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Posts Tagged ‘Regency Lexicon’

Evolution

Since joining the English Historical Fiction Authors, many who follow my blog will have noted that I stepped up my game with it. A lot more history has been presented here, including such articles on Regency Money, The Prime Ministers of the Regency, The Regency Timeline and the Regency Lexicon. All these pages have detailed followups at various parts of the Regency Assembly Press website.

Recently I have started biographies or the Regency Personalties Series, having done so far

Previous Notables (Click to see the Blog):
George III
George IV
William IV
Lady Hester Stanhope
Princess Charlotte
Queen Charlotte
Princess Caroline
Queen Adelaide
Dorothea Jordan
Maria Fitzherbert

There will be many other notables coming, a full and changing list can be found here on the blog as I keep adding to it. The list so far is:

Lord Byron
Shelley
Keats
Jane Austen
Lady Caroline Lamb
Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire
Charles James Fox
William Wilberforce
Thomas Clarkson
Hannah More
Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Edmund Kean
John Phillip Kemble
John Burgoyne
Harriet Mellon
Mary Robinson
Wellington (the Military man)
Nelson
Howe
St. Vincent
Packenham
General Banastre Tarleton
Henry Paget
Stapleton Cotton
Thomas Picton
Constable
Lawrence
Cruikshank
Gillray
Rowlandson

Patronesses of Almacks
Emily Lamb, Lady Cowper
Amelia Stewart, Viscountess Castlereagh
Sarah Villiers, Countess of Jersey
Maria Molyneux, Countess of Sefton
Mrs. Drummond Burrell
Dorothea Lieven, Countess de Lieven, wife of the Russian Ambassador
Countess Esterhazy, wife of the Austrian Ambassador

Widgets

If you take a look at the sidebar on the right (and even click on the links to the books and buy a few) you will notice that there are now some hyperlink widgets to previous posts, so they will be easy to find. There are even a double list for some where the website has more detail then the old blog posts that are here.

The plan will be to have much of the references of the history from the blog displayed on the right sidebar (also giving you a chance to buy some of my works, the only way I can afford to go to the supermarket to get food) including a list linking you to the Prime Ministers, the Lexicon, and other research that has been posted here.

Kickstarter

For those who have been following the Sunday Posts, they know that this is the day we release another chapter in the Duology, Steam and Thunder. So far we have released 8 chapters and that is over half of the first book. This is a call for artists who would like to be paid, should the book go to print, and copyeditors. The plan is to make this a well done KickStarter project. With interior illustrations. We need quotes though so we can price out the project. Please get in touch with us.

NaNo Novel

It is that time of year again, and next week we begin the first draft of Food and Art. A contemporary romance. During NaNoWriMo I shall be hard at work to do a post of the Regency Personalities, write 20 pages a day, look for work, and edit more of The Prize is Not As Great As You Think, our Ruritania Romance that goes up on Wednesdays.

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Giveaway

Our winner was Ambre who came up with “A Trifling Disguised.”

For those who would like to get the prize for themselves, it is on sale at Amazon and will be available all across the internet and at bookstores after November 15th.

TWO PEAS IN A POD

TwoPeasinaPod_DavidWilkin_Amazon.com_KindleStore-2012-09-7-09-42.jpg

TWO PEAS IN A POD

978-0-9829989-3-9

Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

Even though it is released in .mobi for the Kindle, I of course have the ability to send it to you in all formats for your eReaders and computers.

How to have won

But to enter the contest I should like some interaction.

1) One favorite word from the Lexicon which you can see each separate letter here in the Blog by looking at previous days postings, or go to the entire lexicon at the Regency Assembly Press website, here (Regency Lexicon)

2) (Optional) Your name of course (if you are registered and signed into WordPress then I can click back to you if you are the winner, but if you are not,) and an email or some way to get you the prize!

3) (Optional) And if you are super proactive, what eBook format you would need should you be our winner!

4) (Really Optional) Regular followers of my Blog will know about Jane Austen and Ghosts, one of our other novels. As Jane deals with old B Horror Movie legends in Jane Austen and Ghosts, we would like the name of a B movie legend (and please let us try not to repeat since it will be fun to see how many we can come up with. So to start off, I will give one as an example, Boris Karloff)

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Giveaway

My thought is to run this for a week and announce our winner next Monday, the 3rd. (Labor Day in the United States.)

This time around we are giving away an eBook of our newest release:

TWO PEAS IN A POD

TwoPeasinaPod_DavidWilkin_Amazon.com_KindleStore-2012-08-28-09-20.jpg

TWO PEAS IN A POD

978-0-9829989-3-9

Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

Even though it is released in .mobi for the Kindle, I of course have the ability to send it to you in all formats for your eReaders and computers.

How to win

But to enter the contest I should like some interaction.

