-One to pay for such an expedition. Gold that those who are not so scrupulous might choose to pocket as they tried in the Troll Wars.

With such shenanigans taking place again, are the hopes of the previous generation, the leaders from the Troll Wars now in retirement, ready to be achieved? Is it time for Torahn, called the Valley Kingdom, but the only Kingdom without a King, to have a King once more?

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

Read Full Post »

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville, First Lord of the Admiralty

March 14 1771 to June 10 1851

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Dundas was born in Edinburg, the only son of Henry Dundas, the 1st Viscount Melville. He was educated there at the Royal High School and in 1786 went on a tour of the continent. He enrolled at the Gottingen University and then continued his studies at the Edinburgh University and at Emmanuel College, Cambridge. He was admitted to Lincoln’s Inn in 1788 and then became his father’s private secretary from 1794. He was also bought in as MP for Hastings in 1794 and then Rye in 1796. In 1796 he married the heiress Anne Saunders and took her name also. They had four sons and two daughters.

Dundas was appointed Keeper of the Signet for Scotland and elected MP for Midlothian in 1801. He did not speak in parliament until 1805 and 1806 in defense of his father who was being impeached. He was tested when trying to negotiate being left in charge in Scotland. He failed but he won respect. The Duke of Portland rewarded him with the presidency of the Board of Control for India in 1807.

His main task now was to frustrate Napoleon in his alliance with Russia from doing anything against India. Dundas courted the Shah in Persia against France. He formed alliances with Lahore and Kabul. He took over Portuguese factories in India and China, Java and French Mauritius and Reunion. Dundas also saw to the decline in the finances of the East India Company which was suffering because of the war. Having found that the privileges accorded the Company were inefficient, he wrote legislation that was adopted to change those privileges in the Companies charter.

Dundas was tasked in 1809 as Chief Secretary for Ireland, and then when Spencer Perceval succeeded Portland, he wanted to make Dundas Secretary for War. Dundas’ father did not wish this, and so the son returned to his duties at the Board of Control. The first Viscount died, and Robert became Viscount in May of 1811. In 1812 under Lord Liverpool, Dundas became First Lord of the Admiralty.

During the Napoleonic wars, as First Lord, he was to maintain British Supremacy on the seas. He saw that with France controlling the ports of Holland and Italy in early 1813, that the enemy would soon surpass Britain’s strength should the war continue. The Duke of Wellington noted that he too was having a problem with the convoys that were supplying him, much of that due to American privateers that now were enemies due to the outbreak of hostilities with that nation starting in 1812.

With the Peace between France and the sixth coalition, Britain drastically cut its Navy. But Britain was also now the only true colonial power. It really had increased needs to keep all its possessions across the globe connected. Dundas wanted 100 ships of the line to support this empire, and the cabinet wanted 44. Dundas now looked for every economy so he could maintain a fleet against such a foolish notion by the cabinet. He was successful, some of this due to improving ship design and durability. He however was against the introduction of steamers, believing it an infant technology that would unreliable and expensive. By the late 1820s he was able to see his fleet achieve parity with France and the United States’ new construction spending.

He had a great affinity still for Scotland while serving as First Lord. He was appointed a governor of the Bank of Scotland and elected chancellor of the University of St. Andrews in 1814. He was made a Knight of the Thistle in 1821. When George Canning succeeded Liverpool as Prime Minister, he left office but returned under Wellington and Sir Robert Peel. Again taking the positions he had held before, President of the Board of Control and First Lord of the Admiralty. The Reform act changed matters, and in 1830 he resigned office never to hold it again. His wife died in 1841, and he died ten years later at Melville Castle.

