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Giveaway

Our winner was Ambre who came up with “A Trifling Disguised.”

For those who would like to get the prize for themselves, it is on sale at Amazon and will be available all across the internet and at bookstores after November 15th.

TWO PEAS IN A POD

TwoPeasinaPod_DavidWilkin_Amazon.com_KindleStore-2012-09-7-09-42.jpg

TWO PEAS IN A POD

978-0-9829989-3-9

Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

Even though it is released in .mobi for the Kindle, I of course have the ability to send it to you in all formats for your eReaders and computers.

How to have won

But to enter the contest I should like some interaction.

1) One favorite word from the Lexicon which you can see each separate letter here in the Blog by looking at previous days postings, or go to the entire lexicon at the Regency Assembly Press website, here (Regency Lexicon)

2) (Optional) Your name of course (if you are registered and signed into WordPress then I can click back to you if you are the winner, but if you are not,) and an email or some way to get you the prize!

3) (Optional) And if you are super proactive, what eBook format you would need should you be our winner!

4) (Really Optional) Regular followers of my Blog will know about Jane Austen and Ghosts, one of our other novels. As Jane deals with old B Horror Movie legends in Jane Austen and Ghosts, we would like the name of a B movie legend (and please let us try not to repeat since it will be fun to see how many we can come up with. So to start off, I will give one as an example, Boris Karloff)

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Hard at work

Working on the additional entries for the 1802 Timeline

Also continuing to write on Crown in Jeopardy, part 3 of the Born to Grace Trilogy.

Editing continues for the 2 serialized novels, Steam and Thunder and The Prize is not as Great as you Think.

But want to remind all readers and call your attention to our giveaway. Enter in the comments sections by referencing something you like from the Regency Lexicon which can be found here in past issues of the blog, one letter at a time or all at once at Regency Lexicon.

Giveaway

My thought is to run this for a week and announce our winner next Monday, the 3rd. (Labor Day in the United States.)

This time around we are giving away an eBook of our newest release:

TWO PEAS IN A POD

TwoPeasinaPod_DavidWilkin_Amazon.com_KindleStore-2012-09-2-08-51.jpg

TWO PEAS IN A POD

978-0-9829989-3-9

Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

Even though it is released in .mobi for the Kindle, I of course have the ability to send it to you in all formats for your eReaders and computers.

How to win

But to enter the contest I should like some interaction.

1) One favorite word from the Lexicon which you can see each separate letter here in the Blog by looking at previous days postings, or go to the entire lexicon at the Regency Assembly Press website, here (Regency Lexicon)

2) (Optional) Your name of course (if you are registered and signed into WordPress then I can click back to you if you are the winner, but if you are not,) and an email or some way to get you the prize!

3) (Optional) And if you are super proactive, what eBook format you would need should you be our winner!

4) (Really Optional) Regular followers of my Blog will know about Jane Austen and Ghosts, one of our other novels. As Jane deals with old B Horror Movie legends in Jane Austen and Ghosts, we would like the name of a B movie legend (and please let us try not to repeat since it will be fun to see how many we can come up with. So to start off, I will give one as an example, Boris Karloff)

Read Full Post »

Giveaway

My thought is to run this for a week and announce our winner next Monday, the 3rd. (Labor Day in the United States.)

This time around we are giving away an eBook of our newest release:

TWO PEAS IN A POD

TwoPeasinaPod_DavidWilkin_Amazon.com_KindleStore-2012-08-28-09-20.jpg

TWO PEAS IN A POD

978-0-9829989-3-9

Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

Even though it is released in .mobi for the Kindle, I of course have the ability to send it to you in all formats for your eReaders and computers.

How to win

But to enter the contest I should like some interaction.

1) One favorite word from the Lexicon which you can see each separate letter here in the Blog by looking at previous days postings, or go to the entire lexicon at the Regency Assembly Press website, here (Regency Lexicon)

2) (Optional) Your name of course (if you are registered and signed into WordPress then I can click back to you if you are the winner, but if you are not,) and an email or some way to get you the prize!

3) (Optional) And if you are super proactive, what eBook format you would need should you be our winner!

4) (Really Optional) Regular followers of my Blog will know about Jane Austen and Ghosts, one of our other novels. As Jane deals with old B Horror Movie legends in Jane Austen and Ghosts, we would like the name of a B movie legend (and please let us try not to repeat since it will be fun to see how many we can come up with. So to start off, I will give one as an example, Boris Karloff)

Read Full Post »

As with the other timeline posts, there are so many graphics, and WordPress just doesn’t format tables very well, so I need to direct you to the website for this.

1801 however is now up with nearly 100 graphics.

TheRegencyEraTimeline-2012-08-27-08-00.jpg

Read Full Post »

Timeline

Each time I start a year, I have already compiled a list, months ago with about 6000 entered of what happened from 1788 to 1837. My first step now (It took several trials to get this down to a science) is to cut out the specific year I will work on and paste it into its own spreadsheet to work with. When I worked on the entire spreadsheet, sometimes inserting a line, with all the graphics I had begun to place, took a long time. Working on each year alone, is a lot faster.

With the year separated out, I now turn to my book sources,

The Timetables of History by Grun and Stein1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-11-08-27.jpg

Chronology of CULTURE by Paxton and Fairfield

1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-11-08-27.jpg What Happened When by Carruth.

PastedGraphic-2012-08-11-08-27.jpg, History of the World. A beautiful Dorling Kindersley book.

I now and diligently look through each of these to find entries that I did not come across on the internet, and other printed lists. It is possible that there are places that have more listings for each year. I have not found them. And when you go to the Timelines at the Regency Assembly Press page, there you will see all the graphical references as well. Something that I did not find anywhere else.

Here is the start of 1801:

