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Archive for July, 2014

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Robert Smith 1st Baron Carrington
22 January 1752 – 18 September 1838

Robert Smith was a British Member of Parliament and banker.

Smith was the third son of Abel Smith and his wife Mary (née Bird). His grandfather Abel Smith was the third son of Thomas Smith, the founder of Smith’s Bank of Nottingham. Smith was elected to the House of Commons for Nottingham in 1779, a seat he held until 1797. In 1796 he was raised to the Peerage of Ireland as Baron Carrington, of Bulcot Lodge. The following year he was made Baron Carrington, of Upton in the County of Nottingham, in the Peerage of Great Britain. He was also a Fellow of the Royal Society and of the Society of Antiquaries. In 1819 he was admitted as Nobleman to Magdalene College, Cambridge.

Lord Carrington married, firstly, Anne, daughter of Lewyns Boldero-Barnard, in 1780. They had one son and five daughters. After her death in 1827 he married, secondly, Charlotte, daughter of John Hudson, in 1836. Carrington died in September 1838, aged 86, and was succeeded in his titles by his only son Robert John, who later assumed the surname of Carington. Lady Carrington died in 1849.

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A Trolling We Will Go Omnibus:The Latter Years

Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but I also have delved into Fantasy.

The Trolling series, is the story of a man, Humphrey. We meet him as he has left youth and become a man with a man’s responsibilities. He is a woodcutter for a small village. It is a living, but it is not necessarily a great living. It does give him strength, muscles.

We follow him in a series of stories that encompass the stages of life. We see him when he starts his family, when he has older sons and the father son dynamic is tested.

We see him when his children begin to marry and have children, and at the end of his life when those he has loved, and those who were his friends proceed him over the threshold into death.

All this while he serves a kingdom troubled by monsters. Troubles that he and his friends will learn to deal with and rectify.

Here are the last two books together as one longer novel.

Trolling, Trolling, Trolling Fly Hides! and We’ll All Go a Trolling.

Available in a variety of formats.

For $5.99 you can get this fantasy adventure.

Trolling-Omnibus-2-FrontCover-2014-07-31-05-30.jpg

Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

Amazon for your Kindle

Trade Paperback

The stories of Humphrey and Gwendolyn. Published separately in: Trolling, Trolling, Trolling Fly Hides! and We’ll All Go a Trolling. These are the tales of how a simple Woodcutter who became a king and an overly educated girl who became his queen helped save the kingdom of Torahn from an ancient evil. Now with the aid of their children and their grandchildren.

Long forgotten is the way to fight the Trolls. Beasts that breed faster than rabbits it seems, and when they decide to migrate to the lands of humans, their seeming invulnerability spell doom for all in the kingdom of Torahn. Not only Torahn but all the human kingdoms that border the great mountains that divide the continent.

The Kingdom of Torahn has settled down to peace, but the many years of war to acheive that peace has seen to changes in the nearby Teantellen Mountains. Always when you think the Trolls have also sought peace, you are fooled for now, forced by Dragons at the highest peaks, the Trolls are marching again.

Now Humphrey is old, too old to lead and must pass these cares to his sons. Will they be as able as he always has been. He can advise, but he does not have the strength he used to have. Nor does Gwendolyn back in the Capital. Here are tales of how leaders we know and are familiar with must learn to trust the next generation to come.

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If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Charles Harcourt Masters
1759-1866

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Sydney Hotel in Sydney Gardens

Charles Harcourt Masters was an English surveyor and architect in Bath.
He made a set of maps of Bath turnpike roads in 1786. In 1789 made a scale model of Bath which he displayed at his home, 21 Old Orchard Street, and later in London: the plans were published in 1794. As a surveyor he worked on the development of the Widcombe and Lyncombe districts of Bath, and also laid out formal gardens and grounds. In his later career he practised as an architect under the name of Harcourt, going into partnership with George Phillips Manners: he then lived at 39 Rivers Street.

  • Sydney Gardens, Bathwick, Bath (1795)
  • Sydney Hotel, Bathwick, Bath (now Holburne Museum of Art) (1796–1797): modifying a design of Thomas Baldwin
  • Battlefield House, Lansdown, Bath (1802)
  • Dyrham Park grounds, Gloucestershire (1798–1799)
  • Harptree Court, East Harptree
  • Bloomfield Crescent, Bath (1801)
  • Portico of the Hetling Pump Room, Bath (1805): uncertain
  • Widcombe Crescent and Widcombe Terrace, Bath (1805)
  • Cothelstone House, Somerset, with George Phillips Manners (1817–1818)

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TWO PEAS IN A POD

Two Peas in a Pod has now passed the exclusivity to Amazon test and is available in wider release, electronically (digitally) for other readers now. We sold a few copies on Amazon but nothing to warrant an exclusivity period. Amazon is too big and too full of itself.