Previous Notables (Click to see the Blog):

George III George IV Georgiana Cavendish
William IV Lady Hester Stanhope Lady Caroline Lamb
Princess Charlotte Queen Charlotte Charles James Fox
Queen Adelaide Dorothea Jordan Jane Austen
Maria Fitzherbert Lord Byron John Keats
Princess Caroline Percy Bysshe Shelley Cassandra Austen
Edmund Kean Thomas Clarkson Sir John Moore
John Burgoyne William Wilberforce Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Sarah Siddons Josiah Wedgwood Emma Hamilton
Hannah More John Phillip Kemble John Jervis, Earl St. Vincent
Ann Hatton Stephen Kemble Mary Robinson
Harriet Mellon Zachary Macaulay George Elphinstone
Thomas Babington George Romney Mary Moser
Ozias Humphry William Hayley Daniel Mendoza
Edward Pellew Angelica Kauffman Sir William Hamilton
David Garrick Pownoll Bastard Pellew Charles Arbuthnot
William Upcott William Huskisson Dominic Serres
Sir George Barlow Scrope Davies Charles Francis Greville
George Stubbs Fanny Kemble Thomas Warton
William Mason Thomas Troubridge Charles Stanhope
Robert Fulke Greville Gentleman John Jackson Ann Radcliffe
Edward ‘Golden Ball’ Hughes John Opie Adam Walker
John Ireland Henry Pierrepoint Robert Stephenson
Mary Shelley Sir Joshua Reynolds Francis Place
Richard Harding Evans Lord Thomas Foley Francis Burdett
John Gale Jones George Parker Bidder Sir George Warren
Edward Eliot William Beechey Eva Marie Veigel
Hugh Percy-Northumberland Charles Philip Yorke Lord Palmerston
Samuel Romilly John Petty 2nd Marquess Lansdowne Henry Herbert Southey
Stapleton Cotton Colin Macaulay Amelia Opie
Sir James Hall Henry Thomas Colebrooke Maria Foote
Sir David Baird


There will be many other notables coming, a full and changing list can be found here on the blog as I keep adding to it. The list so far is:

Home Popham

Colonel William Baillie
Sir Ralph Abercromby
Sir Hector Munro

James Kenney

Elizabeth Inchbald

George Colman the Younger

Thomas Morton

John Liston

Tyrone Power

Colonel William Berkeley

Barry Proctor

William Henry West Betty

Sir George Colebrooke

Joseph John Gurney

John Playfair

James Hutton

Robert Emmet

William Taylor of Norwich

Sir William Knighton

Dr. Robert Gooch

John Romilly

Sir John Herschel

John Horne Tooke

James Mill

Edward Hall Alderson

Henry Perronet Briggs

Robert Owen

Jeremy Bentham

Joseph Hume

Sir Walter Scott

Charles Lamb

John Stuart Mill

Thomas Cochrane

James Paull

Claire Clairmont

William Lovett

Sir John Vaughan

Fanny Imlay

William Godwin

Mary Wollstonecraft

General Sir Robert Arbuthnot

Harriet Fane Arbuthnot

Joseph Antonio Emidy
James Edwards (Bookseller)
William Gifford
John Wolcot (Peter Pindar)
Sir Joseph Banks
Richard Porson
Edward Gibbon
James Smithson
William Cowper
Richard Cumberland
Richard Cosway
Jacob Phillipp Hackert
John Thomas Serres
Wellington (the Military man)
Horatio Nelson
William Vincent
Cuthbert Collingwood
Admiral Sir Graham Moore
Admiral Sir William Sydney Smith
Admiral Sir Joseph Sydney Yorke
Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville
Howe
Viscount Hood
Thomas Hope
Baroness de Calabrella
Thomas Babington Macaulay
Harriet Martineau
Napoleon Bonaparte
Packenham
Admiral Israel Pellew
General Banastre Tarleton
Henry Paget
Francis Leggatt Chantrey
Sir Charles Grey
Thomas Picton
Constable
Thomas Lawrence
James Northcote
Cruikshank
Thomas Gainsborough
James Gillray
George Stubbs
Joseph Priestley
William Aubrey de Vere Beauclerk 9th Duke of St. Albans
Horace Walpole
John Thomas ‘Antiquity’ Smith
Thomas Coutts
Angela Burdett-Coutts
Sir Anthony Carlisle
Rowlandson
William Blake
Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Sir Marc Brunel
Marquis of Stafford Granville Leveson-Gower
Marquis of Stafford George Leveson-Gower
George Stephenson
Nicholas Wood
Edward Pease
Thomas Telford
Joseph Locke
Paul III Anton, Prince Esterházy
Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton
John Nash
Matthew Gregory Lewis
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Robert Southey
Thomas Hope
Henry Holland
Sir Walter Scott
Lord Elgin
Henry Moyes
Jeffery Wyatville
Hester Thrale
William Windham
Madame de Stael
Joseph Black
John Walker
James Boswell
Edward John Eliot
Edward James Eliot
Edward Law, 1st Baron Ellenborough
George Combe
William Harrison Ainsworth
Sir Harry Smith
Thomas Cochrane
Warren Hastings
Edmund Burke
William Petty
Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice
Thomas Douglas, 5th Earl of Selkirk
Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond
Juana Maria de Los Dolores de Leon (Lady Smith)
Duke of Argyll, George William Campbell (1766-1839)
Lord Barrymore, Richard Barry (1769-1794)
Lord Bedford, Francis Russell (1765-1802)
Mr. G. Dawson Damer (1788-1856)
Duke of Devonshire, William Cavendish (1748-1811)
Colonel George Hanger (c.1751-1824)
Lord Hertford, Francis Seymour-Ingram (1743-1822)
Lord Yarmouth, Francis Charles Seymour-Ingram (1777-1842)
Earl of Jersey, George Bussey Villiers (1735-1805)
Sir John , John Lade (1759-1838)
Duke of Norfolk, Charles Howard (1746-1815)
Duke of York , Frederick Augustus Hanover (1763-1827)
Louis Philippe Joseph, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1785 as Duc d’ Orleans (1747-1793)
Louis Philippe, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1793 as Duc d’ Orleans (1773-1850)
Captain John (Jack) Willett Payne (1752-1803)
Duke of Queensberry, William Douglas (1724-1810)
Duke of Rutland, John Henry Manners(1778-1857)
Lord Sefton, William Philip Molyneux (1772-1838)
Admiral Lord Hugh Seymour (1759-1801)
Sir Lumley St. George Skeffington Baronet (1771 – 1850)
Lord Worcester, Henry Somerset (1766-1835)
Lord Worcester, Henry Somerset (1792-1853)
Hon. Frederick Gerald aka “Poodle” Byng

The Dandy Club
        Beau Brummell
        William Arden, 2nd Baron Alvanley
        Henry Mildmay

Patronesses of Almacks
        Emily Lamb, Lady Cowper
        Amelia Stewart, Viscountess Castlereagh
        Sarah Villiers, Countess of Jersey
        Maria Molyneux, Countess of Sefton
        Mrs. Drummond Burrell
        Dorothea Lieven, Countess de Lieven, wife of the Russian Ambassador
        Countess Esterhazy, wife of the Austrian Ambassador

If there are any requests for personalities to be added tot he list, just let us know in the comments section

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The Shattered Mirror
For your holiday enjoyment, one of the Regency Romances I published. It is available for sale and I hope that you will take the opportunity to order your copy for the holiday season. For yourself or as a gift.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For just a few dollars this Regency Romance can be yours for your eReaders or physically in Trade Paperback.

Screenshot12%25253A2%25253A124%25253A23PM-2013-01-29-08-38.jpeg

Barnes and Noble for your Nook

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iBookstore

Amazon for your Kindle and in Trade Paperback
Bridget Halifax-Stokes was giddy with the excitement of her season in London. Town had beckoned and her season came on the heels of the end of the war against the tyrant.

All the handsome men were returning heroes. What better year to come out. Her father thought it all nonsense. Her mother believed that it would be the best showing of any of her daughters.

More lords available and luck that Bridget was just the perfect age.

All is fun and frivolity until Bridget literally crashes into Sir Patrick Hampton as he limps along the high street.