Year Month Day Event
1801 Jan 1 Giuseppi Piazzi (d.1826), Italian astronomer, discovered an asteroid orbiting between Mars and Jupiter. He believed it to be a planet and named it Ceres (goddess of the harvest).
1801 Jan 11 Domenico Cimarosa (51), Italian composer (Matrimonio segreto), died.
1801 Jan 20 US Secretary of State John Marshall was nominated by President Adams to be chief justice. He was sworn in on Feb. 4, 1801. Marshall effectively created the legal framework within which free markets in goods and services could establish themselves.
1801 Jan 28 Francis Barber (ca. 1735 – 1801), the Jamaican manservant of Samuel Johnson (1752-1784), died at the Staffordshire General Infirmary.
1801 Jan Toussaint Louverture, ignoring the commands of Napoleon Bonaparte, overran Spanish Santo Domingo, where slavery persisted.
1801 January January: Emma Hamilton gives birth to the illegitimate daughter of Lord Nelson.
1801 January January: the Act of Union with Ireland creates the United Kingdom.
1801 Feb 4 John Marshall was sworn in as chief justice of the United States.
1801 Feb 7 John Rylands, merchant, philanthropist, was born in England.
1801 Feb 17 The House of Representatives broke an electoral tie between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr, electing Jefferson president. Burr became vice president. When George Washington announced that he would retire from office, he set the stage for the nation’s first two-party presidential campaign.
1801 Feb 17 Thomas Jefferson won the White House vowing to get rid of all federal taxes. He was supported by a new coalition of anti-Federalists that was the ancestor of the Democratic Party. In 2003 Jules Witcover authored “Party of the People: A History of the Democrats.”
1801 Feb 21 John Henry Newman, was born. He was the Protestant vicar who converted to Catholicism and became a Roman Catholic Cardinal. He authored “Dream of Gerontius.”
1801 Feb 27 The District of Columbia was placed under the jurisdiction of Congress.
1801 Feb 28 Motiejus Valancius, Lithuanian educator, historian, writer and bishop, was born in Nasrenai in the Kretinga region. He died May 29, 1875, in Kaunas. His portrait is on the 2-litas note.
1801 February February: The government of William Pitt collapses over the issue of Catholic emancipation. Pitt had made veiled promises of emancipation in order to secure the Act of Union, but George III would not support it, and Pitt resigned.
1801 February February: The Treaty of Lunéville, between France and the Holy Roman Empire, is signed, giving France control up to the Rhine and the French client republics in Italy and the Netherlands. Britian is now the sole nation fighting against France.
1801 14-Mar Prime Minister of Great Britain: Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth
1801 Mar 3 1st US Jewish Governor, David Emanuel, took office in Georgia.
1801 Mar 4 Thomas Jefferson became the first President to be inaugurated in Washington, D.C. (1801-1809). James Madison became secretary of state. In his inaugural address Jefferson said: “Though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will, to be rightful, must be reasonable; the minority possesses their equal right, which equal laws must protect, and to violate would be oppression.”
1801 Mar 10 Britain conducted its first census in order to find out how many men were available for conscription.
1801 Mar 11 Paul I (46), Czar of Russia (1796-1801), was strangled in his bedroom in St. Petersburg ending 4 years of insane rule. His son Alexander I Pavlovich (23) succeeded him.
1801 Mar 14 Christian Friedrich Penzel (63), composer, died.
1801 Mar 21 Andrea Lucchesi (59), composer, died.
1801 Mar 24 Aleksandr P. Romanov became emperor of Russia.
1801 Mar 25 Anthony Ziesenis (69), architect, sculptor (Camper), died.
1801 March March: England conducts its first census.
1801 March March: Henry Addington becomes Prime Minister.
1801 March March: The London Stock Exchange is founded.
1801 March March: Thomas Jefferson becomes the third President of the United States.
1801 March March: Tsar Paul I of Russia is assassinated. He is succedded by Tsar Alexander I.
1801 Apr 2 The British navy defeated the Danish at the Battle of Copenhagen.
1801 Apr 8 Soldiers rioted in Bucharest and killed 128 Jews.
1801 Apr 11 Johann von Schiller’s “Die Jungfrau von Orleans (The Maid of Orleans),” premieres in Leipzig.
1801 Apr 12 Josef Franz Karl Lanner, Austrian composer, violist, was born.
1801 Apr 21 Saudi Arabs led Sunni raids into Karbala, Iraq, killing about 5,000 people.
1801 Apr 24 The 1st performance of Joseph Haydn’s oratorio “Die Jahreszeiten (The Seasons).”
1801 Apr 28 Anthony Ashley-Cooper, the seventh Earl of Shaftesbury and a leading social reformer of the Victorian Age, was born in England. Shaftesbury labored to establish schools, to abolish the use of small children as chimney sweeps, and to wipe out child prostitution. He was a vocal opponent of slavery but had little respect for the United States’ President Abraham Lincoln and thought the South should be permitted to secede from the Union.
1801 April April: At the Battle of Copenhagen, Lord Nelson deals a death blow to the League of Armed Neutrality (Russia, Denmark, Sweden, and Prussia) with his destruction of the Danish fleet. When he returns to England in June, he is elevated to a viscount.
1801 April April: The U.S. Library of Congress is founded.
1801 May 6 British Lt. Thomas Cochrane, commander of the 14-gun sloop HMS Speedy, engaged and captured the 32-gun Spanish frigate El Gamo. The climactic battle in Patrick O’Brian’s novel “Master and Commander” is based on the Speedy’s fight with El Gamo. Cochrane was later elected to Parliament, pointed out corruption and was arrested on trumped up charges. After that he served as the first commander of Chile’s navy, then Brazil’s navy and the Greek navy before returning to England. In 2000 Robert Harvey authored “Cochrane: The Life and Exploits of a Fighting Captain.”
1801 May 14 The Pasha of Tripoli symbolically declared war on the US by cutting down the glagstaff in front of the US Consulate, after learning that Pres. Jefferson had refused to pay a renewed tribute of $225,000.
1801 May 16 William Henry Seward was born. He was later Gov. of New York and the American Sec. of State from 1861-1869. Under Pres. Lincoln he purchased Alaska for the United States at 2 cents per acre.
1801 Jun 1 Mormon leader Brigham Young (d.1877), the second president of the Mormon Church, was born in Whitingham, Vt.
1801 Jun 10 The North African state of Tripoli declared war on the United States in a dispute over safe passage of merchant vessels through the Mediterranean. Tripoli declared war on the U.S. for refusing to pay tribute.
1801 Jun 14 Former American Revolutionary War General Benedict Arnold died in London.
1801 Jun 29 Frederic Bastiat (d.1850), French free-market economist, was born in Bayonne. “The state is the great fictitious entity in which everyone seeks to live at the expense of everyone else.”
1801 June June: Cairo falls to British troops.
1801 Jul 3 Johann Nepomuk Went (56), composer, died.
1801 Jul 5 David G. Farragut (d.1870), American naval hero, was born in Knoxville, Tenn.
1801 Jul 7 A new constitution, drafted by a committee appointed by Toussaint Louverture (L’Ouverture), went into effect and declared the independence of Hispaniola. The constitution made him governor general for life with near absolute powers.
1801 Jul 16 Pope Pius VII and 1st consul Napoleon signed a concord.
1801 Jul 17 The U.S. fleet arrived in Tripoli after Pasha Yusuf Karamanli declared war for being refused tribute.
1801 Aug 1 The American schooner Enterprise captured the Barbary cruiser Tripoli.
1801 Aug 6 A 9-day revival began at the Cane Ridge Presbyterian Church in Bourbon County, Kentucky. Some 20,000 people showed up for the revival called by Rev. Barton W. Stone. 3 evangelistic Christian groups grew out of the meeting.
1801 August August: The West India Docks open after a two-year design and construction project by William Jessop. Built on the Isle of Dogs, they are the first large wet docks built in the Port of London, and can accommodate 600 ships.
1801 Oct 6 Napoleon Bonaparte imposed a new constitution on Holland.
1801 Oct 23 Gustav Albert Lortzing, composer, was born.
1801 Oct 23 Johann Gottlieb Naumann (60), German composer, died.
1801 October October: The Treaty of London is signed, a preliminary peace treaty ending the war between France and Britain.
1801 Nov 3 Karl Baedeker (d.1859), German publisher, was born. He became well known for travel guides. His 1835 “Travel on the Rhine” is widely considered as the 1st modern guidebook.
1801 Nov 3 Vincenzo Bellini, Italian opera composer (La Sonnambula, Norma), was born.
1801 Nov 9 Carl Philipp Stamitz, composer, died.
1801 Nov 9 Gail Borden (d.1874), inventor of condensed milk, was born in New York.
1801 Nov 10 Samuel Gridley Howe (d.1876), educator of the blind, was born. He was the husband of Julia Ward Howe, author of the “Battle Hymn of the Republic.”
1801 Nov 10 Kentucky banned dueling.
1801 Nov 16 The 1st edition of New York Evening Post was published. Alexander Hamilton helped found the paper and served as editor.
1801 Dec 24 Richard Trevithick, inventor of the steam locomotive, completed a road test of his 1st “traveling engine” in Camborne, England.
1801 December December: Richard Trevithick builds and demonstrates the first steam-powered road locomotive.
1801 Another Act of Union joins the Kingdom of Ireland to England and Scotland, and the Union Flag sees the addition of the diagonal red cross.
1801 Architects Charles Percier and Pierre-François-Léonard Fontaine publish the Recueil de décorations intérieures, a compilation of drawings of contemporary design that will set the standard for the Empire style of interior decoration that spreads throughout Europe.
1801 Beethoven completes the “Moonlight Sonata” (Piano Sonata No. 14 in C-sharp minor, Opus 27).
1801 English horse racing at Goodwood is introduced by Charles Lennox, Duke of Richmond.
1801 Lord Elgin, with permission of the Turkish government that controls Athens, begins the removal of sculptured portions of the Parthenon, a task that takes five years to complete.
1801 Maria Edgeworth’s Belinda is publlished.
1801 The first census is held.
1801 The Union Jack becomes the new flag of the United Kingdom in 1801, incorporating the Cross of St. George (England), the Cross of St. Andrew (Scotland), and the Cross of St. Patrick (Ireland).
1801 Robert Trevithick demonstrates a steam locomotive.
1801 Britain is rising as an industrial power. The average life expectancy is around 40. A fictional “better-off” family will be described as drinking water that has a cow taste because it is taken from a brook from which cows drink. Meat is rare. Dental care is poor. The family eats with wooden spoons. Candles are rarely used because they cost too much. The father “visited the city once, but the travel cost him a week’s wages… The children sleep two to a bed on straw mattresses on the floor.”
1801 Britain makes Ireland part of a single British kingdom. Parliament in Dublin is abolished. The Anglican Church is to be recognized as the official church in Ireland. No Catholics are to be allowed to hold public office.
1801 Napoleon of France has defeated Austria. In the treaty of Lunéville, Austria renounces claims to the Holy Roman Empire.
1801 Rembrandt Peale painted his brother’s portrait: “Rubens Peale with Geranium.”
1801 Francois Rene de Chateaubriand (1768-1848), French writer, authored his novel “Atala” following a trip to the US.
1801 Samuel Taylor Coleridge, English poet, wrote to Sir Humphrey Davy a letter in which he says: “I seem to sink in upon myself in a ruin, like a Column of Sand, informed and animated only by a Whirl-Blast of the Dessert.” Coleridge had become addicted to opium in this year.
1801 Beethoven composed Op. 25 Serenade for flute, Violin and Viola.
1801 Thomas Bruce, the 7th Earl of Elgin, took the 2,500 year-old bas-reliefs from the Parthenon while he served as the British ambassador to the Ottoman Empire. 17 figures and 56 panels were put on display at the British Museum in 1816. Around 1939 the marbles were subjected to a botched scouring operation that damaged 40% of the collection. Elgin had hired Giovanni Lusieri, an Italian artist from the court of the King of Naples, to oversee the Parthenon project.
1801 Thomas Jefferson began a set of proper rules for the Senate when he wrote: ” No one is to disturb another in his speech by hissing, coughing, spitting, speaking, or whispering to another.”
1801 Elder John Leland, a Baptist minister, helped commission a 1,235-pound wheel of Cheshire cheese as a gift of gratitude for Thomas Jefferson’s steadfast support of religious liberties.
1801 The London Stock Exchange formed. British government debt was the only security traded and this remained so until 1822.
1801 French artist Girodet depicted Ossian, the mythical 3rd century blind Scottish poet, before the story was exposed as a fraud.
1801 In France Napoleon opened the Louvre to the public.
1801 Napoleon’s army in Egypt surrendered to Turkish and English forces. The French civilian toll topped 25 of 150, while the military toll topped 25,000 over the 3-year expedition.
1801 Friedrich von Hardenberg (b.1772), German poet (Novalis), died. He was later known as the father of German romantic nationalism.
1801 In Mexico La Iglesia de Nuestra Senora del Refugio was a Franciscan-style mission church built in the border town of Guerrero Viejo.
1801 South Ossetia was absorbed into the Russian Empire along with Georgia.
1801-1806 Alexandre Dumas (d.1870) covered these years of French history in an 1869 serialized novel printed in the journal, “The Universal Monitor.” In the 1980s Claude Schopp, a retired French lecturer, discovered the epic novel on microfilm. He got it published under the title “Le Chevalier de Sainte-Hermine,” and in 2005 it became a top ten seller.
1801-1835 John Marshall (1755-1835) was chief justice of the US Supreme Court. In 1996 Charles F. Hobson wrote “The Great Chief Justice: John Marshall and the Law” and Jean Edward Smith wrote “John Marshall: Definer of a Nation.”
1801-1848 Thomas Cole, English born US painter. He and Asher B. Durand became fathers of the Hudson River School of painting and founded the National Academy of Design.
1801-1864 Caroline Matilda Stansbury Kirkland, American author: “Like other spurious things, fastidiousness is often inconsistent with itself, the coarsest things are done, and the cruelest things said by the most fastidious people.”
1801-1866 Jane Welsh Carlyle, English writer: “In spite of the honestest efforts to annihilate my ‘I-ity,’ or merge it in what the world doubtless considers my better half (historian Thomas Carlyle), I still find myself a self-subsisting and alas! self-seeking ME.”
1801-1921 A single Parliament legislated all the British Isles. A history of the archipelago was written in 2000 by Norman Davies: “The Isles.”

