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Archive for November, 2013

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Dr William Pulteney Alison
12 November 1790 – 22 September 1859

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Dr William Pulteney Alison

A Scottish physician, social reformer and philanthropist. He was a distinguished professor of medicine at Edinburgh University. He served as president of the Medico-Chirurgical Society of Edinburgh (1833), president of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh (1836–8), and vice-president of the British Medical Association, convening its meeting in Edinburgh in 1858.

Alison was the eldest son of the Rev Archibald Alison and Dorothea Gregory; the elder brother of the advocate Archibald Alison; and godson of Laura Pulteney, 1st Countess of Bath. In his youth he climbed Mont Blanc and other mountains as a pastime and in 1811 he graduated as a physician from Edinburgh University. He studied under his father’s friend Dugald Stewart, and for a time he was expected to follow a career in philosophy rather than medicine.

His uncle was Professor James Gregory and his cousin was Professor William Gregory.

Struck by the poverty he encountered Alison advocated poor relief in Scotland be extended from the sick and infirm to include the healthy impoverished. This was a radical suggestion as the ethos of the age was for poor relief to be withheld from the able-bodied destitute who were presumed to be indolent and sinful.

Alison proposed using the Scottish Poor Law to alleviate poverty as a means of assuaging disease, but the Poor Law Commissioners supported the position of English reformer Edwin Chadwick that disease was caused by filth and miasmas. Alison held to the contagion theory of disease, stating its spread was facilitated through poverty and overcrowding. He argued that poverty arose from social factors, not sin and sloth, and that higher wages should be paid to workers to mitigate disease by reducing the effect of overcrowding and destitution. In stating a case for fighting disease that appeared to be outside the province of contemporary medicine Alison was a pioneer of “political” medicine, as well as social epidemiology and public health.

In his 1840 publication Observations on the management of the poor in Scotland and its effect on the health in the great towns, Alison argued that the government and its agencies had a major role in the alleviation of poverty and that this undertaking should not be left to religious groups or private charities. He advocated using public taxes to assist widows, orphans and the unemployed poor, and criticised the establishment for ignoring those who were fit but impoverished. The findings of the 1844 Royal Commission on Poor Laws (Scotland) lent support to Alison’s viewpoint.

Alison promoted preventive social medicine and initiated a program to vaccinate children against smallpox, and he established Edinburgh’s Fever Board to combat epidemics. He advocated speedy diagnosis of the ill and, where found to be contagious or infectious, he recommended fumigation and ventilation of the residence and prompt hospitalisation for the patient. His methods bore fruit during the cholera epidemic of 1831–1832, whereby Edinburgh took immediate and effective action to mitigate the outbreak without awaiting instructions from London.

In strongly advocating government intervention to alleviate poverty as a means to combat disease Alison was ahead of his time but he lived to see public opinion move closer to his initiatives.

He married his first cousin Margaret Craufurd/Crawford Gregory (1809–1849), daughter of James Gregory in 1832; the marriage was childless.

Attacks of epilepsy forced him to retire in 1856, and he died at Colinton on 22 September, 1859. He was interred at St John’s Episcopal Cemetery in Edinburgh.

He wrote – Outlines of physiology (1831)

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables. The list of Previous Notables and Upcoming Entries has grown so long that I will post this once a week on Saturdays now.

Previous Notables (Click to see the Blog):

