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Archive for February, 2013

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Lord Sefton William Philip Molyneux, 2nd Earl of Sefton
September 18 1772-November 20 1838

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The Earl of Sefton is the first on the left

The only son of the 1st Earl of Sefton and a grandson of the Earl of Harrington, in 1792 he married Maria Craven, daughter of the 6th Baron Craven. She, Lady Molyneux was a patroness of Almack’s. His mother was one of the founding patronesses. They had ten children, four sons, six daughters. He became the Earl in 1795.

He was educated at Eton and Oxford. He was MP for Droitwich between 1816-1831 (The Earl of Sefton was an Irish peerage.) He was created Baron Sefton of Croxteth in 1831 and this was a Peerage of the United Kingdom and now he entered the House of Lords.

Sefton was a member of the Prince Regent’s set. He was a gambler and sportsman. He was the third Master of the Quorn (1800-1805) a famous hunt. He founded the Waterloo Cup for coursing at Altcar. Sefton leased the land at Aintree to the Waterloo Hotel which established the Aintree Racecourse, home of the Grand National Steeplechase.

In his set, he was known as Lord Dashalong and was a founder of the Four-in-Hand club which races their carriages through the streets of London. Another member was Lord Worcester, later the sixth Duke of Beaufort. Sefton was also the half-uncle of Maria Fitzherbert, the wife of the Prince Regent and it was Sefton and his countess who sponsored Maria in London society.

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The Shattered Mirror
For your holiday enjoyment, one of the Regency Romances I published. It is available for sale and I hope that you will take the opportunity to order your copy for the holiday season. For yourself or as a gift.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For just a few dollars this Regency Romance can be yours for your eReaders or physically in Trade Paperback.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

iBookstore

Amazon for your Kindle and in Trade Paperback
Bridget Halifax-Stokes was giddy with the excitement of her season in London. Town had beckoned and her season came on the heels of the end of the war against the tyrant.

All the handsome men were returning heroes. What better year to come out. Her father thought it all nonsense. Her mother believed that it would be the best showing of any of her daughters.

More lords available and luck that Bridget was just the perfect age.

All is fun and frivolity until Bridget literally crashes into Sir Patrick Hampton as he limps along the high street.

A man she knew once well, now a stranger with dark and foreboding eyes.

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If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Richard Cumberland
February 19 1732-May 7 1811

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Cumberland was born at Trinity College, Cambridge, the son of a clergyman who later became the Bishop of Clonfert and then the Bishop of Kilmore. Cumberland’s mother was the daughter of the master of Trinity College. His mother played in Cohn and Phoebe and his youngest sister became the poet Mary Alcock.

Cumberland was educated at Bury St. Edmunds and was thought to become a good scholar, though Cumberland’s grandfather was doubtful of his grandson’s teachers. Later Cumberland studied at the Westminster School. Here was Warren Hastings, George Colman, Charles Churchill and William Cowper. Then to Trinity College of course where he took his degree in 1750.

The Earl of Halifax who was President of the Board of Trade in the Duke of Newcastle’s government offered Cumberland the post of private secretary. The post allowed him time to write so he took it. He married his cousin Elizabeth Ridge in 1759 and was appointed Crown-Agent for Nova Scotia. In 1761 he went with Halifax to Ireland and was appointed Ulster secretary. He declined the offer of a baronetcy. In 1775 under Lord George Germain he was appointed secretary to the Board of Trade and Plantations which he held until Edmund Burke’s reforms abolished them.

In 1780 he was sent on a confidential mission to Spain to negotiate a peace treaty during the American War of Independence. They could not come to an agreement because of the dominion of Gibraltar. The government refused then to pay Cumberland for his expenses and he was out of pocket £4500. Burke’s reform now had him out of his office and his service to the government was over.

Cumberland though is remembered for his plays and memoirs. He had 54 plays, operas and farces. About half were comedies. A strength was to take characters from the borders of the empire and vindicate them from prejudice. His first play was a tragedy, The Banishment of Cicero from 1761 and then he wrote a musical drama, The Summer’s Tale.

