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Archive for April, 2014

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Lord Henry John Spencer
20 December 1770 – 3 July 1795

Lord Henry John Spencer was the second son of George Spencer, 4th Duke of Marlborough and his wife, Caroline and was educated at Eton College and Christ Church, Oxford.

In 1790, he was elected Member of Parliament for Woodstock and was briefly secretary to Lord Auckland, British Ambassador at The Hague that year.

From 1790 to 1793, he was himself ambassador until transferring to Sweden in 1793. In 1795, he was transferred to Prussia but died of fever at Berlin on 3 July, aged twenty-four.

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Trolling’s Pass and Present

Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but I also have delved into Fantasy. The Trolling series, (the first three are in print) is the story of a man, Humphrey.

We meet him as he has left youth and become a man with a man’s responsibilities. We follow him in a series of stories that encompass the stages of life.

We see him when he starts his family, when he has older sons and the father son dynamic is tested. We see him when his children begin to marry and have children, and at the end of his life when those he has loved, and those who were his friends proceed him over the threshold into death.

All this while he serves a kingdom troubled by monsters. Troubles that he and his friends will learn to deal with and rectify.

It is now available in a variety of formats. For $2.99 you can get this fantasy adventure.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

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Amazon for your Kindle

Years since their battles with the Trolls, even on foreign soil, the warriors of the Valley Kingdom of Torahn need something to keep their edge honed.

The economy too is beginning to fray a little without the great wars to support. The Leaders hit upon the idea of searching for a path to reach the east side of the continent.

The Elves swear that at one time their writings tell of such, the Dwarves swear such a pass across Teantellen is legendary. Teantellen though is filled with races man has never gotten along with well. Goblins, Dark Elves, Trolls, Giants and Dragons.

It has been years since the mountain tops exploded, and perhaps that has changed things enough that a way can be found to link the western lands with the eastern lands and increase trade, and prosperity for all. Even should they fail in their quest, as the history of man has shown to this point in time, the attempt will do much to spur the economy.

Tens of thousands of gold will be spent by the Council of Twenty-One to pay for such an expedition. Gold that those who are not so scrupulous might choose to pocket as they tried in the Troll Wars.

With such shenanigans taking place again, are the hopes of the previous generation, the leaders from the Troll Wars now in retirement, ready to be achieved? Is it time for Torahn, called the Valley Kingdom, but the only Kingdom without a King, to have a King once more?

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If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

George FitzRoy 4th Duke of Grafton
14 January 1760 – 28 September 1844

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George FitzRoy

George FitzRoy 4th Duke of Grafton styled Earl of Euston until 1811, was a British peer and Whig politician.

Euston was the son of Augustus Fitzroy, 3rd Duke of Grafton and his wife Anne, daughter of Henry Liddell, 1st Baron Ravensworth. He was educated at Harrow School and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he became a close friend of the William Pitt the Younger. From 1782-84, he was Member of Parliament for Thetford, and in 1784, he and Pitt were elected as MPs for Cambridge University. Euston held that seat until he succeeded his father in the dukedom in 1811 and then became a member of the House of Lords.

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Charlotte Maria Waldegrave

Grafton married Lady Charlotte Maria Waldegrave (1761–1808), daughter of James Waldegrave, 2nd Earl Waldegrave, on 16 November 1784 at Navestock, Essex. They had eleven children:

  • Lady Maria (Mary) Anne (1785–1855), married Sir William Oglander, 6th Baronet and had issue.
  • Lady Georgiana (1787–1855), unmarried
  • Lady Elizabeth Anne (1788–1867), married her first cousin John Henry Smyth and had issue.
  • Henry, styled Earl of Euston, later 5th Duke of Grafton (1790–1863)
  • Lord Charles FitzRoy (1791–1865), married Lady Anne Cavendish (daughter of George Cavendish, 1st Earl of Burlington) and had issue.
  • Lady Isabella Frances (1792–1875), married Henry Joseph St. John (d. 1857)
  • Lord William FitzRoy (1794–1804)
  • Lord Hugh FitzRoy (1795–1797)
  • Lord Richard FitzRoy (1798–1798)
  • Lord Richard FitzRoy (1800–1801)
  • Lord James FitzRoy (1804–1834)

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The Shattered Mirror

For your enjoyment, one of the Regency Romances I published. It is available for sale and now at a reduced price, and I hope that you will take the opportunity to order your copy.

