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Archive for July, 2012

Now that the Lexicon is finished for a time, I am back at work on the Timelines, which you can find house

TheRegencyEraTimeline-2012-07-30-10-54.jpg

And should you think that I have gone silent, such is not the case. I have about a third of 1800 finished, giving you a glimpse now of this:

1800 1800
Year Month Day Event
1800 Jan 7 Millard Fillmore, 13th US president (1850-1853), was born in Summerhill (Locke), N.Y.
1800 Jan 8 Victor of Aveyron (~1785-1828), a feral child, emerged from French forests on his own. In 1797 he had been found wandering the woods near Saint-Sernin-sur-Rance, France, and was captured, but soon escaped. He was later  portrayed in the 1969 movie, The Wild Child (L’Enfant sauvage), by François Truffaut.
1800 Jan 10 The US Senate ratified a peace treaty with Tunis.
1800 Jan 20 Carolina, the sister of Napoleon I, married King Joachim Murat of Naples.
1800 Jan 23 Edward Rutledge (50), US attorney (signed Declaration of Independence), died.
1800 Jan 24 Edwin Chadwick, British social reformer, was born.
1800 Jan 30 US population was reported at 5,308,483; Black population 1,002,037 (18.9%).
1800 Jan Pierre Samuel du Pont de Nemours, his two sons and their families, arrived in Newport, Rhode Island, from France.
1800 Jan Lord Elgin established his British embassy in Constantinople. His orders were to open the borders for trade, obtain entry for British ships to the Black Sea and to secure an alliance against French military expeditions in the eastern Mediterranean.
1800 Feb 11 William Henry Fox Talbot (d.1877), British inventor and pioneer in instantaneous photography, was born.
1800 Mar 14 James Bogardus, US inventor, builder (made cast-iron buildings), was born.
1800 Mar 17 English warship Queen Charlotte caught fire and 700 people died.
1800 Mar 20 French army defeated Turks at Heliopolis, Turkey, and advanced to Cairo.
1800 Apr 2 1st performance of Ludwig van Beethoven’s 1st Symphony in C.
1800 Apr 15 Sir James Clark Ross, Scottish explorer, was born. He located the Magnetic North Pole.
1800 Apr 16 George Charles Bingham, British soldier, was born. He commanded the Light Brigade during its famous charge.
1800 Apr 24 US Congress approved a bill establishing the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. with a $5,000 allocation.
1800 April April: Beethoven premiers his Symphony No. 1 in C major in Vienna.
1800 April April: English poet William Cowper dies at age 68 .
1800 May 5 Louis Hachette, French publisher (Librairie Hachette), was born.
1800 May 7 US Congress divided the Northwest Territory into two parts, and Indiana, the latter out of the western portion, including Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana and parts of Michigan and Minnesota. The provisions of the Treaty of Paris (1783) which ended the Revolutionary War, had defined the borders of the US. Among other concessions, Great Britain agreed to a line through the Great Lakes that placed in US control the territory called the Old Northwest, between the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. States that had previously laid claim to parts of the region ceded their territories in anticipation of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787.
1800 May 7 Niccolo  Piccinni (72), Italian composer (Roland), died.
1800 May 9 John Brown, American abolitionist, was born. His adventures came to an end at Harper’s Ferry, where he tried to start a revolution against slavery.
1800 May 14 Friedrich von Schiller’s “Macbeth,” premiered in Weimar
1800 May 15 King George III survived a 2nd assassination attempt.
1800 May 19 French Bosbeeck, veterinarian, robber, was hanged.
1800 May May: “The Masquerade given at the King’s Theatre, on the 1st instant, was numerously attended. Among the several characters, a Quack Doctor was most conspicuous – a Sylvester Daggerwood who had an infinite deal of nothing to say — Sailors, Countrymen, Chimney Sweepers, Flower Girls, Gipsies, a Tommy Tonsor, a band of Mrs. Montagu’s friends, a Rolla, who tore his fine speeches, full of logic and grammar, and a great number of Harlequins and Clowns, the former sans agility, the latter sans humor, filled up the scene. The supper was the best by far that has of late been given upon such an occasion, and the company was truly respectable. We cannot conclude this brief account without expressing our disapprobation of the indecent custom of men habiting themselves like women. The conduct of some persons of this description, during the evening, disgusted the greater part of the assembly; but at length some gentlemen, much to their credit, actually compelled them to retire from the merry scene.”- The Sporting Magazine