1) One favorite word from the Lexicon which you can see each separate letter here in the Blog by looking at previous days postings, or go to the entire lexicon at the Regency Assembly Press website, here (Regency Lexicon)

2) (Optional) Your name of course (if you are registered and signed into WordPress then I can click back to you if you are the winner, but if you are not,) and an email or some way to get you the prize!

3) (Optional) And if you are super proactive, what eBook format you would need should you be our winner!

4) (Really Optional) Regular followers of my Blog will know about Jane Austen and Ghosts, one of our other novels. As Jane deals with old B Horror Movie legends in Jane Austen and Ghosts, we would like the name of a B movie legend (and please let us try not to repeat since it will be fun to see how many we can come up with. So to start off, I will give one as an example, Boris Karloff)

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Regency Research

For well over twenty years since I first started my infatuation with the Regency Era, I have maintained a lexicon to help me decipher Georgette Heyer (follow the link to Frederica, my favorite of her books), and others. Then as I began to write in the genre in the years 2000, I put more emphasis on it.

I have seen a few others on the web, but I have not seen any as complete as the one maintained at Regency Assembly Press that I have contributed to.

Today are the letters X, Y and Z. You probably can guess what Yoked is, and if you have been following have seen how many different ways there is to say that. But do you know what Yaffling is?

With the emphasis that has been placed recently on Research RegencyResearch-2012-07-27-08-43.jpg there, with not only the Lexicon, but the Timelines, lives of the Prime Ministers, Dance Instruction and Regency Era Money, it is a growing resource for all Regency readers and writers. I urge everyone to have a look as it continues to grow.

I also provide here the next letter of the alphabet to entice you to visit that page. Or even bookmark it for when you need to look up a particular Regency term.

  • Xantippe–The name of Socrates’s wife: now used to signify a shrew or scolding wife.
  • Yaffling–Eating–(Cant)
  • To Yam–To eat or stuff heartily.
  • Yankey, or Yankey Doodle–A booby, or country lout: a name given to the New England men in North America–A general appellation for an American.
  • Yard Of Tin–The horn, generally a yard or so long, used by the guard of a mail coach or stage coach to warn of approach and departure.
  • Yarmouth Capon–A red herring: Yarmouth is a famous place for curing herrings.
  • Yarmouth Coach–A kind of low two-wheeled cart drawn by one horse, not much unlike an Irish car.
  • Yarmouth Pye–A pye made of herrings highly spiced, which the city of Norwich is by charter bound to present annually to the king.
  • Yarum–Milk–(Cant)
  • Yea and Nay Man–A quaker, a simple fellow, one who can only answer yes, or no.
  • Yellow–To look yellow; to be jealous–I happened to call on Mr–Green, who was out: on coming home, and finding me with his wife, he began to look confounded blue, and was, I thought, a little yellow.
  • Yellow Belly–A native of the Fens of Licoinshire; an allusion to the eels caught there.
  • Yellow Boy–1 pound 1 shilling, Guinea, yellow George, (approx $2100).
  • Yellow George–1 pound 1 shilling, yellow boy, Guinea, (approx $2100).
  • To Yelp–To cry out–Yelper; a town cryer, also one apt to make great complaints on trifling occasions.
  • Yest–A contraction of yesterday.
  • Yoked–Married–A yoke; the quantum of labour performed at one spell by husbandmen, the day’s work being divided in summer into three yokes–Kentish Term.
  • Yorkshire Tyke–A Yorkshire clown–To come Yorkshire over any one; to cheat him.
  • Young One–A familiar expression of contempt for another’s ignorance, as “ah! I See you’re a young one.” How d’ye do, young one?
  • To Yowl–To cry aloud, or howl.
  • Zad–Crooked like the letter Z–He is a mere zad, or perhaps zed; a description of a very crooked or deformed person.
  • Zany–The jester, jack pudding, or merry andrew, to a mountebank.
  • Zedland–Great part of the west country, where the letter Z is substituted for S; as zee for See, zun for sun.

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Regency Research

For well over twenty years since I first started my infatuation with the Regency Era, I have maintained a lexicon to help me decipher Georgette Heyer (follow the link to Frederica, my favorite of her books), and others. Then as I began to write in the genre in the years 2000, I put more emphasis on it.

I have seen a few others on the web, but I have not seen any as complete as the one maintained at Regency Assembly Press that I have contributed to.

Today is the letter W. Do you know what you’ve done when you Wyn? Or what do when Ware Hawk is cried?

With the emphasis that has been placed recently on Research RegencyResearch-2012-07-26-08-42.jpg there, with not only the Lexicon, but the Timelines, lives of the Prime Ministers, Dance Instruction and Regency Era Money, it is a growing resource for all Regency readers and writers. I urge everyone to have a look as it continues to grow.