George III George IV Georgiana Cavendish
William IV Lady Hester Stanhope Lady Caroline Lamb
Princess Charlotte Queen Charlotte Charles James Fox
Queen Adelaide Dorothea Jordan Jane Austen
Maria Fitzherbert Lord Byron John Keats
Princess Caroline Percy Bysshe Shelley Cassandra Austen
Edmund Kean Thomas Clarkson Sir John Moore
John Burgoyne William Wilberforce Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Sarah Siddons Josiah Wedgwood Emma Hamilton
Hannah More John Phillip Kemble John Jervis, Earl St. Vincent
Ann Hatton Stephen Kemble Mary Robinson
Harriet Mellon Zachary Macaulay George Elphinstone
Thomas Babington George Romney Mary Moser
Ozias Humphry William Hayley Daniel Mendoza
Edward Pellew Angelica Kauffman Sir William Hamilton
David Garrick Pownoll Bastard Pellew Charles Arbuthnot
William Upcott William Huskisson Dominic Serres
Sir George Barlow Scrope Davies Charles Francis Greville
George Stubbs Fanny Kemble Thomas Warton
William Mason Thomas Troubridge Charles Stanhope
Robert Fulke Greville Gentleman John Jackson Ann Radcliffe
Edward ‘Golden Ball’ Hughes John Opie Adam Walker
John Ireland Henry Pierrepoint Robert Stephenson
Mary Shelley Sir Joshua Reynolds Francis Place
Richard Harding Evans Lord Thomas Foley Francis Burdett
John Gale Jones George Parker Bidder Sir George Warren
Edward Eliot William Beechey Eva Marie Veigel
Hugh Percy-Northumberland Charles Philip Yorke Lord Palmerston
Samuel Romilly John Petty 2nd Marquess Lansdowne Henry Herbert Southey
Stapleton Cotton Colin Macaulay Amelia Opie
Sir James Hall Henry Thomas Colebrooke Maria Foote
Sir David Baird Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville Dr. Robert Gooch
William Baillie James Northcote Horatio Nelson
Henry Fuseli Home Riggs Popham John Playfair
Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice 3rd Marquess Lansdowne Thomas Douglas 5th Earl of Selkirk Frederick Gerald “Poodle” Byng
Henry Somerset, 7th Duke of Beaufort John Wolcot (Peter Pindar) Joseph John Gurney
Edward John Eliot Henry Perronet Briggs George Lionel Dawson-Damer
Thomas Foley Mark Robinson Charles Culling Smith
Francis Charles Seymour-Ingram, 3rd Marquess of Hertford Thomas Fowell Buxton Tyrone Power
Richard Cumberland William Philip Molyneux, 2nd Earl of Sefton Edward Law, 1st Baron Ellenborough
Jeffry Wyattville Henry Mildmay Nicholas Wood
Hester Thrale Catherine Hughes, Baroness de Calabrella Admiral Israel Pellew
William Wellesley Pole, 3rd Earl of Mornington Henry Moyes Charles Fitzroy
Lord Granville Somerset Lumley St. George Skeffington William Playfair
John Lade Astley Cooper Matthew Gregory Lewis
Edward Pease Thomas Coutts John Urpeth Rastrick
Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond Captain William Baillie John Pitt Kennedy
Henry Cline Sarah Clementina Drummond-Burrell Samuel Wyatt
Lord George Lennox George Bussy Villiers Henry FitzRoy 5th Duke of Grafton
John Bell (Surgeon) Robert Smirke (Painter) John Kennedy (Manufacturer)
John Gell Dugald Stewart Louisa Gurney Hoare
William Nicol (Surgeon) William Nicol (Geologist) Edward Hall Alderson
Thomas Hope Richard Cosway Jonathan Backhouse
Lady Sarah Lennox John Byng, 5th Viscount Torrington Harriette Wilson
Andrew Plimer George Henry Borrow Charles Lamb
Henry Somerset, 5th Duke of Beaufort Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst Skeffington Lutwidge
George Colman the Elder William Hotham Jacob Bell
Charles Heathcote Tatham William Allen (Quaker) John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute
John Henry Manners, 5th Duke of Rutland William Gell Richard Barry, 7th Earl Barrymore
Samuel Bagster the Younger Lady Anne (Wesley) Fitzroy Samuel Gurney
John Liston Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond Luke Howard
Alexander MacKenzie (Explorer) John Pasco Joseph Black
Sir Robert Calder Benjamin Travers John Walker (Cricketer)
John (Johnnie) Walker Joseph Fox the Younger Bishop Beilby Porteus
Sir William Knighton George Rose Edward St. Maur 11th Duke of Somerset
Samuel Bagster the Elder Richard Keppel Craven Edwin Henry Landseer
James Paull (Duelist) Henry Thornton Peter Pond
George Rose (Barrister) William Vincent Humphry Repton
Eliab Harvey Sir George Henry Rose James Kenney
James Kennedy Nevil Maskelyne James Playfair
John Auldjo Thomas Morton (Shipbuilder) Charles Kemble
Sir John Vaughan (Judge) Henry Paget Henry Holland (Cricketer)
Sir Henry Holland (Baronet) Mary Alcock Tom Walker (Cricketer)
Thomas Bradley (Physician) Henry Dundas Trotter Thomas Picton
Sir Charles Middleton William Henry Playfair John Palmer (The 2 Architects)
William Ludlam Thomas Ludlam John Pinch the Elder
George Harris, 1st Baron Edward Waring William Aubrey de Vere Beauclerk 9th Duke of St Albans
Isaac Milner Sir Henry Blackwood William Lovett
General Sir Edward Paget Colonel John Vaughan William Locker
William George Keith Elphinstone Sir William Parker Baronet of Harburn Charles Hutton
John Thomas ‘Antiquity’ Smith Thomas Grey Egerton