A man she knew once well, now a stranger with dark and foreboding eyes.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Sir David Baird, Baronet

December 6 1757 to August 18 1829

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Sir David was born at Newbyth House in Scotland, into a merchant family. He entered the British Army in 1772 and was sent to India in 1779 with the 73rd Highlanders as a Captain. He was instantly attached to the force commanded by Sir Hector Munro. That force went to assist Colonel William Baillie who was being threatened by Hyder Ali. In that action the whole force was destroyed and Baird was severely wounded and captured. He remained a prisoner for over four years and the bullet that had wounded him not removed until his release.

Baird was promoted to Major in 1787, and purchased his lieutenant-colonelcy in 1790, then returned to India in 1791. He held a brigade command in the war against Tippoo Sultan and served under Lord Cornwallis in the Seringapatam operations in 1792. He captured Pondicherry and was promoted to colonel in 1795. He was appointed to senior brigade command in the war against Tippoo in 1799. Here he led the storming party at Seringapatam and took the stronghold that he had been a prisoner at.

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The command of a large contingent was now given to Colonel Arthur Wellesley (DWW-Nepotism has something to do with that) Baird felt he had been treated with injustice and disrespect. (DWW-Highly likely, Wellesley would not appreciate a man from money and not from the aristocracy, especially one who had an equal or greater career than he had.) Later Baird received the thanks of Parliament and the East India Company, and a pension was offered to him, which he declined hoping to be given the Order of the Bath. Baird commanded the army that was sent to expel the French from Egypt, Wellesley appointed second in command, but ill health kept the Iron Duke (DWW-Wellesley later was known by this) from going. (DWW–Seems there is a rivalry between the two.) Baird was successful in Egypt and returned to India in 1802.

Once again Baird and Wellington were trading plum appointments, and Baird was out of sorts that Wellington received one. In 1804 he was knighted and in 1805-1806 after the victory of Trafalgar commanded he expedition to seize the Cape of Good Hope. After the success here, Commodore Sir Home Popham convinced Baird to lend troops against Buenos Aires, which failed. He was recalled to England in 1807. But then he was employed in the campaign against Copenhagen where he was wounded.

He was not placed as second in command to Sir John Moore. He succeeded to command at Corunna when Moore died but shortly after his arm was shattered. Command passed to another. He was made a Knight Grand Cross of the Bath and a baronet for his services, but this was effectively the end of his military career. He was made governor of Kinsale and appointed commander-in-chief in Ireland in 1820.

He marred in 1810, in his fifties, but did not have any children and so his title passed to his nephew.

Previous Notables (Click to see the Blog):

George III George IV Georgiana Cavendish
William IV Lady Hester Stanhope Lady Caroline Lamb
Princess Charlotte Queen Charlotte Charles James Fox
Queen Adelaide Dorothea Jordan Jane Austen
Maria Fitzherbert Lord Byron John Keats
Princess Caroline Percy Bysshe Shelley Cassandra Austen
Edmund Kean Thomas Clarkson Sir John Moore
John Burgoyne William Wilberforce Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Sarah Siddons Josiah Wedgwood Emma Hamilton
Hannah More John Phillip Kemble John Jervis, Earl St. Vincent
Ann Hatton Stephen Kemble Mary Robinson
Harriet Mellon Zachary Macaulay George Elphinstone
Thomas Babington George Romney Mary Moser
Ozias Humphry William Hayley Daniel Mendoza
Edward Pellew Angelica Kauffman Sir William Hamilton
David Garrick Pownoll Bastard Pellew Charles Arbuthnot
William Upcott William Huskisson Dominic Serres
Sir George Barlow Scrope Davies Charles Francis Greville
George Stubbs Fanny Kemble Thomas Warton
William Mason Thomas Troubridge Charles Stanhope
Robert Fulke Greville Gentleman John Jackson Ann Radcliffe
Edward ‘Golden Ball’ Hughes John Opie Adam Walker
John Ireland Henry Pierrepoint Robert Stephenson
Mary Shelley Sir Joshua Reynolds Francis Place
Richard Harding Evans Lord Thomas Foley Francis Burdett
John Gale Jones George Parker Bidder Sir George Warren
Edward Eliot William Beechey Eva Marie Veigel
Hugh Percy-Northumberland Charles Philip Yorke Lord Palmerston
Samuel Romilly John Petty 2nd Marquess Lansdowne Henry Herbert Southey
Stapleton Cotton Colin Macaulay Amelia Opie
Sir James Hall Henry Thomas Colebrooke Maria Foote