I also provide here the next letter of the alphabet to entice you to visit that page. Or even bookmark it for when you need to look up a particular Regency term.

  • Wabler–Footwabler; a contemptuous Term for a foot soldier, frequently used by those of the cavalry.
  • To Waddle–To go like a duck–To waddle out of Change alley as a lame duck; a Term for one who has not been able to pay his gaming debts, called his differences, on the Stock Exchange, and therefore absents himself from it.
  • Wag–An arch-frolicsome fellow.
  • Waggish–Arch, gamesome, frolicsome.
  • Wagtail–A lewd woman.
  • Waits–Musicians of the lower order, who in most towns play under the windows of the chief inhabitants at midnight, a short time before Christmas, for which they collect a christmas-box from house to house–They are said to derive their name of waits from being always in waiting to celebrate weddings and other joyous events happening within their district.
  • Wake–A country feast, commonly on the anniversary of the tutelar saint of the village, that is, the saint to whom the parish church is dedicated–Also a custom of watching the dead, called Late Wake, in use both in Ireland and Wales, where the corpse being deposited under a table, with a plate of salt on its breast, the table is covered with liquor of all sorts; and the guests, particularly, the younger part of them, amuse themselves with all kinds of pastimes and recreations: the consequence is generally more than replacing the departed friend.
  • Walking Cornet–An ensign of foot.
  • Walking Poulterer–One who steals fowls, and hawks them from door to door.
  • Walking Stationer–A hawker of pamphlets, &c.
  • Walking the Plank–A mode of destroying devoted persons or officers in a mutiny or ship-board, by blindfolding them, and obliging them to walk on a plank laid over the ship’s side; by this means, as the mutineers suppose, avoiding the penalty of murder.
  • Walking Up Against the Wall–To run up a score, which in alehouses is commonly recorded with chalk on the walls of the bar.
  • Wall–To walk or crawl up the wall; to be scored up at a public-nouse–Wall-eyed, having an eye with little or no sight, all white like a plaistered wall.
  • Waltz–The waltz was considered somewhat shocking because of the contact maintained between the partners when it was introduced in England, but it soon became quite popular–A lady required the consent of one of the Patronesses of Almack’s for her first waltz–Note, that while practiced privately by the very elite of the Ton, it was not done in public until 1814 and the visit of the Tsar.
  • Want To Pull Caps With Someone–Want to argue with them.
  • Wanton–Woman of easy virtue.
  • To Wap–To copulate, to beat–If she wont wap for a winne, let her trine for a make; if she won’t lie with a man for a penny, let her hang for a halfpenny–Mort wap-apace; a woman of experience, or very expert at the sport.
  • Wapper-Eyed–Sore-eyed.
  • Ware–A woman’s ware; her commodity.
  • Ware Hawk–An exclamation used by thieves to inform their confederates that some police officers are at hand.
  • Warm–Rich, in good circumstances–To warm, or give a man a warming; to beat him–See Chafed.
  • Warming-Pan–A large old-fashioned watch–A Scotch warming-pan; a female bedfellow.
  • Warren–One that is security for goods taken up on credit by extravagant young gentlemen–Cunny warren; a girl’s boarding-school, also a bawdy-house.
  • Wash–Paint for the face, or cosmetic water–Hog-wash; thick and bad beer.
  • Wasp–An infected prostitute, who like a wasp carries a sting in her tail.
  • Waspish–Peevish, spiteful.
  • Waste–House of waste; a tavern or alehouse, where idle people waste both their time and money.
  • Watch, Chain, and Seals–A sheep’s head And pluck.
  • Watch Fob–A short chain or ribbon with an attached medallion or ornament that connected to a man’s pocketwatch and hung from a small pocket in his waistcoat–
  • Water-Mill–A woman’s private parts.
  • Water Sneaksman–A man who steals from ships or craft on the river.
  • Water–His chops watered at it; he longed earnestly for it–To watch his waters; to keep a strict watch on any one’s actions–In hot water: in trouble, engaged in disputes.
  • Water Bewitched–Very weak punch or beer.
  • Waterpad–One that robs ships in the river Thames.
  • Watery-Headd–Apt to shed tears.
  • Water Scriger–A doctor who prescribes from inspecting the water of his patients–See Piss Prophet.
  • Waters – Taking The Waters–The waters in spa towns such as Tunbridge Wells and most notably Bath were thought to have healing powers, so to “take the waters” means to either drink or bathe in these mineral waters.
  • Wattles–Ears–(Cant)
  • Wear Arse–A one-horse chaise.
  • Wear The Willow–To mourn the loss of a love or to be lovelorn–The willow tree is associated with sorrow, e.g.: weeping willow–Willow garlands were symbols of being forsaken in love.
  • Well-Inlaid–Rich.
  • Weasal-Faced–Thin, meagre-faced–Weasel-gutted; thin-bodied; a weasel is a thin long slender animal with a sharp face.