1800 May May: An assissination attempt is made on George III at Drury Lane Theatre.
1800 May May: Napoleon crosses the Alps and invades Italy.
1800 May-Dec US presidential elections were held over this period. On Dec 3 state electors met and cast their ballots and a tie resulted between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr.
1800 Jun 4 The US White House was completed and President & Mrs. John Adams moved in. [see Nov 1]
1800 Jun 14 French General Napoleon Bonaparte pushed the forces of Austria out of Italy in the Battle of Marengo. In 2007 the sword he wore was auctioned off for over $6.4 million.
1800 Jun 14 Jean-Baptiste Kleber (47), French general, architect, was murdered.
1800 June June: Napoleon drives the Austrians from Italy (which they had conquered while he was busy in Egypt) in the Battle of Marengo.
1800 June The new city of Washington in the District of Columbia became the US capital, succeeding Philadelphia. This occurred when government departments began to move into their new buildings on land ceded to the federal government by Maryland and Virginia. The radial design of the city was created by the French architect Pierre Charles L’Enfant. Construction had begun in 1791 but was delayed following L’Enfant’s dismissal in 1792. The first Congress to sit in Washington convened on Nov. 17, 1800. The first president to live in the executive mansion, John Adams moved in also in November. The first president to be inaugurated there, Thomas Jefferson was sworn into office March 4 1801. The US was the first modern nation to design a city exclusively as a capital.
1800 Jul 6 The Sultan of Constantinople at the behest of Lord Elgin issued written orders to his officers in Athens for cooperation with Giovanni Lusieri and the removal of sculptures from the Parthenon.
1800 Jul 8 Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse gave the 1st cowpox vaccination to his son to prevent smallpox. [see May 14, 1796]
1800 Aug 21 The US Marine Band gave its first concert near the future site of the Lincoln Memorial.
1800 Sep 6 Catherine Esther Beecher, educator who promoted higher education for women, was born in East Hampton, Long Island, NY.
1800 Sep 7 The NYC Zion AME Church was dedicated.
1800 Sep 23 William Holmes McGuffey, educator, was born. He is famous for his book “Eclectic Readers” (McGuffey Readers).
1800 September September: At the invitation of the Maltese, British troops liberate the Islands of Malta and Gozo from the French.
1800 September Cayuga Bridge, an engineering marvel of its time, was completed. It crossed the northern end of Cayuga Lake and the Montezuma Swamp in west central New York. The bridge, one and one-eighth of a mile long, was built of wood and was wide enough for wagons to pass abreast. Stages of the Genesee Turnpike used it, as did American troops in the War of 1812 on their way to the Niagara frontier. The bridge cot $150,000. It was financed by a loan from the Manhattan Company of New York City, which was founded in 1799 by Aaron Burr. Ostensibly established as a water supply company, the Manhattan Company had a charter broad enough so that it could function as a bank.
1800 Oct 1 Spain ceded Louisiana to France in a secret treaty.
1800 Oct 2 Nat Turner, slave and the property of Benjamin Turner, was born in Southampton county, Va. He was sold in 1831 to Joseph Travis from Jerusalem, Southampton county, Va.
1800 Oct 3 George Bancroft, historian, known as the “Father of American History” for his 10-volume A History of the United States, was born.
1800 Oct 7 Gabriel, slave revolt leader in Virginia, was hanged. Gabriel Prosser had mounted a slave rebellion.
1800 Oct 25 Thomas Babington Macaulay (d.1859), England, poet and historian, was born. “No particular man is necessary to the state. We may depend on it that, if we provide the country with popular institutions, those institutions will provide it with great men.”
1800 Oct 26 Helmuth Karl von Moltke, Prussian Field Marshal and Count, was born. His reorganization of the Prussian Army led to military victories that allowed the unification of Germany. His father was a German officer serving in the Danish army. His greatest innovation was the creation of a fighting force that could mobilize quickly and strike when and where it chose. He was one of the first generals to grasp the importance of railroads in moving troops. In 1995 Otto Friedrich authored a biography of the Moltke family line from Bismarck to Hitler: “Blood and Iron: From Bismarck to Hitler the von Moltke Family’s Impact on German History.”