There will be many other notables coming, a full and changing list can be found here on the blog as I keep adding to it. The list so far is:

Home Popham

Colonel William Baillie
Sir Ralph Abercromby
Sir Hector Munro

James Kenney

Elizabeth Inchbald

George Colman the Younger

Thomas Morton

John Liston

Tyrone Power

Colonel William Berkeley

Barry Proctor

William Henry West Betty

Sir George Colebrooke

Joseph John Gurney

John Playfair

James Hutton

Robert Emmet

William Taylor of Norwich

Sir William Knighton

Dr. Robert Gooch

John Romilly

Sir John Herschel

John Horne Tooke

James Mill

Edward Hall Alderson

Henry Perronet Briggs

Robert Owen

Jeremy Bentham

Joseph Hume

Sir Walter Scott

Charles Lamb

John Stuart Mill

Thomas Cochrane

James Paull

Claire Clairmont

William Lovett

Sir John Vaughan

Fanny Imlay

William Godwin

Mary Wollstonecraft

General Sir Robert Arbuthnot

Harriet Fane Arbuthnot

Joseph Antonio Emidy
James Edwards (Bookseller)
William Gifford
John Wolcot (Peter Pindar)
Sir Joseph Banks
Richard Porson
Edward Gibbon
James Smithson
William Cowper
Richard Cumberland
Richard Cosway
Jacob Phillipp Hackert
John Thomas Serres
Wellington (the Military man)
Horatio Nelson
William Vincent
Cuthbert Collingwood
Admiral Sir Graham Moore
Admiral Sir William Sydney Smith
Admiral Sir Joseph Sydney Yorke
Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville
Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville, 1st Lord of the Admiralty
Howe
Viscount Hood
Thomas Hope
Baroness de Calabrella
Thomas Babington Macaulay
Harriet Martineau
Napoleon Bonaparte
Packenham
Admiral Israel Pellew
General Banastre Tarleton
Henry Paget
Francis Leggatt Chantrey
Sir Charles Grey
Thomas Picton
Constable
Thomas Lawrence
James Northcote
Cruikshank
Thomas Gainsborough
James Gillray
George Stubbs
Joseph Priestley
William Aubrey de Vere Beauclerk 9th Duke of St. Albans
Horace Walpole
John Thomas ‘Antiquity’ Smith
Thomas Coutts
Angela Burdett-Coutts
Sir Anthony Carlisle
Rowlandson
William Blake
Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Sir Marc Brunel
Marquis of Stafford Granville Leveson-Gower
Marquis of Stafford George Leveson-Gower
George Stephenson
Nicholas Wood
Edward Pease
Thomas Telford
Joseph Locke
Paul III Anton, Prince Esterházy
Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton
John Nash
Matthew Gregory Lewis
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Robert Southey
Thomas Hope
Henry Holland
Sir Walter Scott
Lord Elgin
Henry Moyes
Jeffery Wyatville
Hester Thrale
William Windham
Madame de Stael
Joseph Black
John Walker
James Boswell
Edward John Eliot
Edward James Eliot
Edward Law, 1st Baron Ellenborough
George Combe
William Harrison Ainsworth
Sir Harry Smith
Thomas Cochrane
Warren Hastings
Edmund Burke
William Petty
Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice
Thomas Douglas, 5th Earl of Selkirk
Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond
Juana Maria de Los Dolores de Leon (Lady Smith)
Duke of Argyll, George William Campbell (1766-1839)
Lord Barrymore, Richard Barry (1769-1794)
Lord Bedford, Francis Russell (1765-1802)
Mr. G. Dawson Damer (1788-1856)
Duke of Devonshire, William Cavendish (1748-1811)
Colonel George Hanger (c.1751-1824)
Lord Hertford, Francis Seymour-Ingram (1743-1822)
Lord Yarmouth, Francis Charles Seymour-Ingram (1777-1842)
Earl of Jersey, George Bussey Villiers (1735-1805)
Sir John , John Lade (1759-1838)
Duke of Norfolk, Charles Howard (1746-1815)
Duke of York , Frederick Augustus Hanover (1763-1827)
Louis Philippe Joseph, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1785 as Duc d’ Orleans (1747-1793)
Louis Philippe, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1793 as Duc d’ Orleans (1773-1850)
Captain John (Jack) Willett Payne (1752-1803)
Duke of Queensberry, William Douglas (1724-1810)
Duke of Rutland, John Henry Manners(1778-1857)
Lord Sefton, William Philip Molyneux (1772-1838)
Admiral Lord Hugh Seymour (1759-1801)
Sir Lumley St. George Skeffington Baronet (1771 – 1850)
Lord Worcester, Henry Somerset (1766-1835)
Lord Worcester, Henry Somerset (1792-1853)
Hon. Frederick Gerald aka “Poodle” Byng