  • Wedding–The emptying of a neoessary-hovise, particularly in London–You have been at an Irish wedding, where black eyes are given instead of favours; saying to one who has a black eye.
  • Wedge–Silver plate, because melted by the receivers of stolen goods into wedges–(Cant)
  • To Weed–To take a part–The kiddey weeded the swell’s screens; the youth took some of the gentleman’s bank notes.
  • Weeping Cross–To come home by weeping cross; to repent.
  • Welch Comb–The thumb and four fingers.
  • Welch Fiddle–The itch–See Scotch Fiddle.
  • Welch Mile–Like a Welch mile, long and narrow–His story is like a Welch mile, long and tedious.
  • Welch Rabbit, [i.e–a Welch rare-bit] Bread and cheese toasted–See Rabbit.—The Welch are said to be so remarkably fond of cheese, that in cases of difficulty their midwives apply a piece of toasted cheese to the janua vita to attract and entice the young Taffy, who on smelling it makes most vigorous efforts to come forth.
  • Welch Ejectment–To unroof the house, a method practiced by landlords in Wales to eject a bad tenant.
  • To Well–To divide unfairly–To conceal part–A cant phrase used by thieves, where one of the party conceals some of the booty, instead of dividing it fairly amongst his confederates.
  • Well-Hung–The blowen was nutts upon the kiddey because he is well-hung; the girl is pleased with the youth because his genitals are large.
  • Weston–A popular gentleman’s tailor.
  • Westminster Wedding–A match between a whore and a rogue.
  • Wet Parson–One who moistens his clay freely, in order to make it stick together.
  • Wet Quacker–One of that sect who has no objection to the spirit derived from wine.
  • Whack–A share of a booty obtained by fraud–A paddy whack; a stout brawney Irishman.
  • Whapper–A large man or woman.
  • Wheedle–A sharper–To cut a wheedle; to decoy by fawning or insinuation–(Cant)
  • Wheelband in the Nick–Regular drinking over the left thumb.
  • Whelp–An impudent whelp; a saucy boy.
  • Whereas–To follow a whereas; to become a bankrupt, to figure among princes and potentates: the notice given in the Gazette that a commission of bankruptcy is issued out against any trader, always beginning with the word whereas–He will soon march in the rear of a whereas.
  • Whet–A morning’s draught, commonly white wine, supposed to whet or sharpen the appetite.
  • Whetstone’s Park–A lane between Holborn and Lincoln’s-inn Fields, formerly famed for being the resort of women of the town.
  • Whids–Words–(Cant)
  • To Whiddle–To tell or discover–He whiddles; he peaches–He whiddles the whole scrap; he discovers all he knows–The cull whiddled because they would not tip him a snack: the fellow peached because they would not give him a share, They whiddle beef, and we must brush; they cry out thieves, and we must make off–(Cant)
  • Whiddler–An informer, or one that betrays the secrets of the gang.
  • Whiffles–A relaxation of the scrotum.
  • Whifflers–Ancient name for fifers; also persons at the universities who examine candidates for degrees–A whiffling cur, a small yelping cur.
  • Whig–The party opposed to the conservative Tories–Led by Charles James Fox and wanting constitutional monarchy–Whig was originally short for ‘whiggamor’.
  • Whimper, or Whindle–A low cry.
  • To Whine–To complain.
  • Whinyard–A sword.
  • Whip–A coachman.
  • To Whip the Cock–A piece of sport practised at wakes, horse-races, and fairs in Leicestershire: a cock being tied or fastened into a hat or basket, half a dozen carters blindfolded, and armed with their cart whips, are placed round it, who, after being turned thrice about, begin to whip the cock, which if any one strikes so as to make it cry out, it becomes his property; the joke is, that instead of whipping the cock they flog each other heartily.
  • Whip Jacks–The tenth order of the canting crew, rogues who having learned a few Sea Terms, beg with counterfeit passes, pretending to be sailors shipwrecked on the neighbouring coast, and on their way to the port from whence they sailed.
  • To Whip Off–To run away, to drink off greedily, to snatch–He whipped away from home, went to the alehouse, where he whipped off a full tankard, and coming back whipped off a fellow’s hat from his head.
  • Whip-Belly Vengeance–or pinch-gut vengeance, of which he that gets the most has the worst share–Weak or sour beer.
  • Whipper-Snapper–A diminutive fellow.
  • Whipshire–Yorkshire.
  • Whipster–A sharp or subtle fellow.
  • Whipt Syllabub–A flimsy, frothy discourse or treatise, without solidity.
  • Whirlygigs–Testicles.
  • Whisker–A great lie.
  • Whisker Splitter–A man of intrigue.
  • Whiskin–A shallow brown drinking bowl.
  • Whisky–A malt spirit much drank in Ireland and Scotland; also a one-horse chaise–See Tim Whisky.
  • Whist–A card game somewhat like bridge for two players.
  • Whistle–The throat–To wet one’s whistle; to drink.
  • Whistling Shop–Rooms in the King’s Bench and Fleet prison where drams are privately sold.