2 Peas in a Pod Excerpt

I continue with more of Chapter One for the new book to be released in the next few weeks: Two Peas in a Pod PastedGraphic1-2012-08-11-08-27.jpg.

Two brothers that were so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of the Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

thumb-2012-08-11-08-27.jpg

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart too.

Chapter 1 Continued

Finally out of his camp seat, Percival checked to make sure he had his own coat on. They had once been playing their little trick on the Countess, their mother while growing up and made the mistake of not checking. It had gone terribly wrong after that. Raising the tent flap, he called for a runner, and then sent the man to fetch a doctor. After such a day, though, there were not many available. Peregrine, had to take his poorly bandaged self to a doctor. Where he was turned over to an assistant to have his wound cleaned, sewn, and bandaged.

Percival went to attend his own men, something that Peregrine had been urging, Not only as a brother giving advice, but as a superior officer telling his subordinate what to do. Percival often chose to ignore orders from Peregrine, when he thought that he could. He was the elder, and the Earl.

Peregrine had been reminded of that enough when little things stood between them. Percival had not thought to play that particular card when it was something of importance. Not as yet. Peregrine had no illusions that one day his brother would go too far and make an issue of his titled rank. That would be a bad day for the brothers. They may not have been dissimilar in appearance, but they certainly were most dissimilar in spirit.