The Dandy Club
        Beau Brummell
        William Arden, 2nd Baron Alvanley
        Henry Mildmay

Patronesses of Almacks
        Emily Lamb, Lady Cowper
        Amelia Stewart, Viscountess Castlereagh
        Sarah Villiers, Countess of Jersey
        Maria Molyneux, Countess of Sefton
        Mrs. Drummond Burrell
        Dorothea Lieven, Countess de Lieven, wife of the Russian Ambassador
        Countess Esterhazy, wife of the Austrian Ambassador

If there are any requests for personalities to be added tot he list, just let us know in the comments section

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As with the past few years, I like to go over what was accomplished last year
Word Count
The word count for the year reached just over 718,000
Writing and where we are at, what I have accomplished:

Book Title
Words written in 2012
# of Pages
Sci Fi Short 2 25,417
85
The Crown Impostor
132,802
443
Magician A Mystery
120,806
403
The Heir
103,771
346
Born To Grace III: Crown in Jeopardy
222,783
743
Food and Art
94,324
314
Micawber and Copperfield
14,946
50

Total                        718,634        2,395

Synopsis of the Books Written
Sci Fi Short 2

This is part of a five book short novel series. It explores a civil war in space. In this book the Unity of Man is broken and shooting starts between both sides. As I developed the ideas for this, it came to me that the reasons for a war like this would parallel the reasons for the American Civil War, without the issue of Slavery. States Rights. The reasoning that a great PR campaign used to make this war. But the for this novel is that economics, those who want to profit by a war set up the conditions for a war. And then the battles of the war would parallel those of the ACW. Here we have the fall of Fort Sumter and First Manassas.

The Crown Impostor

This idea has been floating in my head for a decade, along with a second idea, and they merged. Here I saw that a son would conquer while his father was back running the kingdom. To give it a reason, I saw that a path to the sea for our heroes country was needed, but I also saw that the conquering prince was a bit arrogant. Yet he had an identical twin cousin who was not, and the enemy, well they just had to be very bad. So with all that mix of households back in the days of Henry II, why not do the same here. A loyal vassal of our king and country, with a duchy on the very border, somehow is the male heir of the neighboring kingdom.

His wife is past childbearing and has given him only daughters. Our kingdom lets him go to be a king, they want a new Queen and an heir. So the new Queen’s family does its best to take control and even kills the new king/old duke to make way for a regency with the new Queen in control. As that unfolds our country attacks, but assassins kill the Prince, who summons his cousin before any know he is dying and has the cousin switch places. The cousin now must act like the Crown Prince and see to Justice…

Magician: A Mystery

A contemporary murder mystery. A very successful lead magician at the Palace of Magic is killed, shortly after having breakfast with his very unsuccessful friend. Our hero has advised the victim many times on creating great illusions. And though the victim was able to build a multi-million dollar career, our hero eels out a few thousand dollars by playing bar mitzvahs and sweet sixteens. Yet, our hero is a suspect, even at the exact moment that he discovers that magic is not an illusion, but a reality.