  • Whit–[i.e–Whittington’s.] Newgate–(Cant)—Five rum-padders are rubbed in the darkmans out of the whit, and are piked into the deuseaville; five highwaymen broke out of Newgate in the night, and are gone into the country.
  • White Ribbin–Gin.
  • White Feather–He has a white feather; he is a coward; an allusion to a game cock, where having a white leather is a proof he is not of the true game breed.
  • White-Livered–Cowardly, malicious.
  • White Lie–A harmless lie, one not told with a malicious intent, a lie told to reconcile people at variance.
  • White Serjeant–A man fetched from the tavern or ale-house by his wife, is said to be arrested by the white serjeant.
  • White Swelling–A woman big with child is said to have a white swelling.
  • White Tape–Geneva.
  • White Wool–Geneva.
  • Whitechapel–Whitechapel portion; two smocks, and what nature gave–Whitechapel breed; fat, ragged, and saucy: See St–Giles’s Breed–Whitechapel beau; one who dresses with a needle and thread, and undresses with a knife–To play at whist Whitechapel fashion; i.e–aces and kings first.
  • Whitewashed–One who has taken the benefit of an act of insolvency, to defraud his creditors, is said to have been whitewashed.
  • Whitfielite–A follower of George Whitfield, a Methodist.
  • Whither-Go-YYeE–A wife: wives being sometimes apt to question their husbands whither they are going.
  • Whittington’s College–Newgate; built or repaired by the famous lord mayor of that name.
  • Whore’s Bird–A debauched fellow, the largest of all birds–He sings more like a whore’s bird than a canary bird; said of one who has a strong manly voice.
  • Whore’s Curse–A piece of gold coin, value five shillings and three pence, frequently given to women of the town by such as professed always to give gold, and who before the introduction of those pieces always gave half a guinea.
  • Whore’s Kitling, or Whore’s son–A bastard.
  • Whore-Monger–A man that keeps more than one mistress–A country gentleman, who kept a female friend, being reproved by the parson of the parish, and styled a whore-monger, asked the parson whether he had a cheese in his house; and being answered in the affirmative, ‘Pray,’ says he, ‘does that one cheese make you a cheese-monger?’
  • Whore Pipe–The penis.
  • Whow Ball–A milk-maid: from their frequent use of the word whow, to make the cow stand still in milking–Ball is the supposed name of the cow.
  • Wibble–Bad drink.
  • Wibling’s Witch–The four of clubs: from one James Wibling, who in the reign of King James I–grew rich by private gaming, and was commonly observed to have that card, and never to lose a game but when he had it not.
  • Wicket–A casement; also a little door.
  • Widow’s Weeds–Mourning clothes of a peculiar fashion, denoting her state–A grass widow; a discarded mistress–a widow bewitched; a woman whose husband is abroad, and said, but not certainly known, to be dead.
  • Wife–A fetter fixed to one leg.
  • Wife in Water Colours–A mistress, or concubine; water colours being, like their engagements, easily effaced, or dissolved.
  • Wigannowns–A man wearing a large wig.
  • Wigsby–Wigsby; a man wearing a wig.
  • Wild Rogues–Rogues trained up to stealing from their cradles.
  • Wild Squirt–A looseness.
  • Wild-Goose Chase–A tedious uncertain pursuit, like the following a flock of wild geese, who are remarkably shy.
  • Willing Tit–A free horse, or a coming girl.
  • Willow–Poor, and of no reputation–To wear the willow; to be abandoned by a lover or mistress.
  • Win–A penny,
  • To Win–To steal–The cull has won a couple of Rum glimsticks; the fellow has stolen a pair of fine candlesticks.
  • Wind–To raise the wind; to procure mony.
  • Winder–Transportation for life–The blowen has napped a winder for a lift; the wench is transported for life for stealing in a shop.
  • Wind-Mill–The fundament–She has no fortune but her mills; i.e–she has nothing but her **** and arse.
  • Windfall–A legacy, or any accidental accession of property.
  • Windmills in the Head–Foolish projects.
  • Windmill Dwindled To A Nutshell–To lose one’s money.
  • Window Peeper–A collector of the window tax.
  • Windward Passage–One who uses or navigates the windward passage; a sodomite.
  • Windy–Foolish–A windy fellow; a simple fellow.
  • Winged–Injured in the arm, usually the shoulder.
  • Wink–To tip one the wink; to give a signal by winking the eye.
  • Winnings–Plunder, goods, or money acquired by theft.
  • Winter Cricket–A taylor.
  • Winter’s Day–He is like a winter’s day, short and dirty.
  • Wipe–A blow, or reproach–I’ll give you a wipe on the chops–That story gave him a fine wipe–Also a handkerchief.
  • Wiper–A handkerchief–(Cant)
  • Wiper Drawer–A pickpocket, one who steals handkerchiefs–He drew a broad, narrow, cam, or specked wiper; he picked a pocket of a broad, narrow, cambrick, or coloured handkerchief.
  • To Wiredraw–To lengthen out or extend any book, letter, or discourse.
  • Wise–As wise as Waltham’s calf, that ran nine miles to suck a bull.