1st Earl of Wilton

William Allen (Royal Navy Officer)
Thomas Baldwin Nathaniel Plimer Sir Edward Berry
Charles Gordon Lennox 5th Duke of Richmond George Combe Henry Siddons
Angela Burdett-Coutts William Ellis (Painter) William Drummond of Logiealmond
William George Harris Gerrard Andrewes Berkeley Paget
John Palmer (postal Innovator) Thomas Ludlam Henry Hetherington
Sir Charles Bagot Edward Ellice Francis Douce
Sir Hector Munro Richard Harris Barham Andrew Meikle
William Anderson (Artist) William Hunter Cavendish 5th Duke of Devonshire William Stewart Rose
Harriet Murray John Hunter (Politician) John Thomas Serres
Joseph Antonio Emidy Joseph Hume Thomas Holcroft
Archibald Alison Abraham Rees Thomas Helmore
Colonel William Berkeley Thomas Hearne Richard Carlile
Julius Caesar Ibbetson George Howard, 6th Earl of Carlisle John Rennie
William Oxberry William Hornby William Holme Twentyman
Charles Howard 11th Duke of Norfolk Gerard Lake Sir Archibald Alison, 1st Baronet
Isaac Taylor Edward Howard-Gibbon Marquis of Stafford Granville Leveson-Gower
Robert Aspland George Harris 3rd Baron Harris Thomas Telford
George Phillip Manners Arthur Hill, 3rd Marquess of Downshire Daniel Gurney
Sir Peter Parker John Horsley Palmer Richard Watson (politician)
Joseph Farington Charles Fitzroy, Baron Southampton William Henry West Betty
Charles Stuart (British Army Officer) Marguerite Gardiner, Countess of Blessington Paul III Anton, Prince Esterházy
William Danby George Macartney Richard Payne Knight
Admiral Adam Duncan James George Smith Neill Sir Anthony Carlisle
John Hely-Hutchinson, 2nd Earl of Donoughmore Admiral Lord Hugh Seymour Richard Robert Madden
Joseph Milner Sidney Smith (wit) George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer
Henry Duncan John Nichols Thom Charles Gardiner, 1st Earl of Blessington
Uvedale Price James Foster Richard Colt Hoare
Richard Watson (Bishop) Francis Ingram-Seymour-Conway 2nd Marquess of Hertford Charles FitzRoy 3rd Baron Southampton
Duke of York Frederick Augustus Hanover Price Blackwood Benjamin Outram
Major General John Dalling John Thelwall Robert “Bobus” Percy Smith
John Carr (architect) James Archibald Stuart Roger Curtis
Sir Erasmus Gower Charles Pepys Earl of Cottenham Joseph Chitty
Henry Thoby Prinsep James Coutts Crawford Sir Charles Edward Grey
John Palmer (Commissary) Samuel Barrington William Gifford
John Richardson Henry Holland Thomas Harley
Emily Lennox Alexander Hood Charles Grey, 1st Earl Grey
John Wilson Croker Beaumont Hotham John Fane 11th Earl of Westmorland
George Johnston Henry Temple 2nd Viscount Palmerston Simon McGillivray
Colonel George Hanger Sir John McMahon William Babington
John Hoppner Sir Richard Onslow John Byng 1st Earl of Strafford
William Wilkins Daines Barrington John Bell (publisher)
Alexander Ball Lord Robert Seymour Jacob Philipp Hackert
John Cleave Hussey Vivian 1st Baron Vivian George Cowper 6th Earl Cowper
Edward Bouverie Pusey

There will be many other notables coming, a full and changing list can be found here on the blog as I keep adding to it. The list so far is:

  • Victoria
  • Granville Sharp
  • Elizabeth (Gurney) Fry
  • Adam Ferguson of Raith
  • John Pinch the Younger
  • William Paley
  • Richard Watson
  • Joseph Louis Lagrange
  • James Hutton
  • John Boydell
  • Viscount Robert Castlereagh
  • George Canning
  • James Stirling
  • John MacBride
  • William Waldegrave
  • William Beatty
  • John Thomas Duckworth
  • Robert Linzee
  • David Dundas
  • Sir Hyde Parker
  • Sir Thomas Hardy
  • Thomas Hardy (Reformer)
  • Sir William Parker
  • William Cornwallis
  • Charles Cornwallis
  • William Baillie (artist)
  • Sir Ralph Abercromby
  • Elizabeth Inchbald
  • George Colman the Younger
  • Thomas Morton
  • Henry Proctor (British Army Officer)
  • Sir George Colebrooke
  • Robert Emmet
  • Thomas Fortescue Kennedy
  • William Taylor of Norwich
  • John Romilly
  • Sir John Herschel
  • John Horne Tooke
  • James Mill
  • Robert Owen
  • Jeremy Bentham
  • John Stuart Mill
  • Thomas Cochrane
  • Edward Jenner
  • Claire Clairmont
  • Fanny Imlay
  • William Godwin
  • William Hazlitt
  • Mary Wollstonecraft
  • James Edward Smith
  • General Sir Robert Arbuthnot
  • Harriet Fane Arbuthnot
  • John Fane, 10th Earl of Westmorland
  • James Edwards (Bookseller)
  • Sir Joseph Banks
  • Richard Porson
  • Edward Gibbon
  • James Smithson
  • William Cowper
  • Wellington (the Military man)
  • Cuthbert Collingwood
  • Admiral Sir Graham Moore
  • Sydney Smith
  • Admiral Sir William Sydney Smith
  • Admiral Sir Joseph Sydney Yorke
  • Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville
  • William Howe
  • Richard Howe
  • Viscount Sir Samuel Hood
  • Sir Samuel Hood
  • Thomas Hope
  • Thomas Babington Macaulay
  • Harriet Martineau
  • Napoleon Bonaparte
  • Sir Edward Michael Pakenham
  • General Banastre Tarleton
  • Francis Leggatt Chantrey
  • Sir Charles Grey
  • John Constable
  • Thomas Lawrence
  • Sir William Lawrence, 1st Baronet
  • George Cruikshank
  • Thomas Gainsborough
  • James Gillray
  • Joseph Priestley
  • William Whewell
  • Horace Walpole
  • Maria Walpole
  • Thomas Rowlandson
  • William Blake
  • Isambard Kingdom Brunel
  • Sir Marc Brunel
  • Marquis of Stafford George Leveson-Gower
  • George Stephenson
  • Joseph Locke
  • Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton
  • John Nash
  • John Soane
  • Robert Smirke (architect)
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Robert Southey
  • Sir Walter Scott
  • John Scott, Earl of Eldon
  • Lord Elgin
  • William Windham
  • William Cobbett
  • Madame de Stael
  • John Walker (inventor)(Natural Historian)(Lexicographer)
  • James Boswell
  • Edward James Eliot
  • William Harrison Ainsworth
  • Sir Harry Smith
  • Thomas Cochrane
  • Warren Hastings
  • Edmund Burke
  • William Petty
  • Juana Maria de Los Dolores de Leon (Lady Smith)
  • Lord Bedford, Francis Russell (1765-1802)
  • Louis Philippe Joseph, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1785 as Duc d’ Orleans (1747-1793)
  • Louis Philippe, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1793 as Duc d’ Orleans (1773-1850)
  • Captain John (Jack) Willett Payne (1752-1803)
  • John Bell
  • Richard Colley Wellesley
  • Henry Wellesley
  • James Wyatt
  • John Blaquiere, 1st Baron de Blaquiere
  • William Pole-Tylney-Long-Wellesley
  • Lord FitzRoy Somerset, 1st Baron Raglan
  • Robert Smith, 1st Baron Carrington
  • James Watt
  • John Hunter (Royal Navy)
  • Joseph Pease
  • Richard Trevithick
  • Louisa Lennox
  • Thomas Baillie (Royal Navy officer)
  • Charles James Napier
  • Sir William Hotham
  • Matthew Boulton
  • Sir Charles Bell
  • James Gregory
  • Edward Maltby
  • Richard Barnewell
  • Charles James Blomfield
  • William Carr Beresford 1st Viscount Beresford
  • Maria Hadfield
  • George Byng 6th Viscount Torrington
  • John Russell, 1st Earl Russell
  • James Spencer-Bell
  • George Brydges Rodney
  • Samuel Pepys Cockerell
  • John Linnell
  • Charles Catton the Younger
  • Frederick Howard, 5th Earl of Carlisle
  • Benjamin Robert Haydon
  • John Dalton
  • Sir Philip Durham
  • William Hasledine Pepys
  • Joseph Lancaster
  • Samuel Whitbread
  • Francis Augustus Collier
  • Humphry Davy
  • George Shillibeer
  • Samuel Hoare Jr.
  • Thomas Moore
  • Edward Dodwell
  • Archibald Norman McLeod
  • George Vancouver
  • Sir George Simpson
  • William Morgan (actuary)
  • Harry Walker
  • Alexander Walker
  • George Templer
  • Thomas Landseer
  • Sir Robert Inglis
  • Frederick Richard Lee
  • William McGillivray
  • Lucia Elizabeth Vestris
  • John Vaughan 3rd Earl of Lisburne
  • Samuel Rogers
  • Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • Edward Troughton
  • Edward Ellice
  • John MacDonald of Garth
  • Sir Archibald Campbell
  • Maria Theresa Kemble
  • Thomas Muir of Huntershill
  • Thomas Fyshe Palmer
  • Maurice Margarot
  • Captain William Paget
  • Sir Arthur Paget
  • Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Paget
  • Charles Burney
