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Archive for April, 2013

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Samuel Bagster the Younger
October 19 1800 – July 1 1835

Bagster was the eldest son of Samuel Bagster, 1772-1851. He was educated at a school at Oxford and was articled to his father in 1815. In October 1822 he joined the Baptist church in Blackfriars. Bagster commenced business for himself in 1824 as a printer in Bartholomew Close.

He married Miss Elizabeth Hunt in 1825. Samuel was well read in the natural history of bees, and during the summer of 1834 published, ‘The Management of Bees‘. It distilled the vast literature on bees. It sold well.

He contributed ‘The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge‘ to his father’s polyglot series. His business steadily increased in extent. Many of the polyglot bibles and other learned publications of Messrs. Bagster & Sons came from his press.
Bagster occupied some of his leisure in poultry-breeding and bee-keeping.

Ill health led to Samuel retiring from business he remained active in antislavery and temperance. He died at his residence, Aldine Cottage, on 1 July 1835.

Works

  1. The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge
  2. The Management of Bees, with a description of the “Ladies Safety-hive,” with 40 illustrative wood engravings
  3. Spiritual Honey from Natural Hives, or Meditations and Observations on the Natural History and Habits of Bees, first introduced to public notice in 1657 by S. Purchas, M.A.

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TODAY!!!! Tuesday April 30th

Between 2 PM and 9 PM CDT

Stop by the Facebook Page

Come to this Facebook event and meet the eight talented authors who have made MMSA a delightful excursion into fantasy and adventure. Join them as they expand such classics as David Copperfield, A Christmas Carol, The Phantom of the Opera, and Frankenstein! It’s going to be a blast.

Authors: Alyson Grauer, Anika Arrington, A. F. Stewart, Aaron and Belinda Sikes, David W. Wilkin, Megan Wiseman, Neve Talbot, and Scott William Taylor.

How online events work:

1. Guests “arrive” by loading this event page.
2. Authors use the event page feed (on Facebook) to post comments, ask questions, level challenges, and make announcements. Think, party games, complete with prizes. These are invariably related to the author or the book.
3. Authors put themselves in the hot seat, as guests pepper them with questions.
4. Everyone has a great time, gets stoked about the book and runs out and buys one right away!
5. Fun had by all.

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We’ll All Go A Trolling
Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but I also have delved into Fantasy. The Trolling series is the story of a man, Humphrey. We meet him as he has left youth and become a man with a man’s responsibilities. We follow him in a series of stories that encompass the stages of life. We see him when he starts his family, when he has older sons and the father son dynamic is tested. We see him when his children begin to marry and have children, and at the end of his life when those he has loved, and those who were his friends proceed him over the threshold into death.
All this while he serves a kingdom troubled by monsters. Troubles that he and his friends will learn to deal with and rectify.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For $2.99 you can get this fantasy adventure.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

Amazon for your Kindle
King Humphrey, retired, has his 80th birthday approaching. An event that he is not looking forward to. A milestone, of course, but he has found traveling to Torc, the capital of the Valley Kingdom of Torahn, a trial. He enjoys his life in the country, far enough from the center of power where his son Daniel now is King and rules.

Peaceful days sitting on the porch. Reading, writing, passing the time with his guardsmen, his wife, and the visits of his grandson who has moved into a manor very near. Why go to Torc where he was to be honored, but would certainly have a fight with his son, the current king.

The two were just never going to see eye to eye, and Humphrey, at the age of 80, was no longer so concerned with all that happened to others. He was waiting for his audience with the Gods where all his friends had preceded him. It would be his time soon enough.

Yet, the kingdom wanted him to attend the celebrations, and there were to be many. So many feasts and fireworks he could not keep track, but the most important came at the end, when word was brought that the Trolls were attacking once more.

Now Humphrey would sit as regent for his son, who went off to fight the ancient enemy. Humphrey had ruled the kingdom before, so it should not have been overwhelming, but at eighty, even the little things could prove troublesome.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.        