  • Wise men of Gotham–Gotham is a village in Nottinghamshire; its magistrates are said to have attempted to hedge in a cuckow; a bush, called the cuckow’s bush, is still shewn in support of the tradition–A thousand other ridiculous stories are told of the men of Gotham.
  • Wiseacre–A foolish conceited fellow.
  • Wiseacre’s Hall–Gresham college.
  • Wish Someone At Jericho–Find them in the way.
  • Wit–He has as much wit as three folks, two fools and a madman.
  • Witches–Silver–Witcher bubber; a silver bowl–Witcher tilter; a silver-hilted sword–Witcher cully; a silversmith.
  • Within Ames-Ace–Near.
  • To Wobble–To boil–Pot wobbler; one who boils a pot.
  • Wolf in the Breast–An extraordinary mode of imposition, sometimes practised in the country by strolling women, who have the knack of counterfeiting extreme pain, pretending to have a small animal called a wolf in their breasts, which is continually gnawing them.
  • Wolf in the Stomach–A monstrous or canine appetite.
  • Wood–In a wood; bewildered, in a maze, in a peck of troubles, puzzled, or at a loss what course to take in any business–To look over the wood; to ascend the pulpit, to preach: I shall look over the wood at St–James’s on Sunday next–To look through the wood; to stand in the pillory–Up to the arms in wood; in the pillory.
  • Wood Pecker–A bystander, who bets whilst another plays.
  • Woodcock–A taylor with a long bill.
  • Wooden Habeas–A coffin–A man who dies in prison is said to go out with a wooden habeas–He went out with a wooden habeas; i.e–his coffin.
  • Wooden Spoon–(Cambridge.) The last junior optime–See Wrangler, Optime.
  • Wooden Horse–To fide the wooden horse was a military punishment formerly in use–This horse consisted of two or more planks about eight feet long, fixed together so as to form a sharp ridge or angle, which answered to the body of the horse–It was supported by four posts, about six feet long, for legs–A head, neck, and tail, rudely cut in wood, were added, which completed the appearance of a horse–On this sharp ridge delinquents were mounted, with their hands tied behind them; and to steady them (as it was said), and lest the horse should kick them off, one or more firelocks were tied to each leg–In this situation they were sometimes condemned to sit an hour or two; but at length it having been found to injure the soldiers materially, and sometimes to rupture them, it was left off about the time of the accession of King George I–A wooden horse was standing in the Parade at Portsmouth as late as the year 1750.
  • Wooden Ruff–The pillory–See Norway Neckcloth.
  • Wooden Surtout–A coilin.
  • Woman of the Town, or Woman of Pleasure–A prostitute.
  • Woman and her Husband–A married couple, where the woman is bigger than her husband.
  • Woman’s Conscience–Never satisfied.
  • Woman of all Work–Sometimes applied to a female servant, who refuses none of her master’s commands.
  • Woolbird–A sheep–(Cant)
  • Wool Gathering–Your wits are gone a woolgathering; saying to an absent man, one in a reverie, or absorbed in thought.
  • Woolley Crown–A soft-headed fellow.
  • Word Grubbers–Verbal critics, and also persons who use hard words in common discourse.
  • Word Pecker–A punster, one who plays upon words.
  • Word of Mouth–To drink by word of mouth, i.e–Out of the bowl or bottle instead, of a glass.
  • World–All the world and his wife; every body, a great company.
  • Worm–To worm out; to obtain the knowledge of a secret by craft, also to undermine or supplant–He is gone to the diet of worms; he is dead and buried, or gone to Rothisbone.
  • Wranglers–At Cambridge the first class (generally of twelve) at the annual examination for a degree–There are three classes of honours, wranglers, senior optimes, and junior optimes–Wranglers are said to be born with golden spoons in their mouths, the senior optimes with silver, and the junior with leaden ones–The last junior optime is called the wooden spoon–Those who are not qualified for honors are either in the Gulf (that is, meritorious, but not deserving of being in the three first classes) or among the pollot [Greek Letters] the many–See Pluck, Apostles, & C.
  • Wrap Rascal–A red cloak, called also a roquelaire.
  • Wrapt Up In Warm Flannel–Drunk with spirituous liquors–He was wrapt up in the tail of his mother’s smock; saying of any one remarkable for his success with the ladies–To be wrapt up in any one: to have a good opinion of him, or to be under his influence.
  • Wrinkle–A wrinkle-bellied whore; one who has had a number of bastards: child-bearing leaves wrinkles in a woman’s belly–To take the wrinkles out of any one’s belly; to fill it out by a hearty meal–You have one wrinkle more in your a-se; i.e–you have one piece of knowledge more than you had, every fresh piece of knowledge being supposed by the vulgar naturalists to add a wrinkle to that part.
  • Wry Mouth and a Pissen Pair of Breeches–Hanging.
  • Wry Neck Day—Hanging day.
  • Wyn–See Win.