Two Peas in a Pod is still available as a Trade paperback click here to order Regency Assembly Press.

$3.99 for an electronic copy. The Trade Paperback, due to publishing costs and the cut that Amazon takes continue to see a Trade Paperback costing $15.99 (The much hyped royalties that we writers are supposed to get is nowhere near what the news reports say. Most of that price is taken by Amazon.)

Nook-Barnes and Noble

Smashwords

iBookstore (These are my books

and still at Amazon

Here is a picture, which of course you can click on to go fetch the book:

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TWO PEAS IN A POD

978-0-9829989-3-9

Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

There is a visual guide to Two Peas in a Pod RegencyEravisualresearchforTwoPeasinaPodTheThingsThatCatchMyEye-2012-08-22-08-41-2012-11-26-09-36-2013-07-2-06-10-2014-07-30-05-10.jpg as well at Pinterest and a blog post here.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

George Cruikshank
27 September 1792 – 1 February 1878

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George Cruikshank

Cruikshank was born in London. His father, Isaac Cruikshank, was one of the leading caricaturists of the late 1790s and Cruikshank started his career as his father’s apprentice and assistant.

His older brother, Isaac Robert, also followed in the family business as a caricaturist and illustrator. Cruikshank’s early work was caricature; but in 1823, at the age of 31, he started to focus on book illustration. He illustrated the first, 1823 English translation (by Edgar Taylor and David Jardine) of Grimms’ Fairy Tales published in two volumes as German Popular Stories.

On 16 October 1827, he married Mary Ann Walker (1807–1849). Two years after her death, on 7 March 1851, he married Eliza Widdison. The two lived at 263 Hampstead Road, North London.

Upon his death, it was discovered that Cruikshank had fathered 11 illegitimate children with a mistress named Adelaide Attree, his former servant, who lived close to where he lived with his wife. Adelaide was ostensibly married and had taken the married surname ‘Archibold’.

Cruikshank’s early career was renowned for his social caricatures of English life for popular publications.

He achieved early success collaborating with William Hone in his political satire The Political House That Jack Built (1819).

In the same year he produced the remarkable anti-abolitionist New Union Club. It satirised a dinner party organised by abolitionists with black guests.

His first major work was Pierce Egan’s Life in London (1821). This was followed by The Comic Almanack (1835–1853) and Omnibus (1842).

He gained notoriety with his political prints that attacked the royal family and leading politicians. In 1820 he received a royal bribe of £100 for a pledge “not to caricature His Majesty” (George IV of the United Kingdom) “in any immoral situation”. His work included a personification of England named John Bull who was developed from about 1790 in conjunction with other British satirical artists such as James Gillray, and Thomas Rowlandson.

Cruikshank replaced one of his major influences, James Gillray, as England’s most popular satirist. For a generation he delineated Tories, Whigs and Radicals impartially. Satirical material came to him from every public event – wars abroad, the enemies of Britain (he was highly patriotic), the frolic, among other qualities, such as the weird and terrible, in which he excelled. His hostility to enemies of Britain and a crude racism is evident in his illustrations commissioned to accompany William Maxwell’s History of the Irish rebellion in 1798 (1845) where his lurid depictions of incidents in the rebellion were characterised by the simian-like portrayal of Irish rebels. Among the other racially engaged works of Cruikshank there were caricatures about the “legal barbarities” of the Chinese, the subject given by his friend, Dr. W. Gourley, a participant in the ideological battle around the Arrow War, 1856–60.

For Charles Dickens, Cruikshank illustrated Sketches by Boz (1836), The Mudfog Papers (1837–38) and Oliver Twist (1838). Cruikshank even acted in Dickens’s amateur theatrical company.

On 30 December 1871 Cruikshank published a letter in The Times which claimed credit for much of the plot of Oliver Twist. The letter launched a fierce controversy around who created the work. Cruikshank was not the first Dickens illustrator to make such a claim. Robert Seymour who illustrated the Pickwick Papers suggested that the idea for that novel was originally his; however, in his preface to the 1867 edition, Dickens strenuously denied any specific input.

The friendship between Cruikshank and Dickens soured further when Cruikshank became a fanatical teetotaler in opposition to Dickens’s views of moderation.