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Richard Barry 7th Earl of Barrymore
14 August 1769 – 6 March 1793

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Richard Barry as Cupid

Richard Barry, 7th Earl of Barrymore was an English nobleman of Ireland, as well as an infamous rake, gambler, sportsman, theatrical enthusiast and womanizer.

He was known as Hellgate and the Rake of Rakes.

Barrymore was born on in 1769 in Marylebone, to Richard Barry, 6th Earl of Barrymore and Amelia Stanhope, daughter of William Stanhope, 2nd Earl of Harrington. He succeeded as Earl of Barrymore in 1773 when three. His mother placed him under the care of the vicar of Wargrave.

He was educated at Eton College, arriving with a sum of £1,000 in his pocket. He regularly would go to London several times a week in order to satisfy his sexual appetite. He was a noted prankster, attractive to the future George IV. Barry became a member of Prinny’s set.

One of his most favoured practical jokes would involve pretending to kidnap girls from the streets of London and place coffins outside of their houses with a view to terrifying their servants. He was infamous as a gambler.

He was heavily in debt before marrying, but married Charlotte Goulding, niece of Lettia Lade, the daughter of a common sedan chairman in 1792. After his death, she fell into prostitution.

His sister Carolina was known as “Billingsgate”, due to her use of foul language.
Henry, his younger brother, was “Cripplegate”.
His youngest brother Augustus was nicknamed “Newgate”.

Barrymore became a well-known sportsman, particularly in cricket, running, horse-racing, boxing and swordsmanship. He bred his own race-horses and rode as his own jockey. He was especially famous for placing huge bets on both these sports and other extraordinarily ludicrous challenges.

He made two known appearances in first-class cricket matches from 1791 to 1792, playing as a member of the Brighton Cricket Club.
His first love was the theatre. He built and ran one in Wargrave. He even acted there himself.
He was Member of Parliament for Heytesbury from 1791.

Barrymore had been commissioned in 1789 and was later promoted Lieutenant in the Royal Berkshire Militia. He was accidentally killed at Folkestone on in 1793. His musket discharged while escorting French prisoners of war to Dover.

Despite fears of bankruptcy, Barrymore died in unexpected solvency.

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The End of the World
This is the first of the Regency Romances I published. It is available for sale and I hope that you will take the opportunity to order your copy for the holiday season. For yourself or as a gift.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For $7.99 you can get this Regency Romance for your eReader. A little more as an actual physical book.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

iBookstore

Amazon for your Kindle and as a Trade Paperback
Hermione Merwyn leads a pleasant, quiet life with her father, in the farthest corner of England. All is as it should be, though change is sure to come.  For she and her sister have reached the age of marriage, but that can be no great adventure when life at home has already been so bountiful.

When Samuel Lynchhammer arrives in Cornwall, having journeyed the width of the country, he is down to his last few quid and needs to find work for his keep. Spurned by the most successful mine owner in the county, Gavin Tadcaster, Samuel finds work for Gavin’s adversary, Sir Lawrence Merwyn.

Can working for Sir Lawrence, the father of two young women on the cusp of their first season to far away London, be what Samuel needs to help him resolve the reasons for his running away from his obligations in the east of the country? Will the daughters be able to find happiness in the desolate landscapes and deadly mines of their home?

When a stranger arrives in Cornwall while the war rages on the Peninsula, is he the answer to one’s prayers, or a nightmare wearing the disguise of a gentleman?

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

Read Full Post »

MMSA-2013-04-28-09-07.jpg

On Tuesday April 30th

Between 2 PM and 9 PM CDT

Stop by the Facebook Page

Come to this Facebook event and meet the eight talented authors who have made MMSA a delightful excursion into fantasy and adventure. Join them as they expand such classics as David Copperfield, A Christmas Carol, The Phantom of the Opera, and Frankenstein! It’s going to be a blast.