  • Lord Frederick Beauclerk
  • William Fullarton
  • Francis Jeffrey
  • Charles Simeon
  • Thomas de Quincey
  • James Watson
  • Daniel O’Connell
  • Feargus O’Connor
  • Joseph Nollekens
  • Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster
  • Richard Grosvenor, 1st Earl Grosvenor
  • Andrew Geddes
  • Andrew Combe
  • Sir William Hamilton, 9th Baronet
  • William Ellis
  • William A. F. Browne
  • Robert William Elliston
  • William Henry Murray
  • Daniel Terry
  • Joanna Baillie
  • Theodore Hook
  • Robert Scott Lauder
  • Chauncey Hare Townshend
  • Paul Sandby
  • William Heberden the Younger
  • Henry Paget 1st Earl of Uxbridge
  • Richard Hurd
  • George Mudie
  • Abel Heywood
  • George Holyoake
  • Charles Poulett Thomson
  • William Charles Keppel, 4th Earl of Albemarle
  • Thomas Coke, 1st Earl of Leicester
  • George Rennie
  • Elizabeth Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire
  • Frederick Hervey
  • Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Earl Granville
  • Sir Augustus William James Clifford
  • Charles Murray
  • George Lamb (politician and Writer)
  • Dr William Pulteney Alison
  • Francis Baring
  • Thomas Rees
  • John Jones
  • Sir James Edward Smith
  • John Evans
  • Thomas Jervis
  • Olivia Serres
  • Derwent Coleridge
  • Maurice Berkeley, 1st Baron FitzHardinge
  • Henry FitzHardinge Berkeley
  • Grantley Berkeley
  • Craven Berkeley
  • George Cranfield-Berkeley
  • Sir George Beaumont, 7th Baronet
  • Ralph Payne, 1st Baron Lavington
  • Joseph Mallord William Turner
  • Thomas Girtin
  • Thomas Monro
  • George Dance the Younger
  • William Daniell
  • Henry Monro
  • Henry Hunt
  • William Hone
  • James Wilson
  • Robert Taylor (Radical)
  • Benjamin West
  • William Roscoe
  • Thomas Harrison (architect)
  • John Rennie the Younger
  • Sir Samuel Bentham
  • Thomas John Dibdin
  • George Soane
  • John Emery
  • Elizabeth Rebecca Edwin
  • Lawrence Holme Twentyman
  • Mary Ann Gibbon
  • Matthew Howard-Gibbon
  • Sir William Woods
  • Patrick Tytler
  • Robert Scott Lauder
  • Isaac Taylor of Ongar
  • Josiah Conder
  • Jacob Rey
  • Robert Hall
  • John Foster
  • Olinthus Gilbert Gregory
  • Jane Taylor
  • John Wilson (Scottish writer)
  • Sir James Stephens
  • Ann Taylor (poet)
  • John Eyre
  • Thomas Noon Talfourd
  • Southwood Smith
  • William Johnson Fox
  • Elizabeth Fox, Baroness Holland
  • Walter Wilson
  • Sir William Pulteney, 5th Baronet
  • William Jessop
  • Thomas Campbell
  • Phillip Hardwick
  • Charles Harcourt Masters
  • William Hay, 17th Earl of Erroll
  • Sir Peter Parker, 2nd Baronet
  • Thomas Taylour, 1st Marquess of Headfort
  • George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer
  • John Home
  • Frederick Edward Jones
  • John Stuart, 1st Marquess of Bute
  • William Stuart
  • Lady Louisa Stuart
  • James Lowther
  • Charles Stuart, 1st Baron Stuart de Rothesay
  • Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 1st Earl of Minto
  • Andrew Blayney, 11th Baron Blayney
  • Walter Savage Landor
  • Sir George Staunton
  • William Gilpin
  • Henry Trollope
  • Henry Havelock
  • Nicholas Carlisle
  • William Nicholson
  • Sir George Seymour
  • Miles Atkinson
  • William Dealtry
  • Samuel Marsden
  • George Pryme
  • Thomas Perronet Thompson
  • Alexander Horn
  • John Rylands
  • Sir Richard Bickerton
  • Robert Corbet
  • Richard Cope (minister)
  • Ricahrd Watson (politician)
  • William Wordsworth
  • Elizabeth Barrett Browning
  • William Lyttelton
  • William Cunnington
  • Francis Nicholson
  • Geroge Hay, 8th Marquess of Tweeddale
  • James Anderson of Hermiston
  • John Hookham Frere
  • Henry Vassall-Fox
  • George Richardson (Architect)
  • William Chambers (Architect)
  • James Stuart-Wortley-Mackenzie, 1st Baron Wharncliffe
  • James Stuart-Mackenzie
  • William Legge
  • George Cartwright
  • Molyneux Shuldham
  • Anthony James Pye Molloy
  • James Gambier
  • Lucuis Curtis
  • William Wingfield
  • Thomas Starkie
  • John Prinsep
  • James Prinsep
  • Francis Rawdon-Hastings, 1st Marquess of Hastings
  • Sir Charles Knowles
  • William Bligh
  • Sophia Campbell (Palmer)
  • Robert Campbell
  • Francis Grose
  • John Macarthur
  • Sir Thomas Brisbane
  • George Ellis
  • John Gibson Lockhart
  • William Stevens
  • William Adam
  • John Thomas Troy
  • Sir Robert Dallas
  • Thomas Hardwick
  • Major-General Robert Craufurd
  • Charles Berry
  • Priscilla Fane, Countess of Westmorland
  • Arthur Phillip
  • Esther Abrahams
  • William Paterson (explorer)
  • Joseph Foveaux
  • Henry Fulton
  • Simon McTavish
  • Colin Robertson
  • Sir John Easthope
  • William McMahon
  • William Behnes
  • Edward O’Byren
  • Rowland Hill 1st Viscount Hill
  • William Railton
  • John Peter Gandy
  • William Crotch
  • Samuel Wesley
  • Henry Pigot
  • Henry Vincent
  • William Cathcart, 1st Earl Cathcart
  • Thomas de Grey, 2nd Earl de Grey
  • John Henry Newman
  • John Keble
  • Hugh James Rose