Other Comedies include:

  • Calypso (1779)
  • The Natural Son (1785)
  • The Country Attorney (1787)
  • The Impostors (1789)
  • The School for Widows (1789)
  • The Box-Lobby Challenge (1794)
  • The Jew (1794)
  • The Wheel of Fortune (1795)
  • First Love (1795)
  • The Last of the Family (1797)
  • The Village Fete (1797)
  • False Impressions (1797)
  • The Sailor’s Daughter (1804)
  • Hint to Husbands (1806)

The other works:

  • The Note of Hand (1774)
  • The Princess of Parma (1778)
  • Songs for a musical comedy, The Widow of Delphi (1780)
  • The Battle of Hastings (1778)
  • The Carmelite (1784)
  • The Mysterious Husband (1783)
  • The Days of Yore (1796)
  • The Clouds (1797)
  • Joanna of Mondfaucon (1800)
  • The Jew of Mogadore (1808)
  • The Walloons ( 1782)
  • The Passive Husband (1798)
  • The Eccentric Lover (1798)
  • Lovers’ Resolutions (1802)
  • Confession
  • Don Pedro (1796)
  • Alcanor (1785)
  • Torrendal
  • The Sibyl, or The Elder Brutus
  • Tiberius in Capreae
  • The False Demetrius

Adaptations
Aristophanes’ Clouds (1798)
William Shakespeare’s Timon of Athens (1771)
Philip Massinger’s The Bondman and The Duke of Milan (both 1779).

Novels

  • Arundel (1789)
  • Henry (1795)
  • John de Lancaster (1809)

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Trolling Down to Old Mah Wee
Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but I also have delved into Fantasy. The Trolling series, (the first three are in print) is the story of a man, Humphrey. We meet him as he has left youth and become a man with a man’s responsibilities. We follow him in a series of stories that encompass the stages of life. We see him when he starts his family, when he has older sons and the father son dynamic is tested. We see him when his children begin to marry and have children, and at the end of his life when those he has loved, and those who were his friends proceed him over the threshold into death.
All this while he serves a kingdom troubled by monsters. Troubles that he and his friends will learn to deal with and rectify.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For $3.99 you can get this 2nd book in the fantasy adventure series of Humphrey and Gwendolyn.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

Amazon for your Kindle
When the neighboring kingdom of Mah Wee begins to experience the same problems that beset Torahn some years before, they urgently request the aid of the experts in containing a new Troll infestation. But eradicating Trolls is not as easy as exterminating a few rats or mice. Trolls are bigger than men, they are stronger than men, and then are meaner than men. Humphrey Cutter and his band of mismatched warriors must once again rise to the occasion, but can they without the aid of expertise of Gwendolyn and her particular skills?

   Mah Wee, an ancient kingdom, with a monarch more steeped in the rights of being a king rather than the obligations and duties that a king should be. Here Humphrey and his crew finds that they have more than Trolls to overcome if they are to save Mah Wee from the same or nearly similar problems that they faced before in Torahn. But, as Humphrey knows, nothing can truly be accomplished if the lovely Gwendolyn is not able to lend her aid as well.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Tyrone Power
1795-March 17 1841

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William Grattan Tyrone Power was born in Kilmacthoma, County Waterford, Ireland. His father was Tyrone Power as well. He is achieved fame was an actor and manager and purchased the land that would later become Madison Square Garden in New York just before he died at sea on the SS President. (The lawyer who had the papers disappeared so the Power family could not claim the property.)

He was well known for acting in Irish themed plays, like King O’Neil, St. Patrick’s Eve, Rory O’More, The White Horse of the Peppers, The Groves of Blarney, Charles O’Malley, His Last Legs, and The Irish Attorney. It is thought that he wanted to use these performances to show that an Irishman was not the stereotype that so many associated such. He married Anne, the daughter of John Gilbert Esq. of the Isle of Wight and they had six children. Many of his descendants went on to notable careers. One is the famous movie star, Tyrone Power.

