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Archive for July, 2014

Colonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence For your enjoyment, one of the Regency Romances I published.

It is available for sale and I hope that you will take the opportunity to order your copy.

For yourself or as a gift. It is now available in a variety of formats.

For just a few dollars this Regency Romance can be yours for your eReaders or physically in Trade Paperback.

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Witnessing his cousin marry for love and not money, as he felt destined to do, Colonel Fitzwilliam refused to himself to be jealous. He did not expect his acquaintance with the Bennet Clan to change that.    

Catherine Bennet, often called Kitty, had not given a great deal of thought to how her life might change with her sisters Elizabeth and Jane becoming wed to rich and connected men. Certainly meeting Darcy’s handsome cousin, a Colonel, did not affect her.   

 But one had to admit that the connections of the Bingleys and Darcys were quite advantageous. All sorts of men desired introductions now that she had such wealthy new brothers.    

Kitty knew that Lydia may have thought herself fortunate when she had married Wickham, the first Bennet daughter to wed. Kitty, though, knew that true fortune had come to her. She just wasn’t sure how best to apply herself.

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Beggars Can’t Be Choosier Reviewed.

Beggars Can’t be Choosier BeggarsCover-2014-07-27-09-43.jpg was reviewed again today. Another fantastic Review and I hope you can go to this webpage The_Review_Group__Beggars_Can_t_be_Choosier_by_D_W_Wilkin_-_A_Review_by_Linda_Root_-2014-07-27-09-43.jpg to see it. I am even giving away a digital copy of Beggars to one of those who stop by and enters the drawing there.

The Review is a website that reviews Historical Novels and my book was selected to be reviewed by my not so near neighbor, Linda Root, who I met on the FaceBook various writing forums and then later found she lived on the other side of the mountain (about 1+ hours away). We have never met, but we might be the closest in distance of any other writer of the hundreds I have met. Linda writes Historicals and she chose to tackle Beggars. A genre that she hasn’t touched since college, and Linda has now been out of college long enough to have had a career and retire.

Her books include: 41SLBhKWBKL-2014-07-27-09-43.jpgMidwife’s Secret I: The mystery of the Hidden Princess and 51Ei-Ktwt7L-2014-07-27-09-43.jpg The First Marie and the Queen of Scots

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Augustus Henry FitzRoy 3rd Duke of Grafton
28 September 1735 – 14 March 1811

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Augustus Henry FitzRoy

Augustus Henry FitzRoy 3rd Duke of Grafton

A son of Lord Augustus FitzRoy, a Captain in the Royal Navy, and Elizabeth Cosby, daughter of Colonel William Cosby, who served as a colonial Governor of New York. His father was the third son of the 2nd Duke of Grafton and Lady Henrietta Somerset, which made FitzRoy a great-grandson of both the 1st Duke of Grafton and the Marquess of Worcester. He was notably a fourth-generation descendant of King Charles II and the 1st Duchess of Cleveland. His younger brother was the 1st Baron Southampton. From the death of his uncle in 1747, he was styled Earl of Euston as his grandfather’s heir apparent.

Lord Euston was educated at Hackney School, made the Grand Tour and obtained a degree at Peterhouse, University of Cambridge.

In 1756, he entered Parliament as MP for Boroughbridge, a pocket borough; several months later, he switched constituencies to Bury St Edmunds, which was controlled by his family. However, a year later, his grandfather died and he succeeded as 3rd Duke of Grafton, which elevated him to the House of Lords.

He first became known in politics as an opponent of Lord Bute, a favourite of King George III. Grafton aligned himself with the Duke of Newcastle against Lord Bute, whose term as Prime Minister was short-lived largely because it was felt that the peace terms to which he had agreed at the Treaty of Paris were not a sufficient return for Britain’s performance in the Seven Years War.

In 1765, Grafton was appointed a Privy Counsellor; then, following discussions with William Pitt the Elder, he was appointed Northern Secretary in Lord Rockingham’s first government. However, he retired the following year, and Pitt (by then Lord Chatham) formed a ministry in which Grafton was First Lord of the Treasury but not Prime Minister.