Wellington, some few days later had summoned Peregrine to his quarters, once they had moved the force back to somewhere quieter. Battlefields were no place to have encampments. Peregrine knew that Napoleon had once again been thrown from power and was even then having his disposition decided. Probably not back to Elba. He had been apprehended, or had turned himself over. News was not exact in the army. “Recovered well?” Wellington asked. Peregrine had to have the arm in a sling for a week. Colonel Askew was all concerned how he had gotten wounded, when during the fighting he did not remember his second coming under attack.

“Yes, sir. Thank you.”

“Good. I will not mince words with you. I should desire that you refrain from this game of yours in my presence in future. You are more valuable to me then as a commander of a company. Askew goes home and you will be Colonel for the nonce until you return. I have many company commanders and if your brother needed a moment to find such courage, give him a swift kick next time. I do not have enough men to command my battalions and regiments. I will say, though, that when I need something done, I but yell for Coldwell and have more than I needed done, even if I do not know which one you are.” The Duke smiled.

“Sorry sir. I won’t let it happen again,” Peregrine said.

“I expect you will. I will talk to the Earl also, for what you do with others mostly does not concern me. I do not expect we shall have another fight. But it is time to put such actions aside, don’t you think?” Peregrine nodded. He did, but Percival would have been an ill choice to lead the troops that day. Even though he had done well on others.

“Yes sir. I agree. If Napoleon is truly caught, won’t we all be going home soon?”

A forced laugh came out, “I had thought that the fighting was done once before. We shall see. If we do go home, what of you? Are you planning to remain a soldier?”

Peregrine said, “I think I will resign my commission, sir. I have had much of soldiering, and think I should do better elsewhere.”

“Yes, you are the one who did graduate University, and your brother will be happy, no doubt, to sit in Lords and sleep the day away.”

Peregrine smiled in response to the Duke’s observation. Wellington was being funny with a small amount of truth to it. “I expect you are correct, your grace.”

“Out of here. Call me that in London, but not in my camp.” The Duke look irritated but he dismissed Peregrine readily enough. Peregrine really had not thought about the future beyond thanking the creator that the war was over. That it had seemed over. He did not like the chance of dying, nor of killing over much. No, he was not fond of that part of it all. He did like living after the battle. And Peregrine knew that directing where men should be was a skill he had. But it was a skill no man should excel at. Being a very good butcher of other men was not something to be very proud of.

* * *

Percival thought that London hadn’t changed. He had left the army ahead of Peregrine and the carriage was taking him to Coldwell House, the home he now owned on Bedford Square. He would stay in Town for a few weeks before he left for the country and see to the estate.

That was a euphemism for him that meant to do nothing. He had a man of business that saw to such things. He had a factor that ran the estate, and had done so while he was off fighting. The manor in Chartham, Kent Park, was the largest for miles around, and close enough to Canterbury that there was some civilization nearby. One long day of travel from Town, or two should he want to make his way at a leisurely pace. He was going to choose the latter. He looked forward to seeing the estate and doing nothing. A great deal of nothing. He would have to put up with his sister Penelope, but she was so young, that she would not be a bother.

Percival shook his head even as the arrived in Bedford Square. Penelope was supposed to be of an age and leave the schoolroom that season. He was sure Peregrine had mentioned it. Perry had a head for such twaddle. She could not be a woman grown. Percival distinctly remembered her as a spindly little child. It had been four years since they had seen one another, but surely she would not have grown overmuch.

Four years ago he was the same size, in height at least. He might have gained a stone or near two, since then. The fourth Company’s mess never lacked for good victuals. Well sometimes it did, but when well supplied, they had the best of many things that other companies and regiments did not. He was a Grenadier Guard Captain. He had to maintain a certain level of style, also as Earl people expected him to be of a certain status. Percival was sure that even Wellington was envious of the table that he could lay.

Upstart India robber was new come to his wealth and so didn’t appreciate the finer things. He would, but Percival was the ninth Earl and had a certain level of decorum to maintain. Arriving at the house, he found the butler awaiting him. The man and the entire staff, though many were new as the house had only a caretaker while he was on the continent. “Ah, Williams, everything seen to? You were able to come and put all to rights?”

“Yes my lord. We have been able to hire all the staff that Coldwell House requires per your instructions…”

“Hmm, do you still have those. Perry wrote them and I just glanced at them, having so much to do to prepare to leave France when I was told I could leave. I suppose it would be well if I reviewed them fully. Cook…” Percival said quickly. “Did you bring Cook with you. I should like something familiar to eat. Or is Cook at Kent Park? No I am sure I told Perry to instruct you to bring Cook with you.”

Williams said, “Yes my lord. Cook is here and when we received your note that you should arrive today, she began preparing many of your favorites. Master Peregrine also suggested we hire a chef just for London, and that they train with Cook so that they would learn your favorites. I have done so and hope you shall approve of my decisions…”

Percival waved his hand, “Of course, of course I trust you implicitly man. Why you know more about running our houses then I do, now best you let me meet the staff, what, you have them assembled, already?” Percival said as he walked into the foyer and saw them all there. “You see, you know more than I…”

Percival saw a mix of servants that he knew and some who must have been new. Two maids, he had never seen before and they were just the right age for flirtation and sport should he be so inclined. He smiled to himself at that thought. There had been any number of opportunities in Portugal, Spain and France for that sort of activity, but now that he was in London, unless he wanted a barque of frailty, he would have to go to one of the houses, or find some other doxie. There were not going to be any women of quality crossing his path for such fun.

He remembered that he had been very cozy with two women at Kent Park. Briefly he wondered what had become of them since he had gone to fight. Peregrine never would have done something like that with the servants, not that it had stopped the man from pursuing the ladies of quality that had shadowed the army. Peregrine seemed to always have some woman eating out of his hand. But he did not seem to bed those willing to jump in and spend a night relieving their tensions and enjoying one’s company. His younger brother was a fool, all too often. Percival was sure of that.

Percival found that Cook was indeed in true form and after a very sumptuous meal, he was ready to retire. It had lulled him as well as the day’s travel. In any case, he had no reason to stay up late. Nor rise early. He was perfectly able and meant to enjoy the luxury of sleep. Seeing how fetching the maids were, he wondered if he should try and have one join him that night, but his own lassitude prevented that. Besides he had a fortnight, he thought, to pursue that interest.

The following day, rising as late as he thought he could get away with it, Percival composed letters and then took his card to the few places he knew that he must call. Some he sent the boy, damned if he could remember the boys name, but there was always a boy about to run errands. One thing he had to do, was assure himself that Dorset was not in town. Percival did not relish encountering his sister, and as it was not yet the Season, it was highly possible that she was not. Priscilla, especially married and a Marchioness, would be a stickler for the rules of society.

As Dorset had a very nice country estate, she should be there. Percival shivered with the thought of a reunion with his elder sister. She was so pushy. Not at all like sweet Penelope. A young biddable girl, woman, now. Well they would be reunited shortly. Other matters he was concerned with was his taking leave from the regiment, which would be permanent. The army would no longer need so many Captains, and certainly not an Earl who had done his bit. No, Horse Guards was going to see him ride off into the night, never to be heard from again. He would of course sell his commission. Why let that money go to waste. He vaguely wondered, now that the war was over, what kind of man would want to buy it. Would it be a fire eater, or some young lieutenant wanting to move up?