Authors: Alyson Grauer, Anika Arrington, A. F. Stewart, Aaron and Belinda Sikes, David W. Wilkin, Megan Wiseman, Neve Talbot, and Scott William Taylor.

How online events work:

1. Guests “arrive” by loading this event page.
2. Authors use the event page feed (on Facebook) to post comments, ask questions, level challenges, and make announcements. Think, party games, complete with prizes. These are invariably related to the author or the book.
3. Authors put themselves in the hot seat, as guests pepper them with questions.
4. Everyone has a great time, gets stoked about the book and runs out and buys one right away!
5. Fun had by all.

Read Full Post »

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

William Gell
1 April 1777 – 4 February 1836

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William Gell

Born at Hopton, the son of Philip Gell and Dorothy Milnes. The Gell family was one of the oldest families in England with a tradition of service in the Army, Navy, Parliament and the Church going back to 1209. His great grandfather was the parliamentarian Sir John Gell and his uncle was Admiral John Gell.

Gell was educated at Derby School and Emmanuel College, Cambridge. He matriculated there in 1793, took a BA degree in 1798 and an MA in 1804.

William Gell was a great friend of Thomas Moore, Walter Scott and Lord Byron. He wrote many books, and illustrated with his own sketches. In 1801, he was sent on his first diplomatic mission to Greece where he fixed the site of Troy at Bournabiski. Lord Byron mentions him in his work

From 1804 to 1806 he travelled in Greece. In 1807 he was elected a Member of the Society of Dilettanti and a Fellow of the Royal Society.

In 1811he was commissioned to explore Greece and Asia Minor. These travels resulted in several publications, e.g. Geography and Antiquities of Ithaca and Itinerary of Greece, with a Commentary on Pausanias and Strabo.

With these publications he achieved fame. He went with Princess Caroline to Italy in 1814 as one of her chamberlains. He gave evidence in her favour at her trial before the House of Lords, stating that he had left her service merely on account of a fit of the gout and had seen no impropriety between Caroloine and her courtier, Bergami.

Though, in letters, written under such pseudonyms, Gell related bits of scandal about the Queen. He was Knighted in 1814. Gell was a close friend of Keppel Richard Craven and travelled around Italy with him.

From 1820 until his death, he resided in Italy. He painted. He received visitors including Sir William Drummond, the Hon. Keppel Craven, John Auldjo, Lady Blessington and Sir Walter Scott.

Crippled by gout, Sir William took Scott to Pompeii and showed him around the excavations. After Scott’s death, Sir William wrote an account of their conversations in Naples. He published some of his best known archaeological work including Pompeiana and The Topography of Troy.

Gell died at Naples in 1836. He left all his personal belongings to Craven.

Works

  • A Tour in the Lakes Made in 1797
  • The Topography of Troy and its vicinity illustrated and explained by drawings and descriptions etc.. London, 1804
  • The Geography and Antiquities of Ithaca. London, 1807
  • The Itinerary of Greece, with a commentary on Pausanias and Strabo, and an account of the Monuments of Antiquity at present existing in that country, compiled in the years 1801, 2, 5, 6 etc.. London, 1810.
  • The Itinerary of the Morea, being a description of the Routes of that Peninsula. London, 1817
  • Vievs in Barbary – taken in 1813. London, 1815
  • Pompeiana. The Topography of Edifices and Ornaments of Pompeii. 2 vols. London, 1817-8.
  • Narrative of a Journey in the Morea. London, 1823
  • Le Mura di Roma disegnate sa Sir W. Gell, illustrates con testo note da A. Nibby. Rome, 1820
  • Probestücke von Städtemauern des alten Griechenlands … Aus dem Englischen übersetzt. Munich, 1831
  • The Topography of Rome and its Vicinity with Map”. 2 vols. London, 1834.
  • Analisi storico-topografico-antiquaria della carta de’ dintorni di Roma secondo le osservazione di Sir W. Gell e del professore A. Nibby. Rome 1837

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