Chatham’s illness, at the end of 1767, resulted in Grafton becoming the Government’s effective leader (he is credited with entering the office of Prime Minister in 1768)(Just 33 years old), but political differences, the impact of the Corsican Crisis and the attacks of “Junius” led to his resignation in January 1770.

Also, in 1768, Grafton became Chancellor of Cambridge University. He became Lord Privy Seal in Lord North’s ministry (1771) but resigned in 1775, being in favor of conciliatory action towards the American colonists. In the second Rockingham ministry of 1782, he was again Lord Privy Seal. In later years he was a prominent Unitarian, being one of the early members of the inaugural Essex Street Chapel under Rev. Theophilus Lindsey.

On 29 January 1756, he married The Hon. Anne Liddell (1737–1804), daughter of the 1st Baron Ravensworth. They had three children:

  • Lady Georgiana FitzRoy , who married John Smyth
  • George Henry FitzRoy, 4th Duke of Grafton
  • General Lord Charles FitzRoy, who married, firstly, Frances Mundy, secondly, Lady Frances Stewart

After the Duchess had become pregnant by her lover, the Earl of Upper Ossory, she and the Duke were divorced by Act of Parliament in 1769 (DWW-When he was Prime Minister).

Two months later, in May 1769, the Duke married Elizabeth Wrottesley, daughter of the Reverend Sir Richard Wrottesley, Dean of Worcester. They had the following children:

  • Lord Henry FitzRoy, clergyman; he married Caroline Pigot
  • Lord Frederick FitzRoy.
  • Lady Augusta FitzRoy, who married Rev. George F. Tavel
  • Lady Frances FitzRoy, who married the 1st Baron Churchill
  • Admiral Lord William FitzRoy married Georgiana Raikes
  • Lord John Edward FitzRoy
  • Lady Charlotte FitzRoy
  • Lady Elizabeth FitzRoy married her cousin Lt. Gen. The Hon. William FitzRoy
  • Lady Isabella FitzRoy, married Barrington Pope Blachford

The Duke of Grafton’s Government:

  • Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, and Leader of the House of Lords: The Duke of Grafton
  • Lord Chancellor: The Lord Camden
  • Lord President of the Council: The Earl Gower
  • Lord Privy Seal: The Earl of Bristol
  • Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons: Lord North
  • Secretary of State for the Northern Department: Henry Seymour Conway (1766–1768), The Viscount Weymouth (1768), The Earl of Rochford (1768–1770)
  • Secretary of State for the Southern Department: The Earl of Shelburne (1766–1768), The Viscount Weymouth (1768–1770)
  • Secretary of State for the Colonies: The Earl of Hillsborough
  • Master-General of the Ordnance: The Marquess of Granby
  • First Lord of the Admiralty: Sir Edward Hawke

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

William Hone
3 June 1780 – 8 November 1842

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William Hone

Hone was born at Bath, and had a strict religious upbringing. The only education he received was to be taught to read from the Bible. His father moved to London in 1783, and in 1790 Hone was placed in an attorney’s office. After two and a half years in the office of a solicitor at Chatham he returned to London to become clerk to a solicitor at Gray’s Inn. But he disliked the law, and had learned to think for himself. To the great concern of his father, he joined the London Corresponding Society in 1796, which campaigned to extend the vote to working men and was deeply unpopular with the government, who had tried to charge its leaders with treason.

Hone married in 1800, and started a book and print shop with a circulating library in Lambeth Walk. He soon moved to St Martin’s Churchyard, where he brought out his first publication, Shaw’s Gardener (1806). It was at this time that he and his friend, John Bone, tried to establish a popular savings bank, and even spoke to the President of the Board of Trade about the project; they were unsuccessful. Bone then joined Hone in a bookseller’s business; but bankruptcy was the result.