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Power as the Character of Major O’Dogherty in the Drama of St. Patrick’s Eve

Works

  • Born to Good Luck: or the Irishman’s Fortune. A farce in two acts. Adapted from “False and True”.
  • How to Pay the Rent; a farce, in one act [and in prose]
  • St. Patrick’s Eve; or the Order of the Day. A drama in three acts [and in prose]
  • The Lost Heir and The Prediction (1830)
  • The King’s Secret (1831)
  • The Gipsy of the Abruzzo. (1831)
  • Impressions of America, during the years 1833, 1834 and 1835. (1836)

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The End of the World
This is the first of the Regency Romances I published. It is available for sale and I hope that you will take the opportunity to order your copy for the holiday season. For yourself or as a gift.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For $7.99 you can get this Regency Romance for your eReader. A little more as an actual physical book.

Screenshot12%25253A2%25253A129%25253A57AM-2013-02-26-07-33.jpeg

Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

iBookstore

Amazon for your Kindle and as a Trade Paperback
Hermione Merwyn leads a pleasant, quiet life with her father, in the farthest corner of England. All is as it should be, though change is sure to come.  For she and her sister have reached the age of marriage, but that can be no great adventure when life at home has already been so bountiful.

When Samuel Lynchhammer arrives in Cornwall, having journeyed the width of the country, he is down to his last few quid and needs to find work for his keep. Spurned by the most successful mine owner in the county, Gavin Tadcaster, Samuel finds work for Gavin’s adversary, Sir Lawrence Merwyn.

Can working for Sir Lawrence, the father of two young women on the cusp of their first season to far away London, be what Samuel needs to help him resolve the reasons for his running away from his obligations in the east of the country? Will the daughters be able to find happiness in the desolate landscapes and deadly mines of their home?

When a stranger arrives in Cornwall while the war rages on the Peninsula, is he the answer to one’s prayers, or a nightmare wearing the disguise of a gentleman?

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If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Thomas Fowell Buxton
April 7 1786-February 19 1845

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Buxton was born at Castle Hedingham, Essex. His mother was a Quaker an he became friends with Joseph John Gurney, and Gurney’s sister Elizabeth Fry. Buxton then married their sister Hannah in May of 1807.

In 1808 his family connections got him work at the Brewery of Truman, Hanbury & Company in Spitalfields London. (His mother was a Hanbury.) In 1811 he was made a partner in the business and Buxton was added to the firm name. Later he would become sole owner.

He was COE but he attended Friends meetings with his wife’s family. He became involved in the social reform movement. He raised money for the weavers who were facing poverty from modernization, and he supported his sister-in-laws work on prison reform with financial support. He was elected to Parliament for Weymouth and Melcombe Regis in 1818. He supported Elizabeth Fry now in Parliament in her work and also for the Abolition of Slavery helping another Sister-in-law, Louisa Gurney Hoare. He had eight children with Hannah, losing four in a five week period to whooping cough.

While the Slave Trade had been abolished in 1807, Slavery still existed. Buxton was a founder of the Society for the Mitigation and Gradual Abolition of Slavery, later the Anti-Slavey Society, in 1823. He took over the role that William Wilberforce had played when Wilberforce retired.

Buxton also was the founding chairman of the Royal Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Slavery was abolished in 1833, and Buxton remained in Parliament until 1837. Following the abolishment in the British Empire, Buxton turned his sights to abolishing Slavery in the world and urged the government to work towards those ends.

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The Anti-Slavery Society Convention, 1840 by Benjamin Robert Haydon

David Livingstone followed Buxtons philosophy on this and promoted legitimate trade to replace the slave trade. Buxton became a missionary in Africa in support of his cause. In 1840 Buxton was made a Baronet, but his health was failing, possibly due to the African expedition. He died in 1845 and there is a monument to him in Westminster Abbey.

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