He returned to Coldwell House and found that no letters had been returned yet, and no cards showing that anyone knew he was home. He could not blame any friends from society, though few would be in town. They, as his sister, would all be at the ends of the country, enjoying the last of fall before winter came. Before they flocked back to Town.

Another day thus came to an end, but now he had his rest and could start approximating Town hours. He was able to stay up till the clock struck two, catching a glimpse of one of the maids on the backstairs in her night gown with dressing coat over it. Yes, there was a flirtation there. One that led to the rest of the night being full of just the best type of exercises.

Notes on Editing

Not to say I don’t like editing, but I don’t like editing. It takes a lot of hours and it interrupts what I was thinking of creatively on the new work. It is also the place I am right now. Using Thesauri, (more than one) the OED which if you are a writer, and write in English (any form of English) you do need. Forget anyone’s else’s dictionary like Webster’s. You need an OED.

So I sit with my manuscript printed out and go page by page, line by line and make corrections. Think about words. Decide if I need a new paragraph. I have a few things I keep developing in the process PP-new paragraph, SP-check spelling, TH-check for a different word choice, OED-check to see if the word is historically accurate.

I did this in 9 point type, two columns to a page to give me a book life feel and save on paper. That didn’t work so now I am trying printed out with 1 inch margins, double spacing and 14 or 16 point type so my eyes don’t blur too much. I am getting old and will need bifocals soon I think.

Notes on LendInk, and the free lending of eBooks

I have another friend who found on Facebook that some one in Canada was giving out her books for free. That just does not seem right and with a great deal of effort, Facebook took the site down. Facebook is slow to admit that their system allows the creating of illegal and bogus material of any sort, since of course all you have to do is click a few buttons and type what you want about anything.

I hope all my readers know that I am selling the Brooklyn Bridge for $1400 dollars US if you send it to my Paypal account here…

But seriously, the question of copyright comes up. And then there is LendInk which may have started as a good idea, but it is a corruptible idea surely through no fault of the founder, but of many of the users. The last few days I have seen posts by relatively intelligent writers who have of course, no skin in the game, saying that it is a travesty that LendInk has been put to bed.

That is not so, and I will explain me (Like Ricky in I Love Lucy)

In the days when a book was a book. You may remember it, it was not but a very few years ago. You would pay your $7.99 or whatever and read the book. You had one copy, and then you would have a friend, someone you knew, someone you had talked to more than once for 3.87 seconds. And so you knew what books they might like as well.

Well, you being done with a book, you would offer to lend them a book, or even, should you be rich enough in soul and pocket, give them the book.

I think all authors (and I know I take on a lot when I include all authors) are quite fine with such a model. Then we have LendInk (and other sharing services. I name LendInk since there is a great deal of Internet bits and bytes about it right now), and while the concept may seem alright, I think again most authors have a problem with it. (See I switched things there a little) And that is what LendInk does/did.

They used the idea that we authors had given our okay to lend out the eBooks because, well Amazon made it a condition of offering the book at a reasonable price to readers. So we really had NO CHOICE. Did I say that loud enough for all involved in the controversy. Let me say it again. AMAZON GAVE US NO CHOICE if we were to sell a book to you so that a reader could afford it. Want to sell a book for below $10.00 then you have to allow it to be leant for free.

But then we all believe that you still can lend one of our books that you purchase to your friends. Your friends. People you know for more than 3.87 seconds. People who are really your friends and not those who follow you on Twitter, or friended you meaninglessly on Facebook just to make your little circle bigger.

Quibbling over the definition of friend in the “Social Network” age is meaningless for just as people do know what is good and what is not good, readers will know what a friend is.

So that means that we authors (most of us) encourage you to buy our books and then when you have fallen in love with our wordcraft, and are gushing to your friends and meet up with them, go ahead and lend out the book to your friend. Touch Kindles and transfer the eBook. Giving away a book to someone on a website you never met before so you can get a book from someone else you do not know, is not the lending analogy we agreed too with Amazon.

So an anonymous site where you let people you have never met know that you bought 5 books for your Kindle and thus can now lend them. You can then borrow from people you have never met, 5 books that you do not have to pay for, and that the author who spent hundreds of hours writing will not get paid for. That is the fallacy of LendInk and similar services. It takes the lending to a friend out of lending and does indeed make this as piracy. A reader only has to have 1 book purchased and then they can put that up to lend and borrow again without ever buying another book.

Is that fair? Whatever business you are in, is that fair? Would these bloggers, presumably being paid through advertising on their blogs like it if the advertisers got together and compared notes and said, that since they placed one ad, they now had the right to swap their ad from site A to the bloggers site, with the person who had bought ads on the bloggers site, and then never pay again? Of course not. But the bloggers who are defending the now defunct site don’t care if a writer gets no money and won’t be able to eat. The blogger will get money and be able to eat and eat more since they can get free reading material at pirating sites. LendInk may not have started out that way, but it is easily abused that way.

But lest you think I am heartless and should deny you reading literature, even great literature, for if the free bottom feeders can’t even afford $.99 for a great many books, they can often get books for free each and every day around the net that authors are giving away. But there is Project Gutenberg that had scores of volunteers who typed word by word the original manuscripts of out of copyright MASTERPIECES and CLASSICS. They have so many books available for free, that a newborn living to a hundred would die before finishing that FREE library.

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As with the other timeline posts, there are so many graphics, and WordPress just doesn’t format tables very well, so I need to direct you to the website for this.

1800 however is now up with nearly 100 graphics.

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Now that the Lexicon is finished for a time, I am back at work on the Timelines, which you can find house

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And should you think that I have gone silent, such is not the case. I have now all of the entires for 1800 finished. I am in the process of adding graphics from my research and the internet. So for now I am giving you a glimpse of this:

Year Month Day Event
1800 Jan 7 Millard Fillmore, 13th US president (1850-1853), was born in Summerhill (Locke), N.Y.

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1800 Jan 8 Victor of Aveyron (~1785-1828), a feral child, emerged from French forests on his own. In 1797 he had been found wandering the woods near Saint-Sernin-sur-Rance, France, and was captured, but soon escaped. He was later  portrayed in the 1969 movie, The Wild Child (L’Enfant sauvage), by François Truffaut.