In Somerset Maugham’s short story “Miss King”, Cruickshank’s influence is referenced: “She wore a large white cotton nightcap (on entering Ashenden has noticed the brown wig on a stand on the dressing-table) tied under the chin and a white voluminous nightdress that came high up in the neck. Nightcap and nightdress belonged to a past age and reminded you of Cruickshank’s illustrations to the novels of Charles Dickens.”

In the late 1840s, Cruikshank’s focus shifted from book illustration to an obsession with temperance and anti-smoking. Formerly a heavy drinker, he now supported, lectured to, and supplied illustrations for the National Temperance Society and the Total Abstinence Society, among others. The best known of these are The Bottle, 8 plates (1847), with its sequel, The Drunkard’s Children, 8 plates (1848), with the ambitious work, The Worship of Bacchus, published by subscription after the artist’s oil painting, now in the Tate Gallery, London. For his efforts he was made vice president of the National Temperance League in 1856.

When the invasion scare of 1859 led to the creation of the Volunteer Movement, Cruikshank was one of those who organised Rifle Volunteer Corps (RVCs). At first his unit was the 24th Surrey RVC, which recruited from working men who were total abstainers and was named ‘Havelock’s Own’ in honour of Major-General Sir Henry Havelock, a hero of the Indian Mutiny and pioneer of Temperance Clubs in the army. However, Cruikshank received little encouragement from the Lord-Lieutenant of Surrey, and was rebuked for crossing into Kent to recruit. Disgusted, he disbanded his unit in 1862 and began anew in Middlesex, organising the 48th Middlesex RVC (Havelock’s Temperance Volunteers). The unit ran into financial difficulties and when Cruikshank was forced to retire due to age, he was replaced as commanding officer by Lt-Col Cuthbert Vickers, a wealthy shipowner. The 48th Middlesex merged with the 2nd City of London RVC, also a working-men’s unit, composed mainly of printers from the Fleet Street area, and the combined unit had a long history as the City of London Rifles.

After he developed palsy in later life, Cruikshank’s health and work began to decline in quality. He died on 1 February 1878 and was originally buried in Kensal Green Cemetery. In November 1878 his remains were exhumed and reburied in St. Paul’s Cathedral. Punch magazine, which presumably did not know of his large illegitimate family, said in its obituary: “There never was a purer, simpler, more straightforward or altogether more blameless man. His nature had something childlike in its transparency.”

In his lifetime he created nearly 10,000 prints, illustrations, and plates. There are collections of his works in the British Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum. A Royal Society of Arts blue plaque commemorates Cruikshank at 293 Hampstead Road in Camden Town.

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A Trolling We Will Go Omnibus:The Early Years Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but I also have delved into Fantasy.

The Trolling series, (the first three are in print) is the story of a man, Humphrey. We meet him as he has left youth and become a man with a man’s responsibilities.

We follow him in a series of stories that encompass the stages of life. We see him when he starts his family, when he has older sons and the father son dynamic is tested.

We see him when his children begin to marry and have children, and at the end of his life when those he has loved, and those who were his friends proceed him over the threshold into death.

All this while he serves a kingdom troubled by monsters. Troubles that he and his friends will learn to deal with and rectify.

Here are the first three books together as one longer novel.

A Trolling We Will Go, Trolling Down to Old Mah Wee and Trolling’s Pass and Present.

Available in a variety of formats.

For $6.99 you can get this fantasy adventure.

PastedGraphic1-2013-07-1-06-10-2014-07-29-05-10.jpg

Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

Amazon for your Kindle

Trade Paperback

The stories of Humphrey and Gwendolyn. Published separately in: A Trolling we Will Go, Trolling Down to Old Mah Wee and Trollings Pass and Present.

These are the tales of how a simple Woodcutter and an overly educated girl help save the kingdom without a king from an ancient evil. Long forgotten is the way to fight the Trolls.

Beasts that breed faster than rabbits it seems, and when they decide to migrate to the lands of humans, their seeming invulnerability spell doom for all in the kingdom of Torahn. Not only Torahn but all the human kingdoms that border the great mountains that divide the continent.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

George Green
14 July 1793 – 31 May 1841

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George Green

Green was born and lived for most of his life in the English town of Sneinton, Nottinghamshire, now part of the city of Nottingham. His father, also named George, was a baker who had built and owned a brick windmill used to grind grain.

In his youth, Green was described as having a frail constitution and a dislike for doing work in his father’s bakery. He had no choice in the matter, however, and as was common for the time he likely began working daily to earn his living at the age of five.