Order for yourself or as a gift. It is now available in a variety of formats. For just a few dollars this Regency Romance can be yours for your eReaders or physically in Trade Paperback.

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and in Trade Paperback
Bridget Halifax-Stokes was giddy with the excitement of her season in London. Town had beckoned and her season came on the heels of the end of the war against the tyrant.

All the handsome men were returning heroes. What better year to come out.

Her father thought it all nonsense. Her mother believed that it would be the best showing of any of her daughters.

More lords available and luck that Bridget was just the perfect age.

All is fun and frivolity until Bridget literally crashes into Sir Patrick Hampton as he limps along the high street. A man she knew once well, now a stranger with dark and foreboding eyes.

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If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

George Stewart 8th Earl of Galloway
24 March 1768 – 27 March 1834

Stewart was the eldest son of John Stewart, 7th Earl of Galloway, and Anne, daughter of Sir James Dashwood, 2nd Baronet. He attended Westminster School before joinging the Royal Navy.

Known as Lord Garlies he entered the navy serving as a 13-year old midshipman under the command of his uncle, Commodore Keith Stewart at the Battle of Dogger Bank in August 1781, and also in the Great Siege of Gibraltar in 1782.

In 1789 promoted to lieutenant, serving in the frigate Aquilon in the Mediterranean. He returned to England in early 1790, when appointed commander of the fire ship Vulcan. He was promoted to post-captain in 1793, and soon after was appointed to the frigate Winchelsea, serving in the West Indies, and being wounded while covering the landing of the army at Guadaloupe in 1794.Then sent with detachments of troops to accept the surrender of the islands of Marie-Galante and La Désirade.

In 1795 he took command of the frigate Lively, and took Sir John Jervis out from England to assume command in the Mediterranean, and serving there until the Battle of Cape St Vincent in February 1797. After the battle Lively carried Sir Robert Calder, with the account of the victory, and Lord Minto, Viceroy of Corsica, and his suite, who were on board during the battle, back to England.

Around November 1799 Garlies commissioned the frigate Hussar, and commanded her in the Channel and on the coast of Ireland until early 1801, making several captures and recaptures:

  • On 17 May 1800 Hussar, the frigate Loire and the schooner Milbrook recaptured the ship Princess Charlotte, and captured the French schooner La Francoise.
  • On 2 March 1801 Hussar captured the French schooner Le General Bessieres.
  • On 12 April 1801 Hussar recaptured the ship James of Liverpool.

In early 1801 Garlies moved into the Bellerophon, to serve on the blockade of Brest, remaining there until the Treaty of Amiens in early 1802 brought a short-lived period of peace. Following the renewal of hostilities in 1803 he commanded the ship Ajax, and sat on the Board of Admiralty in between May 1805 and February 1806. Galloway saw no further active service, but was promoted to Rear-Admiral in 1810; to Vice Admiral in 1819; and to Admiral in 1830.

Apart from his military career Garlies also sat as a Member of Parliament. He was first elected in 1790 for the constituency of Saltash, and served until vacating his seat in favour of his brother William in February 1795.

He returned to Parliament when elected MP for Cockermouth on in 1805, and then sat for Haslemere after the 1806 election, but was shortly after obliged to quit his seat following the death of his father on 13 November, when he became the Earl of Galloway, and moved to the House of Lords.

He served as Lord Lieutenant of Kirkcudbright from 1794 to 1807, and from 1820 to 1828, and of Wigtownshire from 1807 to 1828. In 1814 he was invested as a member of the Order of the Thistle. He also served as Vice-President of Board of Agriculture in 1815.

In April 1797 he married Lady Jane Paget, the daughter of Henry Paget, 1st Earl of Uxbridge, and sister of Henry Paget, 1st Marquess of Anglesey. They had eight children:

  1. Lady Jane Stewart (1798–1844), m. George Spencer-Churchill, 6th Duke of Marlborough.
  2. Lady Caroline Stewart (1799–1857)
  3. Hon. Randolph Stewart, later 9th Earl of Galloway (1800–1873)
  4. Lady Louisa Stewart (1804–1889), m. William Duncombe, 2nd Baron Feversham.
  5. Hon. Arthur Stewart (1805–1806)
  6. Hon. Alan Stewart (1807–1808)
  7. Lady Helen Stewart (1810–1813)
  8. Vice Admiral Hon. Keith Stewart CB (1814–1879)

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Trolling Down to Old Mah Wee

Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but I also have delved into Fantasy.