The Dukes

  • Duke of Norfolk, Bernard Edward Howard (1765-1842)
  • Duke of Norfolk, Henry Charles Howard (1791-1856)
  • Duke of Somerset, Edward Adolphus Seymour (1804-1885)
  • Duke of Argyll, George William Campbell (1766-1839)
  • Duke of Queensberry, William Douglas (1724-1810)
  • Duke of Grafton, Augustus Henry FitzRoy, 3rd Duke 1735-1811
  • Duke of Grafton, George FitzRoy, 4th Duke 1760-1844
  • Duke of Gordon, Alexander 4th Duke 1743-1827
  • Duke of Northumberland, Hugh Percy 1742-1817
  • Duke of Northumberland, Geroge Percy 1778-1867

The Royals

  • Ernest Augustus 1 of Hanover

The Dandy Club

  •         Beau Brummell
  •         William Arden, 2nd Baron Alvanley

Patronesses of Almacks

  •         Emily Lamb, Lady Cowper
  •         Amelia Stewart, Viscountess Castlereagh
  •         Sarah Villiers, Countess of Jersey
  •         Maria Molyneux, Countess of Sefton
  •         Dorothea Lieven, Countess de Lieven, wife of the Russian Ambassador
  •         Countess Esterhazy, wife of the Austrian Ambassador

If there are any requests for personalities to be added to the list, just let us know in the comments section

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Edward Bouverie Pusey
22 August 1800 – 16 September 1882

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Edward Bouverie Pusey

He was born in the village of Pusey in Berkshire. His father was Philip Bouverie (d. 1828), a younger son of the 1st Viscount Folkestone, and took the name of Pusey on succeeding to the manorial estates at that place. After attending Eton College, Edward became a commoner of Christ Church, and was elected in 1824 to a fellowship at Oriel College. He thus became a member of a society which already contained some of the ablest of his contemporaries—among them John Henry Newman and John Keble.

Between 1825 and 1827, he studied Oriental languages and German theology at the University of Göttingen. His first work, published in 1828, as an answer to Hugh James Rose’s Cambridge lectures on rationalist tendencies in German theology, showed a good deal of sympathy with the German “pietists”, who had striven to deliver Protestantism from its decadence; this sympathy was misunderstood, and Pusey was himself accused of holding rationalist views.

In the same year (1828) the Prime Minister (the Duke of Wellington) appointed him to the Regius professorship of Hebrew with the attached canonry of Christ Church. The misunderstanding of his position led to the publication in 1830 of a second part of Pusey’s Historical Enquiry, in which he denied the charge of rationalism. In the years which immediately followed, his thoughts turned in another direction. The revolt against individualism had begun, and he was attracted to its standard. By the end of 1833 he showed a disposition to make common cause with those who had already begun to issue the Tracts for the Times. “He was not, however, fully associated in the movement till 1835 and 1836, when he published his tract on baptism and started the Library of the Fathers“.

He became a close student of the Church Fathers and the Caroline Divines who revived traditions of pre-Reformation teaching. A sermon which he preached before the university in May 1843, The Holy Eucharist, a Comfort to the Penitent, so startled the authorities by the re-statement of doctrines which, though well known to ecclesiastical antiquaries, had faded from the common view, that by the exercise of an authority which, however legitimate, was almost obsolete, he was suspended for two years from preaching. The immediate effect of his suspension was the sale of 18,000 copies of the condemned sermon; its permanent effect was to make Pusey for the next quarter of a century the most influential person in the Anglican Church, for it was one of the causes which led Newman to sever himself from that communion.

The movement, in the actual origination of which he had had no share, came to bear his name: it was popularly known as Puseyism and its adherents as Puseyites. His activity, both public and private, as leader of the movement was enormous. He was not only on the stage but also behind the scenes of every important controversy, whether theological or academic. In the Gorham controversy of 1850, in the question of Oxford reform in 1854, in the prosecution of some of the writers of Essays and Reviews, especially of Benjamin Jowett, in 1863, in the question as to the reform of the marriage laws from 1849 to the end of his life, in the Farrar controversy as to the meaning of everlasting punishment in 1877, he was always busy with articles, letters, treatises and sermons.

The occasions on which, in his turn, he preached before his university were all memorable; and some of the sermons were manifestoes which mark distinct stages in the history of the High Church party of which he was the leader. The practice of confession in the Church of England practically dates from his two sermons on The Entire Absolution of the Penitent, in 1846, in which the revival of high sacramental doctrine is complemented by the advocacy of a revival of the penitential system which medieval theologians had appended to it. The sermon on The Presence of Christ in the Holy Eucharist, in 1853, first formulated the doctrine round which almost all the subsequent theology of his followers revolved, and which revolutionized the practices of Anglican worship. Of his larger works the most important are his two books on the Eucharist—The Doctrine of the Real Presence (1855) and The Real Presence the Doctrine of the English Church (1857); Daniel the Prophet in which he endeavours to maintain the traditional date of that book; The Minor Prophets, with Commentary, his chief contribution to the study of which he was the professor; and the Eirenicon, in which he endeavoured to find a basis of union between the Church of England and the Church of Rome.

In private life Pusey’s habits were simple almost to austerity. He had few personal friends, and rarely mingled in general society; though bitter to opponents, he was gentle to those who knew him, and his munificent charities gave him a warm place in the hearts of many to whom he was personally unknown. In his domestic life he had some severe trials; his wife died, after eleven years of married life, in 1839; his only son, who was a scholar like-minded with himself, who had shared many of his literary labours, and who had edited an excellent edition of St Cyril’s commentary on the minor prophets, died in 1880, after many years of suffering. From that time Pusey was seen by only a few persons. His strength gradually declined, and he died on 16 September 1882, after a short illness. He was buried at Oxford in the cathedral of which he had been for fifty-four years a canon. In his memory his friends purchased his library, and bought for it a house in Oxford, known as the Pusey House, which they endowed with sufficient funds to maintain three librarians, who were charged with the duty of endeavouring to perpetuate in the university the memory of the principles which he taught.