The Heir

An Earl has only a daughter and so his estate and title will go to a cousin. The heroine can not accept this, and though the Heir is pleasant and most seem to like him, she can not. Through a series of mishaps, of course, her opinions will change, as will problems arise for the Heir as he tries to decide should he marry the young lady.

Born To Grace III:Crown in Jeopardy

The final part of the sweeping trilogy where magic is a part of the world. Where kingdoms are gigantic, and where evil is not really the choice between a good path and a bad path so much as evil is what your enemies do. All men follow their hearts and when one’s heart is opposed to your path, it is natural to proclaim them evil. In truth, evil is what comes of the battles that sew death and rend families.

Food and Art

This was the project for NaNoWriMo 2012. Another year I successfully finished a whole book, not just 50,000 words. Here I developed a contemporary romance between a widower whose wife was an artist and he a chef. He built a restaurant that was filled with good food and great art to honor that memory, one he has been hard to move on from, even though he knows he married to early. Into his life, in one night comes the sister of his sister’s sister-in-law. He has never met the girl. She also had a relationship based on sex, rather than respect and is an artist. One that can compliment the restaurant. That they realize both needed more mature relationships, and begin to find it in each other is the basis.

Micawber and Copperfield

This is an entry for a SteamPunk short story competition. What would happen if literary characters were caught up in the Steampunk milieu? Here I have the grandsons of Dickens Iconic characters on an adventure as part of the Royal Dirigible Corps in 1879 South Africa.

Books sold in 2012 totals
331 Sales in 2012, down from 501 in 2011
The End of the World                                                9       
The Shattered Mirror                                                21
Colonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence               264    
A Trolling We Will Go                                             4                                         
Genghis Khan’s Rules for (Warriors) Writers        7
Jane Austen and Ghosts                                6
Two Peas In A Pod                                        16
ECO Agents:Save the Planet                        5

Blog Stats
I have not reported on my Blog before since it was not really much of anything, until this last year.
In 2008 we had 1 visitor. It grew since then. Of Course the change from 2008 to 2009 was the greatest, but that was probably an aberration for 2008. It doubled in 2010, and doubled in 2011, but last year it took off.

Year
# Of Visitors
2008
1
2009
306
2010
621
2011
1301
2012 9031

The month activity shows:

Month Visitors
January
166
February
288
March
235
April
267
May
289
June
639
July
1032
August
808
September
874
October
1203
November
1555
December
1675

Graphs
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Books that were read (reviews can be found at David’s Reading List) :
This year with working for over three months, the upheaval in my life, 53 books read and reviewed.