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Regency Research

For well over twenty years since I first started my infatuation with the Regency Era, I have maintained a lexicon to help me decipher Georgette Heyer (follow the link to Frederica, my favorite of her books), and others. Then as I began to write in the genre in the years 2000, I put more emphasis on it.

I have seen a few others on the web, but I have not seen any as complete as the one maintained at Regency Assembly Press that I have contributed to.

Today is the letter V. Have you ever given your Vardy? Or do you have any idea what exactly Vessels of Paper are?

With the emphasis that has been placed recently on Research RegencyResearch-2012-07-25-08-42.jpg there, with not only the Lexicon, but the Timelines, lives of the Prime Ministers, Dance Instruction and Regency Era Money, it is a growing resource for all Regency readers and writers. I urge everyone to have a look as it continues to grow.

I also provide here the next letter of the alphabet to entice you to visit that page. Or even bookmark it for when you need to look up a particular Regency term.

  • Vagaries–Frolics, wild rambles.
  • Vail–Tips given to the servants at the manor home in which the tipper guested at.
  • Vain-Glorious, or Ostentatious Man–One who boasts without reason, or, as the canters say, pisses more than he drinks.
  • Valentine–The first woman seen by a man, or man seen by a woman, on St. Valentine’s day, the 14th of February, when it is said every bird chuses his mate for the ensuing year.
  • To Vamp–To pawn any thing. I’ll vamp it, and tip you the cole: I’ll pawn it, and give you the money. Also to refit, new dress, or rub up old hats, shoes or other wearing apparel; likewise to put new feet to old boots. Applied more particularly to a quack bookseller.
  • Vamper–Stockings.
  • Van–Madam Van; see Madam.
  • Vandyke–Named after the painter Anthony Van Dyke (1599-1641), a style of collar or trimming with a dentate (i.e–sawtooth) border in lace or fabric.
  • Van-Neck–Miss or Mrs. Van-Neck; a woman with large breasts; a bushel bubby.
  • Vardy–To give one’s vardy; i.e. verdict or opinion.
  • Varlets–Now rogues and rascals, formerly yeoman’s servants.
  • Varment–(Whip and Cambridge.) Natty, dashing. He is quite varment, he is quite the go. He sports a varment hat, coat, &c.; he is dressed like a gentleman Jehu.
  • Vaulting School–A bawdy-house; also an academy where vaulting and other manly exercises are taught.
  • Vauxhall Gardens–A pleasure garden across the Thames from fashionable London that offered a variety of entertainments including music, dancing and elaborate fireworks displays–There were also numerous dark walks suitable for assignations.
  • Velvet–To tip the velvet; to put one’s tongue into a woman’s mouth. To be upon velvet; to have the best of a bet or match. To the little gentleman in velvet, i. e. the mole that threw up the hill that caused Crop (King William’s horse) to stumble; a toast frequently drank by the tories and catholics in Ireland.
  • Venerable Monosyllable–Pudendum muliebre.
  • Venus’s Curse–The venereal disease.
  • Vessels of Paper–Half a quarter of a sheet.
  • Vicar of Bray–See Bray.
  • Vice Admiral of the Narrow Seas–A drunken man that pisses under the table into his companions’ shoes.
  • Victualling Office–The stomach.
  • Vincent’s Law–The art of cheating at cards, composed of the following associates: bankers, those who play booty; the gripe, he that betteth; and the person cheated, who is styled the vincent; the gains acquired, termage.
  • Vinegar–A name given to the person who with a whip in his hand, and a hat held before his eye, keeps the ring clear, at boxing-matches and cudgel-playing; also, in cant terms, a cloak.
  • Vingt-Et-Un–The card game known as “21” or blackjack, where the object is to take cards until one is as close as possible to 21 without going over–From the French meaning twenty-one.
  • Vixen–A termagant; also a she fox, who, when she has cubs, is remarkably fierce.
  • Vouchers–Vouchers were required to gain admittance to Almack’s Assembly Rooms–They could only be given out by one of the Patronesses.
  • To Vowel–A gamester who does not immediately pay his losings, is said to vowel the winner, by repeating the vowels I.O.U. or perhaps from giving his note for the money according to the Irish form, where the acknowledgment of the debt is expressed by the letters I.O.U. which, the sum and name of the debtor being added, is deemed a sufficient security among gentlemen.
  • Vowels–Papers indicating a debt that is owed–From the Term I.O.U.