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1800 Jan 10 The US Senate ratified a peace treaty with Tunis.
1800 Jan 20 Carolina, the sister of Napoleon I, married King Joachim Murat of Naples.
1800 Jan 23 Edward Rutledge (50), US attorney (signed Declaration of Independence), died.
1800 Jan 24 Edwin Chadwick, British social reformer, was born.
1800 Jan 30 US population was reported at 5,308,483; Black population 1,002,037 (18.9%).
1800 Jan Pierre Samuel du Pont de Nemours, his two sons and their families, arrived in Newport, Rhode Island, from France.
1800 Jan Lord Elgin established his British embassy in Constantinople. His orders were to open the borders for trade, obtain entry for British ships to the Black Sea and to secure an alliance against French military expeditions in the eastern Mediterranean.
1800 Feb 11 William Henry Fox Talbot (d.1877), British inventor and pioneer in instantaneous photography, was born.
1800 Mar 14 James Bogardus, US inventor, builder (made cast-iron buildings), was born.
1800 Mar 17 English warship Queen Charlotte caught fire and 700 people died.
1800 Mar 20 French army defeated Turks at Heliopolis, Turkey, and advanced to Cairo.
1800 Apr 2 1st performance of Ludwig van Beethoven’s 1st Symphony in C.
1800 Apr 15 Sir James Clark Ross, Scottish explorer, was born. He located the Magnetic North Pole.
1800 Apr 16 George Charles Bingham, British soldier, was born. He commanded the Light Brigade during its famous charge.
1800 Apr 24 US Congress approved a bill establishing the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. with a $5,000 allocation.
1800 April April: Beethoven premiers his Symphony No. 1 in C major in Vienna.
1800 April April: English poet William Cowper dies at age 68 .
1800 May 5 Louis Hachette, French publisher (Librairie Hachette), was born.
1800 May 7 US Congress divided the Northwest Territory into two parts, and Indiana, the latter out of the western portion, including Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana and parts of Michigan and Minnesota. The provisions of the Treaty of Paris (1783) which ended the Revolutionary War, had defined the borders of the US. Among other concessions, Great Britain agreed to a line through the Great Lakes that placed in US control the territory called the Old Northwest, between the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. States that had previously laid claim to parts of the region ceded their territories in anticipation of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787.
1800 May 7 Niccolo  Piccinni (72), Italian composer (Roland), died in Paris. Gluck’s rival
1800 May 9 John Brown, American abolitionist, was born. His adventures came to an end at Harper’s Ferry, where he tried to start a revolution against slavery.
1800 May 14 Friedrich von Schiller’s “Macbeth,” premiered in Weimar
1800 May 15 King George III survived a 2nd assassination attempt.
1800 May 19 French Bosbeeck, veterinarian, robber, was hanged.
1800 May May: “The Masquerade given at the King’s Theatre, on the 1st instant, was numerously attended. Among the several characters, a Quack Doctor was most conspicuous – a Sylvester Daggerwood who had an infinite deal of nothing to say — Sailors, Countrymen, Chimney Sweepers, Flower Girls, Gipsies, a Tommy Tonsor, a band of Mrs. Montagu’s friends, a Rolla, who tore his fine speeches, full of logic and grammar, and a great number of Harlequins and Clowns, the former sans agility, the latter sans humor, filled up the scene. The supper was the best by far that has of late been given upon such an occasion, and the company was truly respectable. We cannot conclude this brief account without expressing our disapprobation of the indecent custom of men habiting themselves like women. The conduct of some persons of this description, during the evening, disgusted the greater part of the assembly; but at length some gentlemen, much to their credit, actually compelled them to retire from the merry scene.”- The Sporting Magazine
1800 May May: An assassination attempt is made on George III at Drury Lane Theatre.
1800 May May: Napoleon crosses the Alps and invades Italy.
1800 May-Dec US presidential elections were held over this period. On Dec 3 state electors met and cast their ballots and a tie resulted between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr.
1800 Jun 4 The US White House was completed and President & Mrs. John Adams moved in. [see Nov 1]
1800 Jun 14 French General Napoleon Bonaparte pushed the forces of Austria out of Italy in the Battle of Marengo. In 2007 the sword he wore was auctioned off for over $6.4 million.
1800 Jun 14 Jean-Baptiste Kleber (47), French general, architect, was murdered.
1800 June June: Napoleon drives the Austrians from Italy (which they had conquered while he was busy in Egypt) in the Battle of Marengo.
1800 June The new city of Washington in the District of Columbia became the US capital, succeeding Philadelphia. This occurred when government departments began to move into their new buildings on land ceded to the federal government by Maryland and Virginia. The radial design of the city was created by the French architect Pierre Charles L’Enfant. Construction had begun in 1791 but was delayed following L’Enfant’s dismissal in 1792. The first Congress to sit in Washington convened on Nov. 17, 1800. The first president to live in the executive mansion, John Adams moved in also in November. The first president to be inaugurated there, Thomas Jefferson was sworn into office March 4 1801. The US was the first modern nation to design a city exclusively as a capital. Free inhabitants 2,464, slaves 623.
1800 Jul 6 The Sultan of Constantinople at the behest of Lord Elgin issued written orders to his officers in Athens for cooperation with Giovanni Lusieri and the removal of sculptures from the Parthenon.
1800 Jul 8 Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse gave the 1st cowpox vaccination to his son to prevent smallpox. [see May 14, 1796]
1800 Aug 21 The US Marine Band gave its first concert near the future site of the Lincoln Memorial.
1800 Sep 6 Catherine Esther Beecher, educator who promoted higher education for women, was born in East Hampton, Long Island, NY.
1800 Sep 7 The NYC Zion AME Church was dedicated.
1800 Sep 23 William Holmes McGuffey, educator, was born. He is famous for his book “Eclectic Readers” (McGuffey Readers).
1800 September September: At the invitation of the Maltese, British troops liberate the Islands of Malta and Gozo from the French.
1800 September Cayuga Bridge, an engineering marvel of its time, was completed. It crossed the northern end of Cayuga Lake and the Montezuma Swamp in west central New York. The bridge, one and one-eighth of a mile long, was built of wood and was wide enough for wagons to pass abreast. Stages of the Genesee Turnpike used it, as did American troops in the War of 1812 on their way to the Niagara frontier. The bridge cot $150,000. It was financed by a loan from the Manhattan Company of New York City, which was founded in 1799 by Aaron Burr. Ostensibly established as a water supply company, the Manhattan Company had a charter broad enough so that it could function as a bank.
1800 Oct 1 Spain ceded Louisiana to France in a secret treaty.
1800 Oct 2 Nat Turner, slave and the property of Benjamin Turner, was born in Southampton county, Va. He was sold in 1831 to Joseph Travis from Jerusalem, Southampton county, Va.
1800 Oct 3 George Bancroft, historian, known as the “Father of American History” for his 10-volume A History of the United States, was born.
1800 Oct 7 Gabriel, slave revolt leader in Virginia, was hanged. Gabriel Prosser had mounted a slave rebellion.
1800 Oct 25 Thomas Babington Macaulay (d.1859), England, poet and historian, was born. “No particular man is necessary to the state. We may depend on it that, if we provide the country with popular institutions, those institutions will provide it with great men.”
1800 Oct 26 Helmuth Karl von Moltke, Prussian Field Marshal and Count, was born. His reorganization of the Prussian Army led to military victories that allowed the unification of Germany. His father was a German officer serving in the Danish army. His greatest innovation was the creation of a fighting force that could mobilize quickly and strike when and where it chose. He was one of the first generals to grasp the importance of railroads in moving troops. In 1995 Otto Friedrich authored a biography of the Moltke family line from Bismarck to Hitler: “Blood and Iron: From Bismarck to Hitler the von Moltke Family’s Impact on German History.”
1800 Nov 1 John and Abigail Adams moved into “the President’s House” in Washington DC. It became known as the White House during the Roosevelt administration.
1800 Nov 17 The Sixth Congress (2nd session) convened for the first time in Washington, DC, in the partially completed Capitol building. Previously, the federal capital had briefly been in  other cities, including New York, Philadelphia, and Annapolis, Maryland. George Washington- a surveyor by profession- had been assigned to find a site for a capital city somewhere along the upper Potomac River, which flows between Maryland and Virginia. Apparently expecting to become president, Washington sited the capital at the southernmost possible point, the closest commute from Mount Vernon, despite the fact that this placed the city in a swamp called Foggy Bottom.
1800 Nov 24 Carl Maria Ernst von Weber’s (1786-1826) opera “Das Waldmadchen,” was written in Freiburg.
1800 Dec 2 John Brown (d.1859), US abolitionist, was born. He was hanged for murder in the Harper’s Ferry Incident in 1859. John Brown led the raid on the Federal Arsenal at Harper’s Ferry. The incident is the backdrop for George MacDonald Fraser’s novel “Flashman and the Angel of the Lord.”
1800 Dec 3 Austrians were defeated by the French at the Battle of Hohenlinden, near Munich.
1800 Dec 3 US state electors met and cast their ballots for the presidency. A tie resulted between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr.
1800 Dec 12 Washington DC was established as the capital of US.
1800 Dec 29 Charles Goodyear (d.1860), inventor of vulcanized rubber for tires, was born.
1800 Dec In Virginia Martha Washington set all her slaves free.
1800 December December: Peace negotiations between France and Austria break down, and Napoleon sends General Moreau into Austria, where he is victorious at the Battle of Hohenlinden.
1800 December December: Washington, DC is officially established as the capital of the United States.
1800 A new edition of Lyrical Ballads is published, with a Preface by William Wordsworth (expanded in the 1802 edition) that stands as a Romantic manifesto on the nature of poetry.
1800 Jacques Louis David paints his famous Portrait of Mme. Récamier.
1800 London’s Royal College of Surgeons is founded.
1800 Maria Edgeworth’s Castle Rackrent is published.