Pusey is chiefly remembered as the eponymous representative of the earlier phase of a movement which carried with it no small part of the religious life of England in the latter half of the 19th century. His own chief characteristic was an almost unbounded capacity for painstaking work. His chief influence was that of a preacher and a spiritual adviser. As a preacher he lacked all the graces of oratory, but compelled attention by his searching and practical earnestness. His correspondence as a spiritual adviser was enormous; his deserved reputation for piety and for solidity of character made him the chosen confessor to whom large numbers of men and women unburdened their doubts and their sins.

He was more a theological antiquary than a theologian. Pusey was in fact left behind by his followers, even in his lifetime. His revival of the doctrine of the Real Presence, coinciding as it did with the revival of a taste for medieval art, naturally led to a revival of the pre-Reformation ceremonial of worship. With this, Pusey had little sympathy. He protested against it (in a university sermon in 1859) and, though he came to defend those who were accused of breaking the law in their practice of it, said that their practice was alien to his own. But this revival of ceremonial became the characteristic of the new movement, and “Ritualist” thrust “Puseyite” aside. Pivotal in his own teaching was the appeal to primitive antiquity, which proved influential.

Pusey edited a series of translations of the work of the Church fathers. Among the translators was his contemporary at Christ Church, Charles Dodgson. He also befriended and assisted Dodgson’s son “Lewis Carroll” when he came to Christ Church.

Pusey is honored with a feast day on the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church (USA) on September 18.

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First ECO Agents book available Those who follow me for a long time know that I also write in other fields aside from Regency Romance and the historical novels I do. A few months ago, before the end of last year and after 2011 NaNoWriMo, (where I wrote the first draft of another Regency) I started work on a project with my younger brother Douglas (All three of my brothers are younger brothers.) The premise, as he is now an educator but once was a full on scientist at the NHI and FBI (Very cloak and dagger chemistry.) was that with the world having become green, and more green aware every week, why not have a group of prodigies, studying at a higher learning educational facility tackle the ills that have now begun to beset the world. So it is now released. We are trickling it out to the major online channels and through Amazon it will be available in trade paperback. Available at Amazon for your Kindle, or your Kindle apps and other online bookstores. For $5.99 you can get this collaboration between the brothers Wilkin. Or get it for every teenager you know who has access to a Kindle or other eReader.

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Five young people are all that stands between a better world and corporate destruction. Parker, Priya, JCubed, Guillermo and Jennifer are not just your average high school students. They are ECOAgents, trusted the world over with protecting the planet. Our Earth is in trouble. Humanity has damaged our home. Billionaire scientist turned educator, Dr. Daniel Phillips-Lee, is using his vast resources to reverse this situation. Zedadiah Carter, leader of the Earth’s most powerful company, is only getting richer, harvesting resources, with the aid of not so trustworthy employees. When the company threatens part of the world’s water supply, covering up their involvement is business as usual. The Ecological Conservation Organization’s Academy of Higher Learning and Scientific Achievement, or simply the ECO Academy, high in the hills of Malibu, California overlooking the Pacific Ocean, is the envy of educational institutions worldwide. The teenage students of the ECO Academy, among the best and brightest the planet has to offer, have decided they cannot just watch the world self-destruct. They will meet this challenge head on as they begin to heal the planet.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

George Cowper 6th Earl Cowper
26 June 1806 – 15 April 1856

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George Augustus Frederick Cowper

Styled Viscount Fordwich until 1837, was a British Whig politician. He served briefly as Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs under his uncle Lord Melbourne in 1834.

Cowper was the eldest son of Peter Clavering-Cowper, 5th Earl Cowper, and his wife Emily Lamb, daughter of Peniston Lamb, 1st Viscount Melbourne, sister of Prime Minister William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, and a leading figure in Regency society. William Cowper-Temple, 1st Baron Mount Temple, was his younger brother. His mother married as her second husband the future Prime Minister Henry Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston, in 1839.

Cowper entered the House of Commons for Canterbury in the 1830 general election, and served briefly under his uncle Lord Melbourne as Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs between November and December 1834. He lost his seat in Parliament in the 1835 general election. Two years later he succeeded his father in the earldom. Between 1846 and 1856 he served as Lord-Lieutenant of Kent.

Lord Cowper married Lady Anne Florence de Grey (who after her husband’s death succeeded as sixth Baroness Lucas of Crudwell), daughter of Thomas de Grey, 2nd Earl de Grey, in 1833. They had two sons and four daughters. Their second son the Honourable Henry Cowper sat as Member of Parliament for Hertfordshire for many years. Lord Cowper died in April 1856, aged 49, and was succeeded in the earldom by his eldest son Francis. Lady Cowper died in 1880.