The Trolling series, (the first three are in print) is the story of a man, Humphrey. We meet him as he has left youth and become a man with a man’s responsibilities. We follow him in a series of stories that encompass the stages of life.

We see him when he starts his family, when he has older sons and the father son dynamic is tested. We see him when his children begin to marry and have children, and at the end of his life when those he has loved, and those who were his friends proceed him over the threshold into death.

All this while he serves a kingdom troubled by monsters. Troubles that he and his friends will learn to deal with and rectify. It is now available in a variety of formats.

For $2.99 you can get this 2nd book in the fantasy adventure series of Humphrey and Gwendolyn.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

Amazon for your Kindle

When the neighboring kingdom of Mah Wee begins to experience the same problems that beset Torahn some years before, they urgently request the aid of the experts in containing a new Troll infestation. But eradicating Trolls is not as easy as exterminating a few rats or mice.

Trolls are bigger than men, they are stronger than men, and then are meaner than men. Humphrey Cutter and his band of mismatched warriors must once again rise to the occasion, but can they without the aid of expertise of Gwendolyn and her particular skills?   

Mah Wee, an ancient kingdom, with a monarch more steeped in the rights of being a king rather than the obligations and duties that a king should be. Here Humphrey and his crew finds that they have more than Trolls to overcome if they are to save Mah Wee from the same or nearly similar problems that they faced before in Torahn.

But, as Humphrey knows, nothing can truly be accomplished if the lovely Gwendolyn is not able to lend her aid as well.

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If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Robert Jocelyn 3rd Earl of Roden
27 October 1788 – 20 March 1870

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Robert Jocelyn

Jocelyn was the son of Robert Jocelyn, 2nd Earl of Roden, and Frances Theodosia, daughter of the Very Reverend Robert Bligh, Dean of Elphin.

A Tory, Jocelyn was Member of Parliament for County Louth from 1806 to 1807 and from 1810 to 1820. Then he succeeded his father as Earl. In March 1812 he was sworn of the Privy Council and appointed Treasurer of the Household under Spencer Perceval. He retained the office when Lord Liverpool became Prime Minister after Perceval’s assassination. In July 1812 he was made Vice-Chamberlain of the Household, a post he held for the rest of the Liverpool administration.

In 1821 he was created Baron Clanbrassil, of Hyde Hall in the County of Hertford and Dundalk in the County of Louth, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, which entitled him to an automatic seat in the House of Lords. The same year, on 20 August 1821, he was also appointed a Knight of the Order of St Patrick. In 1858 he was sworn of the Irish Privy Council.

Despite Lord Roden’s political career, he is best remembered for his strong support for Protestant causes in the north of Ireland and elsewhere. He supported religious societies such as the Hibernian Bible Society, the Sunday School Society, the Evangelical Alliance and the Protestant Orphan Society, and also conducted service in the private chapel at Tullymore Park, Castlewellan, County Down, his chief residence in Ireland. He was an important leader in the Orange Order, eventually rising to the rank of Grand Master.

However, in 1849 a clash took part between Orangeman and Roman Catholics at Dolly’s Brae, near Castlewellan, in which several people were killed after he had invited the Orangemen onto his estate and addressed them, urging them to “do their duty as loyal, Protestant men”. A commission was set up to examine the event, and criticized Roden for his conduct. As a result of this he was removed from his position as a member of the Commission of the Peace. (DWW and 9 years later sworn to the Irish Privy Council. It sounds like he incited a riot that caused deaths and was later patted on the back for it.)

Lord Roden was twice married. He married firstly the Hon. Maria Frances Catherine, daughter of Thomas Stapleton, 16th Baron le Despencer, on 9 January 1813. They had three sons and three daughters. His eldest son, Robert Jocelyn, Viscount Jocelyn, was also a politician, but predeceased his father.

After Roden’s first wife’s death on 25 February 1861, he married secondly Clementina Janet, daughter of Thomas Andrews, of Greenknowes, and widow of Captain Robert Lushington Reilly, of Scarva, County Down, on 16 August 1862. They had no children.

In later life Lord Roden spent time in Edinburgh, Scotland, for his health. He died, aged 81, and was succeeded in the earldom by his grandson, Robert, the son of Viscount Jocelyn. The Countess of Roden died on 9 July 1903.

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