1800 In a secret treaty with Spain, the Treaty of San Ildefonso, France regains Louisiana. 
1800 England’s population, around 5.25 million in 1720, has increased to around 9 million. World population has risen from between 600 and 680 million in 1700 to one billion, roughly calculated. The most populous cities in 1800 are: Guangzhou, China: 1.5 million.
Hangchow, China: 1,000,000
Kingtehchen, China: 1,000,000 
NanJing, China: 1,000,000
Edo (Tokyo), Japan 1,000,000 
London, England: 865,000
Beijing, China: 700,000
Constantinople (Istanbul), Turkey: 598,000
Paris, France: 548,000
Kyoto, Japan:530,000
1800 Mexico City has a population of 250,000. New York City: 60,000. Population remains sparse in areas occupied by hunter-gatherers — in Africa and the plains of North America. Areas occupied by pastoral nomads are also sparse.
1800 In the US presidential elections Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr tied in electoral votes. The selection was then moved to the House of Representatives where on the 36th ballot Vermont and Maryland switch their votes to Jefferson. [see Feb 17, 1801]
1800 France Presern (d.1849), author, painter, poet, musician, mathematician and architect, was born in Slovenia. His image was later featured on Slovenia’s 1,000-tolar bills.
1800 Johann Christian Reinhart, German artist, created his work: “The History Painter, Caricature.”
1800 Friedrich Schiller wrote his drama “Mary Stuart.” The play is compressed into the last 3 days of Mary’s life.
1800 Rev. Mason L. Weems (d.1825) authored the biography “Life of Washington.”
1800 Father Demetrius Gallitzin (1770-1840), a Russian-born Catholic priest, was directed by bishop John Carroll to investigate spirits in the home (Wizard’s Clip) of Adam Livingstone in the Shenandoah Valley.
1800 Congress allocated a room in the Capitol for the US Supreme Court.
1800 The American political “revolution” brought the Republicans to office in the (sic) first peaceful transition of power between rival political parties in human history.
1800 Worcestershire sauce was a ketchup and came out about this time.
1800 Jean Baptiste Pointe du Sable, a pioneer trader and founder of the village that became Chicago, sold his holdings and moved to a Missouri farm.
1800 The population of the world doubled from what it was in 1500 to more than 800 million. The world’s population reached about 1 billion about this time. In 1927 it reached 2 billion; in 1959 3 billion; in 1987 5 billion; in 1999 6 billion and in 2011 7 billion.
1800 William Herschel (1738-1822), German-born English astronomer, detected what later became known as infra-red red light in experiments with glass prisms and thermometers. Infrared solar rays.
1800 Alessandro Volta (1745-1827), Italian physicist, first demonstrated the electric pile or battery. Invents the electric cell.
1800 Robert Fulton (35) tested a 20-foot model of his torpedo-armed submarine on the Seine. He made two 20-minute dives himself.
1800 John Chapman (1774-1845), Johnny Appleseed, a Swedenborgian missionary, a land speculator, a heavy drinker and an eccentric dresser, began planting orchards across western Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana from seed. (T&L, 10/1980, p.42) )(AHD, p.225)(HNQ, 1/2/01)
1800 Lieven Bauwens stole a spinning “mule jenny” machine from Britain. He had it dismantled and smuggled out in a cargo of coffee. This enabled the textile industry in Ghent, Belgium, to greatly expand. Britain sentenced Bauwens to death in absentia and Ghent made him a hero.
1800 Mary Robinson (42/43), writer, actress, courtesan and fashion icon, died. In 2005 Sarah Gristwood authored “Perdita: Royal Mistress, Writer and Romantic.” Paula Byrne authored Perdita: The Literary, Theatrical, Scandalous Life of Mary Robinson.”
1800 The Parliament in Westminster passed an Act of Union formally binding Ireland with England and abolished the Irish parliament. The Act of Union entailed the loss of legislative independence of the Irish Parliament.
1800 The French regained the territory of Louisiana from Spain by the secret Treaty of Ildefenso.
1800 Dessalines, a lieutenant of Haitian rebel leader Toussaint L’Ouverture (Louverture),  butchered many mulattoes (the estimates range from 200 to 10,000).
1800 The Althing of Iceland was abolished by the Danish king.
1800 About this time an Arab nomadic tribe settled in the southern Israeli desert of Negev. The Al-Sayyid community that developed there grew with a high incidence of profound deafness due to a recessive gene. The village developed a sign language in response that came to be called the Al-Sayyid Bedouin Sign Language (ABSL). In 2007 Margalit Fox authored “Signs and Wonders,” which told the Al-Sayyid story as part of a history of linguistics and sign language in American and the world.
1800 Ito Jakuchu (b.1716), Japanese painter based in Kyoto, died.
1800 In Sweden Count Balthazar Von Platen started the Gut Canal.
1800 Many Bantu people from Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania were taken from their homes and sold as slaves in Somalia.
1800 In Germany Hymnen and Die Nacht by the poetFriedrich Leopold von Hardenberg, called Novalis (1772-1801). Probably the most romantic of all the Romantics, he symbolized their yearnings as the ‘blue flower.’ This poem expressed another German Romantic idea, the death wish.
1800 John Gilchrist in India, principal of the newly-founded college at Fort William, compiled the first Urdu grammar and dictionary. This made possible translation of foreign literature into Urdu.
1800 Coelina, ou L’Enfant de Mystere by Rene Charles Guilbert de Pixerecourt (1773-1844). He was the first writer to use the word ‘melodrama’ on its modern sense, in his manifesto Le Melodrama. Hw claimed to write for those who could not read, and his plays call for spectacular effects. His work was widely translated.
1800 The government of Burma laid down rules controlling the theatre, to ensure that live and puppet performances were respectful to the King and the Buddhist religion. In fact the theatre became a political force; a noted play, Wizaya by U Pon Nya, was written to incite support for a usurper.
1800 In Wales the revival of National Eisteddfod
1800 The Aeolodion, a keyed wind instrument, is said to have been invented by J.T. Eschenbach of Hamburg. It was subsequently modified by various other mechanicians and eventually superseded by the harmonium.
1800 Birth of Mikha’il ibn Jurjis al-lubnani Mushaqa in Arabia. Musical theorist and writer (d.1888), the most important modern Arabic writer on theory of music.
1800 Joseph Marie Jacquard invented a punch card loom.
1800 French silversmiths arriving after the French Revolution in Canada settled in Quebec which became an important centre of silversmithing: unlike the earlier Huguenot immigrants to America, they were Catholic and most of their work was ecclesiastical.
1800 Figurines in pottery were made at Radonezh, Russia, Viatka and Okhta: those from the last two centres were comedy and caricature figures.
1800 Life size statue group, the Twelve Prophets by Antonio Francisco Lisboa (1738-1814) in Brazil. Sculptor and architect he worked in rococo style and despite paralysis, was considered the most important sculptor in colonial Brazil.
1800 Magic lanterns were equipped with limelights in Europe Cylinders of lime heated by an oxyhydrogen flame.
1800 John Crome (1768-1821) painted his more important large pictures. He and Cotman were considered the major artists of the Norwich school of landscape painting. His pictures of Slade Quarries, Moonrise on the Marshes of Yare, Mousehold Heath and Poringland Oak showed a feeling for the spirit of place which foreshadowed he Romantics.
1800 Beginning of Josiah Spode II’s period of Spode’s Stoke-on-Trent porcelain factory; he finally formulated the bone china recipe (hard-paste porcelain modified by the addition of bone-ash)
1800 Development of gold, silver and copper lustre ware pottery in England
1800 Napoleon establishes himself as First Consul in the Tuileries
1800 French army defeats Austrians at Biberach and Hochstadt.
1800 French army advances on Vienna
1800 Napoleon’s army crosses the Great St. Bernard Pass
1800 British conquer Malta
1800 A plot to assassinate Napoleon discovered in Paris
1800 Thomas Morton: “Speed the Plough,” comedy in which for the first time a reference to the character Mrs. Grundy appears
1800 Jean Paul: “Titan,” a german novel
1800 Mme. de Stael: “On Literature”
1800 Napoleon appoints committee of jurists to draw up Civil Code
1800 Goya: “Portrait of a woman”
1800 Cardinal Barnaba Chiaramonti elected Pope Pius VII (-1823)
1800 Fichte: “Der geschlossene Handelsstant”
1800 Arnold Heeren: “European Political Systems”
1800 Schelling; “System des transzendentalen Idealismus”
1800 Church of United Brethern in Christ founded in the US
1800 Boieldieu: “Le Calife de Baagdad,” opera, Paris
1800 Cherubini: (“The Water Carrier”), opera, Paris
1800 Humphry Davy: “Researches, Chemical and Philosophical, Concerning Nitrous Oxide”
1800 German physician F.J. Hall (1758-1828) founds practice of phrenology
1800 Richard Trevithick constructs light pressure steam engine
1800 Eli Whitney makes muskets with interchangeable parts
1800 Grossglockner, in the Austrian Alps, first successfully scaled
1800 Letter post introduced in Berlin
1800 Ottawa founded
1800 Bill Richmond (1763-1829) a former Negro slave, becomes one of the first popular boxers
1800-1861 This period was covered by Nicholas E. Tawa in his 2000 book: “High-Minded and Low-Down: Music in the Lives of Americans, 1800-1861.”
1800-1900 Charles M. Russell, 19th century American landscape painter. In 2001 his painting “A Disputed Trail” sold for $2.4 million.
1800-1900 In the 1990s Claude Rawson wrote Vol. 4 of “The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism: The Eighteenth Century.”
1800-1900 In California floods turned the Central Valley into a lake 700 miles long.
1800-1900 Sir David Brewster, 19th cent. Scottish scientist, inventor of the kaleidoscope.
1800-1900 J.H. Salisbury was a 19th century English dietician who recommended a diet of ground steak for a variety of ailments including pernicious anemia, tuberculosis and hardening of the arteries. His name gave rise to “Salisbury steak.”
1800-1900 19th century Tokyo was called Edo and served as the shogun’s power seat.
1800-1900 In what later became Pakistan feudal families came to power when the British made weak vassals into a hereditary land-owning elite loyal to London.
1800-1900 In South Africa the Witwatersrand gold mines were discovered, the largest gold reserve find in the world. The gold came from a strip of land 62 miles long and 25 miles wide and produced three-fourths of all the gold ever mined.
1800-1900 The main river channel at Hoi An, Vietnam, shifted toward Danang and made navigation by deep-draft ships difficult, and thus lost its commercial importance. A new port was built on the Han River at Da Nang.