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Trolling’s Pass and Present Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but I also have delved into Fantasy. The Trolling series, (the first three are in print) is the story of a man, Humphrey. We meet him as he has left youth and become a man with a man’s responsibilities. We follow him in a series of stories that encompass the stages of life. We see him when he starts his family, when he has older sons and the father son dynamic is tested. We see him when his children begin to marry and have children, and at the end of his life when those he has loved, and those who were his friends proceed him over the threshold into death. All this while he serves a kingdom troubled by monsters. Troubles that he and his friends will learn to deal with and rectify. It is now available in a variety of formats. For $2.99 you can get this fantasy adventure.

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Years since their battles with the Trolls, even on foreign soil, the warriors of the Valley Kingdom of Torahn need something to keep their edge honed. The economy too is beginning to fray a little without the great wars to support. The Leaders hit upon the idea of searching for a path to reach the east side of the continent. The Elves swear that at one time their writings tell of such, the Dwarves swear such a pass across Teantellen is legendary. Teantellen though is filled with races man has never gotten along with well. Goblins, Dark Elves, Trolls, Giants and Dragons. It has been years since the mountain tops exploded, and perhaps that has changed things enough that a way can be found to link the western lands with the eastern lands and increase trade, and prosperity for all. Even should they fail in their quest, as the history of man has shown to this point in time, the attempt will do much to spur the economy. Tens of thousands of gold will be spent by the Council of Twenty-One to pay for such an expedition. Gold that those who are not so scrupulous might choose to pocket as they tried in the Troll Wars. With such shenanigans taking place again, are the hopes of the previous generation, the leaders from the Troll Wars now in retirement, ready to be achieved? Is it time for Torahn, called the Valley Kingdom, but the only Kingdom without a King, to have a King once more?

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Hussey Vivian 1st Baron Vivian
28 July 1775 – 20 August 1842

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Hussey Vivian

Educated at Truro Grammar School, then at Harrow and Exeter College, Oxford, Vivian entered the army in 1793, and less than a year later became a captain in the 28th Foot. Under Lord Moira he served in the campaign of 1794 in Flanders and the Netherlands. At the end of the expedition, the 28th bore a distinguished part in Lord Cathcart’s action of Geldermalsen. In 1798 Vivian was transferred to the 7th Light Dragoons (later Hussars), and in Sir Ralph Abercromby’s division was present in the Helder campaign in Holland at the battles of Bergen and Alkmaar (19 September to 6 October 1799).

In 1800 he received his majority, and in 1804 he became Lieutenant Colonel of the 7th. In command of this regiment he sailed to join Lieutenant-General Sir David Baird at Corunna in 1808, and took part in Lord Henry Paget’s cavalry fights at Sahagún and Benavente. During the retreat of Lieut-General Sir John Moore’s army the 7th were constantly employed with the rearguard. Vivian was present at the Battle of Corunna, and returned with the remainder of the army to England. It was not until September 1813 that the 7th returned to the Peninsula. On 24 November, Vivian (now colonel and aide-de-camp to the Prince Regent) was appointed to command a light cavalry brigade (13th and 14th Light Dragoons) under Rowland Hill, 1st Viscount Hill in Wellington’s army. With this corps he served at the Battle of the Nive (9–13 December).

In January 1814, Vivian transferred to lead a light cavalry brigade in William Carr Beresford’s corps. The 1,000-strong unit included the 18th Hussars and the 1st King’s German Legion Hussars. Vivian took a marked part in the action of Gave de Pau and the Battle of Orthez. On 8 April, Vivian fought a brilliant action at Croix d’Orade on the Ers River, where he was very severely wounded. In this clash, the 18th Hussars seized a key bridge intact, helping Wellington to isolate the French defenders of Toulouse. At the beginning of 1815 he was made KCB; he had been a Major General for several months.

In April 1815, Sir Hussey Vivian was appointed to command the 6th Brigade of Henry Paget, the Earl of Uxbridge’s Cavalry Division. Vivian’s brigade included the 10th and 18th Hussars and the 1st Hussars KGL. At the Battle of Waterloo the 6th Brigade was posted on the Duke of Wellington’s left flank. In the late afternoon, Vivian’s regiments, with those of Vandeleur’s 4th Brigade, were moved to support the hard-pressed center of the line. After the repulse of Napoleon’s Imperial Guard, Vivian’s hussars made the final charge of the day between Hougomont and La Haye Sainte, sweeping everything before them. This service was rewarded by the thanks of both houses of Parliament, the KCH, and the orders of Maria Theresa and St. Vladimir from the emperors of Austria and Russia.

Vivian sat in the House of Commons as member for Truro from 1821 to 1831; he was then made commander of the forces in Ireland, and given the GCH. He was also appointed to the Privy Council of Ireland in 1831. In 1835 he became Master-General of the Ordnance, and was appointed to the Privy Council of the United Kingdom. In 1837 he received the GCB, and in 1841, being then M.P. for East Cornwall, was created Baron Vivian in the English peerage. A year later he died at Baden-Baden. He was twice married (first in 1804), and the title descended in the direct line.

His natural son, Sir Robert John Hussey Vivian (1802–1887), was a famous soldier in India, who in 1857 was made K.C.B. and in 1871 G.C.B., having previously attained the rank of general.

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