1800 Nov 1 John and Abigail Adams moved into “the President’s House” in Washington DC. It became known as the White House during the Roosevelt administration.
1800 Nov 17 The Sixth Congress (2nd session) convened for the first time in Washington, DC, in the partially completed Capitol building. Previously, the federal capital had briefly been in  other cities, including New York, Philadelphia, and Annapolis, Maryland. George Washington- a surveyor by profession- had been assigned to find a site for a capital city somewhere along the upper Potomac River, which flows between Maryland and Virginia. Apparently expecting to become president, Washington sited the capital at the southernmost possible point, the closest commute from Mount Vernon, despite the fact that this placed the city in a swamp called Foggy Bottom.
1800 Nov 24 Weber’s opera “Das Waldmadchen,” premiered in Freiburg.
1800 Dec 2 John Brown (d.1859), US abolitionist, was born. He was hanged for murder in the Harper’s Ferry Incident in 1859. John Brown led the raid on the Federal Arsenal at Harper’s Ferry. The incident is the backdrop for George MacDonald Fraser’s novel “Flashman and the Angel of the Lord.”
1800 Dec 3 Austrians were defeated by the French at the Battle of Hohenlinden, near Munich.
1800 Dec 3 US state electors met and cast their ballots for the presidency. A tie resulted between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr.
1800 Dec 12 Washington DC was established as the capital of US.
1800 Dec 29 Charles Goodyear (d.1860), inventor of vulcanized rubber for tires, was born.
1800 Dec In Virginia Martha Washington set all her slaves free.
1800 December December: Peace negotiations between France and Austria break down, and Napoleon sends General Moreau into Austria, where he is victorious at the Battle of Hohenlinden.
1800 December December: Washington, DC is officially established as the capital of the United States.
1800 A new edition of Lyrical Ballads is published, with a Preface by William Wordsworth (expanded in the 1802 edition) that stands as a Romantic manifesto on the nature of poetry.
1800 Jacques Louis David paints his famous Portrait of Mme. Récamier.
1800 London’s Royal College of Surgeons is founded.
1800 Maria Edgeworth’s Castle Rackrent is published.
1800 In a secret treaty with Spain, the Treaty of San Ildefonso, France regains Louisiana. 
1800 England’s population, around 5.25 million in 1720, has increased to around 9 million. World population has risen from between 600 and 680 million in 1700 to one billion, roughly calculated. The most populous cities in 1800 are: Guangzhou, China: 1.5 million.
Hangchow, China: 1,000,000
Kingtehchen, China: 1,000,000 
NanJing, China: 1,000,000
Edo (Tokyo), Japan 1,000,000 
London, England: 865,000
Beijing, China: 700,000
Constantinople (Istanbul), Turkey: 598,000
Paris, France: 548,000
Kyoto, Japan:530,000
1800 Mexico City has a population of 250,000. New York City: 60,000. Population remains sparse in areas occupied by hunter-gatherers — in Africa and the plains of North America. Areas occupied by pastoral nomads are also sparse.
1800 In the US presidential elections Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr tied in electoral votes. The selection was then moved to the House of Representatives where on the 36th ballot Vermont and Maryland switch their votes to Jefferson. [see Feb 17, 1801]
1800 France Presern (d.1849), author, painter, poet, musician, mathematician and architect, was born in Slovenia. His image was later featured on Slovenia’s 1,000-tolar bills.
1800 Johann Christian Reinhart, German artist, created his work: “The History Painter, Caricature.”
1800 Friedrich Schiller wrote his drama “Mary Stuart.” The play is compressed into the last 3 days of Mary’s life.
1800 Rev. Mason L. Weems (d.1825) authored the biography “Life of Washington.”
1800 Father Demetrius Gallitzin (1770-1840), a Russian-born Catholic priest, was directed by bishop John Carroll to investigate spirits in the home (Wizard’s Clip) of Adam Livingstone in the Shenandoah Valley.
1800 Congress allocated a room in the Capitol for the US Supreme Court.
1800 The American political “revolution” brought the Republicans to office in the (sic) first peaceful transition of power between rival political parties in human history.
1800 Worcestershire sauce was a ketchup and came out about this time.
1800 Jean Baptiste Pointe du Sable, a pioneer trader and founder of the village that became Chicago, sold his holdings and moved to a Missouri farm.
1800 The population of the world doubled from what it was in 1500 to more than 800 million. The world’s population reached about 1 billion about this time. In 1927 it reached 2 billion; in 1959 3 billion; in 1987 5 billion; in 1999 6 billion and in 2011 7 billion.