We also have our Giveaway taking place:

For the Giveaway, see our original blog post from Saturday

I finished the Lexicon for this go round, (Found a list of Nautical terms from the period buried in my files to add for the next go round) so time for a little celebration.

For those who missed it, there are a lot of previous posts here of all the letters and you can skip back and have a look.

For this post and running through the week, the winner to be picked on Monday the 5th, I will be giving away a free eBook copy of Jane Austen and Ghosts

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In the world of moviemaking, nothing is as golden as rebooting a classic tale that has made fortunes every time before when it has been adapted for the silver screen. Certainly any work by Jane Austen made into a movie will not only be bankable, but also considered a work of art.

That is of course until the current wave of adaptations that unite her classic stories with all the elements of the afterlife is attempted to be created. That these have found success in the marketplace amongst booklovers may not be quite understood by those who make movies. But that they are a success is understood and a reason to make them into movies.

All that being said, perhaps it would also be fair to say that the very proper Jane, were she present to have anything to say about it, would not be pleased. Of course she has been away from this Earth for nearly 200 hundred years. But does that mean were she upset enough, she wouldn’t come back?

How to win

But to enter the contest I should like 2 things. As Jane deals with old B Horror Movie legends in Jane Austen and Ghosts, I would like you to put in the comments section here:

1) The name of a B movie legend (and please let us try not to repeat since it will be fun to see how many we can come up with. So to start off, I will give one as an example, Boris Karloff)

2) One favorite word from the Lexicon which you can see each separate letter here in the Blog by looking at the previous days posts, or go to the entire lexicon at the Regency Assembly Press website, here (Regency Lexicon)

3) (Optional) Your name of course (if you are registered and signed into WordPress then I can click back to you if you are the winner, but if you are not,) and an email or some way to get you the prize!

4) (Optional) And if you are super proactive, what eBook format you would need should you be our winner!

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