# Title Cover
1 The Master of Heathcrest Hall by Galen Beckett PastedGraphic-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
2 Gunpowder God by John F. Carr
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3 Theft of Sword by Michael J. Sullivan PastedGraphic1-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
4 Rise of Empire by Michael J. Sullivan PastedGraphic3-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
5 Heir of Novron by Michael J. Sullivan PastedGraphic2-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
6 A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs PastedGraphic4-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
7 Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne PastedGraphic5-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
8 The Weapon by David Poyer PastedGraphic6-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
9 The Crisis by David Poyer PastedGraphic7-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
10 The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss PastedGraphic8-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
11 The Crown of the Blood by Gav Thorpe PastedGraphic10-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
12 Fire in the East by Harry Sidebottom PastedGraphic9-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
13 The New iPad Portable Genius by Paul McFedries PastedGraphic11-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
14 Madness of March by Burt Golden PastedGraphic13-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
15 The Profession by Steven Pressfield PastedGraphic12-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
16 Attila by William Napier PastedGraphic15-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
17 Assault on Juno by Mark Zuehlke PastedGraphic14-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
18 Raingun by John Blackport PastedGraphic17-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
19 Capitol Offense by Barbara Mikulski PastedGraphic16-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
20 The Affinity Bridge by George Mann PastedGraphic19-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
21 Zulu Hart by Saul David PastedGraphic18-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
22 The Guns of El Kebir by John Wilcox PastedGraphic21-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
23 My New iPad by Wallace Wang PastedGraphic20-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
24 Empire in Black and Gold by Adrian Tchaikovsky PastedGraphic22-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
25 The New iPad Fully Loaded by Alan Hess PastedGraphic23-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
26 Long Summer Day by R.F. Delderfield PastedGraphic25-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
27 The Kickstarter Handbook by Dan Steinberg PastedGraphic24-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
28 Among Thieves by Douglas Hulick PastedGraphic27-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
29 Siege of Khartoum by John Wilcox PastedGraphic26-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
30 Adobe Photoshop CS3 Classroom in a Book PastedGraphic30-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
31 Victory by Julian Stockwin PastedGraphic29-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
32 Post of Honour by R.F. Delderfield PastedGraphic28-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
33 The Green Gauntlet by R.F. Delderfield PastedGraphic31-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
34 The Shangani Patrol by John Wilcox PastedGraphic33-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
35 A Shadow in Summer by Daniel Abraham PastedGraphic32-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
36 The Jane Austen Book Club by Karen Joy Fowler PastedGraphic34-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
37 The Companion of Lady Holmeshire by Debra Brown PastedGraphic35-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
38 A Betrayal in Winter by Daniel Abraham PastedGraphic38-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
39 Elephants in the Distance by Daniel Stashower PastedGraphic37-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
40 Long Live the King by Mary Roberts Rinehart PastedGraphic36-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
41 Merits and Mercenaries by Lady A PastedGraphic40-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
42 The Tower Treasure by Franklin W. Dixon PastedGraphic39-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
43 The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith PastedGraphic41-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
44 Quarter Share by Nathan Lowell PastedGraphic43-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
45 Police Your Planet by Lester del Rey PastedGraphic42-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
46 Half Share by Nathan Lowell PastedGraphic44-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
47 Encyclopedia Brown, Boy Detective by Donald J. Sobol PastedGraphic45-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
48 Full Share by Nathan Lowell PastedGraphic46-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
49 Traitor Blade by Richard Crawford PastedGraphic47-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
50 Walls of Jericho by Jonathan Hopkins PastedGraphic48-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
51 The Big Year by Mark Obmascik PastedGraphic49-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
52 We Bought a Zoo by Benjamin Mee PastedGraphic50-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg
53 Ship’s Boy by Phil Geusz PastedGraphic51-2013-01-28-07-39.jpg

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Trolling Down to Old Mah Wee
Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but I also have delved into Fantasy. The Trolling series, (the first three are in print) is the story of a man, Humphrey. We meet him as he has left youth and become a man with a man’s responsibilities. We follow him in a series of stories that encompass the stages of life. We see him when he starts his family, when he has older sons and the father son dynamic is tested. We see him when his children begin to marry and have children, and at the end of his life when those he has loved, and those who were his friends proceed him over the threshold into death.
All this while he serves a kingdom troubled by monsters. Troubles that he and his friends will learn to deal with and rectify.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For $3.99 you can get this 2nd book in the fantasy adventure series of Humphrey and Gwendolyn.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

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Amazon for your Kindle
When the neighboring kingdom of Mah Wee begins to experience the same problems that beset Torahn some years before, they urgently request the aid of the experts in containing a new Troll infestation. But eradicating Trolls is not as easy as exterminating a few rats or mice. Trolls are bigger than men, they are stronger than men, and then are meaner than men. Humphrey Cutter and his band of mismatched warriors must once again rise to the occasion, but can they without the aid of expertise of Gwendolyn and her particular skills?

   Mah Wee, an ancient kingdom, with a monarch more steeped in the rights of being a king rather than the obligations and duties that a king should be. Here Humphrey and his crew finds that they have more than Trolls to overcome if they are to save Mah Wee from the same or nearly similar problems that they faced before in Torahn. But, as Humphrey knows, nothing can truly be accomplished if the lovely Gwendolyn is not able to lend her aid as well.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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