Roughly 25–50% of children in Nottingham received any schooling in this period. The majority of schools were Sunday schools, run by the Church, and children would typically attend for one or two years only. Recognizing the young Green’s above average intellect, and being in a strong financial situation due to his successful bakery, his father enrolled him in March 1801 at Robert Goodacre’s Academy in Upper Parliament Street. Robert Goodacre was a well-known science populariser and educator of the time. He published Essay on the Education of Youth, in which he wrote that he did not “study the interest of the boy but the embryo Man”. To a non-specialist, he would have seemed deeply knowledgeable in science and maths, but a close inspection of his essay and curriculum revealed that the extent of his mathematical teachings was limited to algebra, trigonometry and logarithms. Thus, Green’s later mathematical contributions, which exhibited knowledge of very modern developments in maths, could not have resulted from his tenure at the Robert Goodacre Academy. He stayed for only four terms (one school year), and it was speculated by his contemporaries that he probably exhausted all they had to teach him.

In 1773 George’s father moved to Nottingham, which at the time had a reputation for being a pleasant town with open spaces and wide roads. By 1831, however, the population had increased nearly five times, in part due to the budding industrial revolution, and the city became known as one of the worst slums in England. There were frequent riots by starving workers, often associated with special hostility towards bakers and millers on the suspicion that they were hiding grain to drive up food prices.

For these reasons, in 1807, George Green senior bought a plot of land in Sneinton. On this plot of land he built a “brick wind corn mill”, now famously referred to as Green’s Windmill. It was technologically impressive for its time, but required nearly twenty-four hour maintenance, which was to become George Green’s burden for the next twenty years.

Just as with baking, Green found the responsibilities of operating the mill annoying and tedious. Grain from the fields was arriving continuously at the mill’s doorstep, and the sails of the windmill had to be constantly adjusted to the windspeed, both to prevent damage in high winds, and to maximise rotational speed in low winds. The millstones that would continuously grind against each other, could wear down or cause a fire if they ran out of grain to grind. Every month the stones, which weighed over a ton, would have to be replaced or repaired.

In 1823 Green formed a relationship with Jane Smith, the daughter of William Smith, hired by Green Senior as mill manager. Although Green and Jane Smith never married, Jane eventually became known as Jane Green and the couple had seven children together; all but the first had Green as a baptismal name. The youngest child was born 13 months before Green’s death. Green provided for his common-law wife and children in his will.

When Green was thirty, he became a member of the Nottingham Subscription Library. This library exists today, and was likely one of the only sources of Green’s advanced mathematical knowledge. Unlike more conventional libraries, the subscription library was exclusive to a hundred or so subscribers, and the first on the list of subscribers was the Duke of Newcastle. This library catered to requests for specialised books and journals that satisfied the particular interests of their subscribers.

In 1828, Green published An Essay on the Application of Mathematical Analysis to the Theories of Electricity and Magnetism, which is the essay he is most famous for today. It was published privately at the author’s expense, because he thought it would be presumptuous for a person like himself, with no formal education in mathematics, to submit the paper to an established journal. When Green published his Essay, it was sold on a subscription basis to 51 people, most of whom were friends and probably could not understand it.

The wealthy landowner and mathematician Edward Bromhead bought a copy and encouraged Green to do further work in mathematics. Not believing the offer was sincere, Green did not contact Bromhead for two years.

By 1829, the time when Green’s father died, the senior Green had become one of the gentry due to his considerable accumulated wealth and land owned, roughly half of which he left to his son and the other half to his daughter. The young Green, now thirty-six years old, consequently was able to use this wealth to abandon his miller duties and pursue mathematical studies.

Members of the Nottingham Subscription Library who knew Green repeatedly insisted that he obtain a proper University education. In particular, one of the library’s most prestigious subscribers was Sir Edward Bromhead, with whom Green shared many correspondences; he insisted that Green go to Cambridge.

In 1832, aged nearly forty, Green was admitted as an undergraduate at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. He was particularly insecure about his lack of knowledge of Greek and Latin, which were prerequisites, but it turned out not to be as hard for him to learn as he believed, as the expected mastery was not as high as he had expected. In the mathematics examinations, he won the first-year mathematical prize. He graduated BA in 1838 as a 4th Wrangler (the 4th highest scoring student in his graduating class, coming after James Joseph Sylvester who scored 2nd).

Following his graduation, Green was elected a fellow of the Cambridge Philosophical Society. Even without his stellar academic standing, the Society had already read and made note of his Essay and three other publications, and so Green was warmly welcomed.

The next two years provided an unparalleled opportunity for Green to read, write and discuss his scientific ideas. In this short time he published an additional six publications with applications to hydrodynamics, sound and optics.