In 1811, Hone was employed by the booksellers as auctioneer to the trade, and had an office in Ivy Lane. Independent investigations carried on by him into the condition of lunatic asylums led again to business difficulties and failure, but he took a small lodging in the Old Bailey, keeping himself and his now large family by contributions to magazines and reviews. He hired a small shop, or rather box, in Fleet Street but this was twice robbed, and valuable books lent for show were stolen. In 1815 he started the Traveller newspaper, and tried in vain to save Elizabeth Fenning, a cook convicted on thin evidence of poisoning her employers with arsenic. Although Fenning was executed, Hone’s 240 page book on the subject, The Important Results of an Elaborate Investigation into the Mysterious Case of Eliza Fenning — a landmark in investigative journalism – demolished the prosecution’s case.

From 1 February to 25 October 1817, Hone published the Reformists’ Register, using it to criticise state abuses, which he later attacked in the famous political squibs and parodies, illustrated by George Cruikshank. In April 1817 three ex-officio informations were filed against him by the attorney-general, Sir William Garrow. Three separate trials took place in the Guildhall before special juries on 18, 19 and 20 December 1817. The first, for publishing The Late John Wilkes’s Catechism of a Ministerial Member (1817), was before Mr Justice Abbot (afterwards Lord Tenterden); the second, for parodying the litany and libelling the Prince Regent in The Political Litany (1817), and the third, for publishing the Sinecurist’s Creed (1817), a parody on the Athanasian Creed, were before Lord Ellenborough.

The prosecution took the ground that the prints were harmful to public morals and brought the prayer-book and even religion itself into contempt. The real motives of the prosecution were political: Hone had ridiculed the habits and exposed the corruption of those in power. He went to the root of the matter when he wished the jury “to understand that, had he been a publisher of ministerial parodies, he would not then have been defending himself on the floor of that court.” In spite of illness and exhaustion Hone spoke on each of the three days for about seven hours. Although his judges were biased against him, he was acquitted on each count, and the result was received enthusiastically by immense crowds inside and outside the court. Soon afterwards, a public collection was made on his behalf.

Among Hone’s most successful political satires were The Political house that Jack built (1819), The Queen’s Matrimonial Ladder (1820), Ill favour of Queen Caroline, The Man in the Moon (1820) and The Political Showman (1821), all illustrated by Cruikshank. Many of his squibs are directed against a certain “Dr Slop”, a nickname given by him to Dr (afterwards Sir John) Stoddart, publisher of The Times. In researches for his defence he had come upon some curious and at that time little trodden literary ground, and the results were shown by his publication in 1820 of his Apocryphal New Testament, and in 1823 of his Ancient Mysteries Explained. In 1826 he published the Every-day Book, in 1827-1828 the Table-Book, and in 1829 the Year-Book. All three were collections of curious information on manners, antiquities and various other subjects.

These are the works by which Hone is best remembered. In preparing them he had the approval of Robert Southey and the assistance of Charles Lamb, but they were not financially successful, and Hone was lodged in King’s Bench Prison for debt. Friends, however, again came to his assistance, and he was established in a coffee-house in Gracechurch Street; but this, like most of his business enterprises, ended in failure. Hone’s attitude of mind had gradually changed to that of extreme devoutness, and during the latter years of his life, he became a follower of Rev. Thomas Binney and preached in Binney’s Weigh House Chapel, Eastcheap. In 1830 he edited Strutt’s Sports and Pastimes of the people of England, and he contributed to the first number of the Penny Magazine. He was also for some years sub-editor of The Patriot. He died at Tottenham and is buried at Dr Watts’ Walk in Abney Park Cemetery, Stoke Newington.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Sir Richard Sutton
31 July 1733 – 10 January 1802

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Richard Sutton

He was the son of Sir Robert Sutton and Judith Tichborne.

He entered Parliament in 1768 as member for St. Albans which he represented until 1780. (Somewhere between 1768 and 1772 he served asUnder Secretary of State.) In September 1780, he was simultaneously elected to Aldborough and to Sandwich. He chose to represent the latter until 1784, thus necessitating a by-election for the former constituency.

In 1784, he became a representative for Boroughbridge with the Irish peer Viscount Palmerston, which he represented until 1796. He served a total of 28 years in Parliament.