Read Full Post »

Regency Research

For well over twenty years since I first started my infatuation with the Regency Era, I have maintained a lexicon to help me decipher Georgette Heyer (follow the link to Frederica, my favorite of her books), and others. Then as I began to write in the genre in the years 2000, I put more emphasis on it.

I have seen a few others on the web, but I have not seen any as complete as the one maintained at Regency Assembly Press that I have contributed to.

Today is the letter U. Did you know that an Ungrateful Man is a Parson? Or exactly who is an Upright Man?

With the emphasis that has been placed recently on Research RegencyResearch-2012-07-24-08-42.jpg there, with not only the Lexicon, but the Timelines, lives of the Prime Ministers, Dance Instruction and Regency Era Money, it is a growing resource for all Regency readers and writers. I urge everyone to have a look as it continues to grow.

I also provide here the next letter of the alphabet to entice you to visit that page. Or even bookmark it for when you need to look up a particular Regency term.

  • Uncle–Mine uncle’s; a necessary house. He is gone to visit his uncle; saying of one who leaves his wife soon after marriage. It likewise means a pawnbroker’s: goods pawned are frequently said to be at mine uncle’s, or laid up in lavender.
  • Understrapper–An inferior in any office, or department.
  • Under Dubber–A turnkey.
  • Under The Hatches–Without funds; in debt.
  • Unfortunate Gentlemen–The horse guards, who thus named themselves in Germany, where a general officer seeing them very awkward in bundling up their forage, asked what the devil they were; to which some of them answered, unfortunate gentlemen.
  • Unfortunate Women–Prostitutes: so termed by the virtuous and compassionate of their own sex.
  • Ungrateful Man–A parson, who at least once a week abuses his best benefactor, i.e. the devil.
  • Unguentum Aureum–A bribe.
  • Unicorn–A coach drawn by three horses. Driving Term, drive a vehicle with 3 horses, 1 in front of 2 others.
  • Unlicked Cub–A rude uncouth young fellow.
  • Unrigged–Undressed, or stripped. Unrig the drab; strip the wench.
  • Untruss–To untruss a point; to let down one’s breeches in order to ease one’s self. Breeches were formerly tied with points, which till lately were distributed to the boys every Whit Monday by the churchwardens of most of the parishes in London, under the denomination of tags: these tags were worsteds of different colours twisted up to a size somewhat thicker than packthread, and tagged at both ends with tin. Laces were at the same given to the girls.
  • Untwisted–Undone, ruined, done up.
  • Unwashed Bawdry–Rank bawdry.
  • Up To Their Gossip–To be a match for one who attempts to cheat or deceive; to be on a footing, or in the secret. I’ll be up with him; I will repay him in kind.
  • Uphills–False dice that run high. Loaded dice the roll high numbers.
  • Upper Benjamin–A great coat. (Cant)
  • Upper Orders–The highest level of society.
  • Upper Story, or Garret–Figuratively used to signify the head. His upper story or garrets are unfurnished; i.e. he is an empty or foolish fellow.
  • Upping Block–[Called in some counties a leaping stock, in others a jossing block.] Steps for mounting a horse. He sits like a toad on a jossing block; said of one who sits ungracefully on horseback.
  • Uppish–Testy, apt to take offence.
  • Upright–Go upright; a word used by shoemakers, taylors and their servants, when any money is given to make them drink, and signifies, Bring it all out in liquor, though the donor intended less, and expects change, or some of his money, to be returned. Three-penny upright. See Threepenny Upright,
  • Upright Man–An upright man signifies the chief or principal of a crew. The vilest, stoutest rogue in the pack is generally chosen to this post, and has the sole right to the first night’s lodging with the dells, who afterwards are used in common among the whole fraternity. He carries a short truncheon in his hand, which he calls his filchman, and has a larger share than ordinary in whatsoever is gotten in the society. He often travels in company with thirty or forty males and females, abram men, and others, over whom he presides arbitrarily. Sometimes the women and children who are unable to travel, or fatigued, are by turns carried in panniers by an ass, or two, or by some poor jades procured for that purpose.
  • Upstarts–Persons lately raised to honours and riches from mean stations.
  • Urchin–A child, a little fellow; also a hedgehog.
  • Urinal of the Planets–Ireland: so called from the frequent rains in that island.
  • Used Up–Killed: a military saying, originating from a message sent by the late General Guise, on the expedition at Carthagena, where he desired the commander in chief to order him some more grenadiers, for those he had were all used up.

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