In his final years at Cambridge, Green became rather ill, and in 1840 he returned to Sneinton, only to die a year later. There are rumours that at Cambridge, Green had “succumbed to alcohol”, and some of his earlier supporters, such as Sir Edward Bromhead, tried to distance themselves from him.

Green’s work was not well known in the mathematical community during his lifetime. Besides Green himself, the first mathematician to quote his 1828 work was the Briton Robert Murphy in his 1833 work. In 1845, four years after Green’s death, Green’s work was rediscovered by the young William Thomson (then aged 21), later known as Lord Kelvin, who popularised it for future mathematicians. According to the book “George Green” by D.M. Cannell, William Thomson noticed Murphy’s citation of Green’s 1828 essay but found it difficult to locate Green’s 1828 work; he finally got some copies of Green’s 1828 work from William Hopkins in 1845.

Green’s work on the motion of waves in a canal anticipates the WKB approximation of quantum mechanics, while his research on light-waves and the properties of the ether produced what is now known as the Cauchy-Green tensor.

Westminster Abbey has a memorial stone for Green in the nave adjoining the graves of Sir Isaac Newton and Lord Kelvin.

It is unclear to historians exactly where Green obtained information on current developments in mathematics, as Nottingham had little in the way of intellectual resources. What is even more mysterious is that Green had used “the Mathematical Analysis”, a form of calculus derived from Leibniz that was virtually unheard of, or even actively discouraged, in England at the time (due to Leibniz being a contemporary of Newton who had his own methods that were thus championed in England). This form of calculus, and the developments of mathematicians such as Laplace, Lacroix and Poisson were not taught even at Cambridge, let alone Nottingham, and yet Green had not only heard of these developments, but also improved upon them.

It is speculated that only one person educated in mathematics, John Toplis, headmaster of Nottingham High School 1806–1819, graduate from Cambridge and an enthusiast of French mathematics, is known to have lived in Nottingham at the time.
List of publications

  • An Essay on the Application of Mathematical Analysis to the Theories of Electricity and Magnetism. By George Green, Nottingham. Printed for the Author by T. Wheelhouse, Nottingham. 1828. (Quarto, vii + 72 pages.)
  • Mathematical Investigations concerning the Laws of the Equilibrium of Fluids analogous to the Electric Fluid, with other similar Researches. By George Green, Esq., Communicated by Sir Edward Ffrench Bromhead, Bart., M.A., F.R.S.L. and E. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 12 November 1832, printed in the Transactions 1833. Quatro, 64 pages.) Vol. III, Part I.
  • On the Determination of the Exterior and Interior Attractions of Ellipsoids of Variable Densities. By George Green, Esq., Caius College. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 6 May 1833, printed in the Transactions 1835. Quarto, 35 pages.) Vol. III, Part III.
  • Researches on the Vibration of Pendulums in Fluid Media. By George Green, Esq., Communicated by Sir Edward Ffrench Bromhead, Bart., M.A., F.R.S.S. Lond. and Ed. (Royal Society of Edinburgh, read 16 December 1833, printed in the Transactions 1836, Quarto, 9 pages.) Vol. III, Part I.
  • On the Motion of Waves in a Variable Canal of Small Width and Depth. By George Green, Esq., BA, of Caius College. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 15 May 1837, printed in the Transactions 1838. Quarto, 6 pages.) Vol. VI, Part IV.
  • On the Reflexion and Refraction of Sound. By George Green, Esq., BA, of Caius College, Cambridge. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 11 December 1837, printed in the Transactions 1838. Quarto, 11 pages.) Vol. VI, Part III.
  • On the Laws of Relexion and Refraction of Light at the common Surface of two non-crystallized Media. By George Green, Esq., BA, of Caius College. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 11 December 1837, printed in the Transactions 1838. Quarto, 24 pages.) Vol. VII, Part I.
  • Note on the Motion of Waves in Canals. By George Green, Esq., BA, of Caius College. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 18 February 1839, printed in the Transactions 1839. Quarto, 9 pages.) Vol. VII, Part I.
  • Supplement to a Memoir on the Reflexion and Refraction of Light. By George Green, Esq., BA, of Caius College. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 6 May 1839, printed in the Transactions 1839. Quarto, 8 pages.) Vol. VII, Part I.
  • On the Propagation of Light in Crystallized Media. By George Green, BA, Fellow of Caius College. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 20 May 1839, printed in the Transactions 1839. Quarto, 20 pages.) Vol. VII, Part II.

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