He married three times: 1st to Susan Crespigny, 2nd to Anne Williams, daughter of William Peere Williams esq., and 3rd to Margaret Porter. He and his second wife, Anne, had at least seven children: their eldest son was John Sutton, who married Sophia Frances Chaplin, daughter of Charles Chaplin, esq., of Tathwell, Lincolnshire. John died in the lifetime of his father, leaving a son:

    • Sir Richard Sutton, 2nd Baronet who succeeded his grandfather to the baronetcy, aged 4.

The baronetcy was granted in 1772, after Sutton had retired from the office of Under Secretary of State.

Richard was a great-grandson of Henry Sutton, younger brother of Robert Sutton, 1st Lord Lexington (which peerage became extinct in 1723). The Sutton baronets were thus distantly related to the dukes of Rutland, who were descended from the marriage of the 3rd duke to the Hon. Bridget Sutton, heiress of Robert Sutton, 2nd Baron Lexinton.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Algernon Percy 1st Earl Beverly
21 January 1750 – 21 October 1830

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Algernon Percy

Born Algernon Smithson, he was the second son of Hugh Percy, 1st Duke of Northumberland, and his wife, Lady Elizabeth Seymour, only daughter of Algernon Seymour, 7th Duke of Somerset. He was the brother of Hugh Percy, 2nd Duke of Northumberland, and the half-brother of James Smithson. He was educated at Eton.

In 1774, Percy was elected MP for Northumberland. He was elected MP for both Northumberland and Bere Alston in 1780, and chose to continue sitting for Northumberland. In 1786, he left the Commons when he inherited his father’s barony of Lovaine (a title which was created for his father with a special remainder to pass to Algernon as a second son). He was created Earl of Beverley, in the County of York, in 1790.

Lord Beverley married Isabella Burrell, second daughter of Peter Burrell and sister of Peter Burrell, 1st Baron Gwydyr, in 1775. Their surviving children were:

  • George Percy, later 5th Duke of Northumberland
  • Hon. Algernon Percy, diplomat.
  • Hon. Hugh Percy, later Bishop of Rochester and Carlisle.
  • Hon. Josceline Percy, naval commander.
  • Hon. Henry Percy, naval officer.
  • Hon. William Henry Percy, politician and naval commander.
  • Hon. Francis John Percy, army officer.
  • Lord Charles Greatheed-Bertie-Percy
  • Lady Charlotte Percy, married the 3rd Earl of Ashburnham and had issue.
  • Lady Emily Charlotte Percy, married Andrew Mortimer Drummond.
  • Lady Elizabeth Percy
  • Lady Louisa Margaret Percy

Lord Beverley died in October 1830, aged 80, and was succeeded by his eldest son, George, who later inherited the dukedom of Northumberland from his cousin, the 4th Duke, in 1865.

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Beggars Can’t Be Choosier Reviewed.

Beggars Can’t be Choosier BeggarsCover-2014-07-23-09-43.jpg was reviewed again today. Another fantastic Review and I hope you can go to this webpage The_Review_Group__Beggars_Can_t_be_Choosier_by_D_W_Wilkin_-_A_Review_by_Linda_Root_-2014-07-23-09-43.jpg to see it. I am even giving away a digital copy of Beggars to one of those who stop by and enters the drawing there.

The Review is a website that reviews Historical Novels and my book was selected to be reviewed by my not so near neighbor, Linda Root, who I met on the FaceBook various writing forums and then later found she lived on the other side of the mountain (about 1+ hours away). We have never met, but we might be the closest in distance of any other writer of the hundreds I have met. Linda writes Historicals and she chose to tackle Beggars. A genre that she hasn’t touched since college, and Linda has now been out of college long enough to have had a career and retire.

Her books include: 41SLBhKWBKL-2014-07-23-09-43.jpgMidwife’s Secret I: The mystery of the Hidden Princess and 51Ei-Ktwt7L-2014-07-23-09-43.jpg The First Marie and the Queen of Scots

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