1800 William Herschel (1738-1822), German-born English astronomer, detected what later became known as infra-red red light in experiments with glass prisms and thermometers.
1800 Alessandro Volta (1745-1827), Italian physicist, first demonstrated the electric pile or battery.
1800 Robert Fulton (35) tested a 20-foot model of his torpedo-armed submarine on the Seine. He made two 20-minute dives himself.
1800 John Chapman (1774-1845), Johnny Appleseed, a Swedenborgian missionary, a land speculator, a heavy drinker and an eccentric dresser, began planting orchards across western Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana from seed. (T&L, 10/1980, p.42) )(AHD, p.225)(HNQ, 1/2/01)
1800 Lieven Bauwens stole a spinning “mule jenny” machine from Britain. He had it dismantled and smuggled out in a cargo of coffee. This enabled the textile industry in Ghent, Belgium, to greatly expand. Britain sentenced Bauwens to death in absentia and Ghent made him a hero.
1800 Mary Robinson (42/43), writer, actress, courtesan and fashion icon, died. In 2005 Sarah Gristwood authored “Perdita: Royal Mistress, Writer and Romantic.” Paula Byrne authored Perdita: The Literary, Theatrical, Scandalous Life of Mary Robinson.”
1800 The Parliament in Westminster passed an Act of Union formally binding Ireland with England and abolished the Irish parliament. The Act of Union entailed the loss of legislative independence of the Irish Parliament.
1800 The French regained the territory of Louisiana from Spain by the secret Treaty of Ildefenso.
1800 Dessalines, a lieutenant of Haitian rebel leader Toussaint L’Ouverture (Louverture),  butchered many mulattoes (the estimates range from 200 to 10,000).
1800 The Althing of Iceland was abolished by the Danish king.
1800 About this time an Arab nomadic tribe settled in the southern Israeli desert of Negev. The Al-Sayyid community that developed there grew with a high incidence of profound deafness due to a recessive gene. The village developed a sign language in response that came to be called the Al-Sayyid Bedouin Sign Language (ABSL). In 2007 Margalit Fox authored “Signs and Wonders,” which told the Al-Sayyid story as part of a history of linguistics and sign language in American and the world.
1800 Ito Jakuchu (b.1716), Japanese painter based in Kyoto, died.
1800 In Sweden Count Balthazar Von Platen started the Gut Canal.
1800 Many Bantu people from Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania were taken from their homes and sold as slaves in Somalia.
1800-1861 This period was covered by Nicholas E. Tawa in his 2000 book: “High-Minded and Low-Down: Music in the Lives of Americans, 1800-1861.”
1800-1900 Charles M. Russell, 19th century American landscape painter. In 2001 his painting “A Disputed Trail” sold for $2.4 million.
1800-1900 In the 1990s Claude Rawson wrote Vol. 4 of “The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism: The Eighteenth Century.”
1800-1900 In California floods turned the Central Valley into a lake 700 miles long.
1800-1900 Sir David Brewster, 19th cent. Scottish scientist, inventor of the kaleidoscope.
1800-1900 J.H. Salisbury was a 19th century English dietician who recommended a diet of ground steak for a variety of ailments including pernicious anemia, tuberculosis and hardening of the arteries. His name gave rise to “Salisbury steak.”
1800-1900 19th century Tokyo was called Edo and served as the shogun’s power seat.
1800-1900 In what later became Pakistan feudal families came to power when the British made weak vassals into a hereditary land-owning elite loyal to London.
1800-1900 In South Africa the Witwatersrand gold mines were discovered, the largest gold reserve find in the world. The gold came from a strip of land 62 miles long and 25 miles wide and produced three-fourths of all the gold ever mined.
1800-1900 The main river channel at Hoi An, Vietnam, shifted toward Danang and made navigation by deep-draft ships difficult, and thus lost its commercial importance. A new port was built on the Han River at Da Nang.

We also have our Giveaway taking place:

For the Giveaway, see our original blog post from Saturday

I finished the Lexicon for this go round, (Found a list of Nautical terms from the period buried in my files to add for the next go round) so time for a little celebration.

For those who missed it, there are a lot of previous posts here of all the letters and you can skip back and have a look.

For this post and running through the week, the winner to be picked on Monday the 5th, I will be giving away a free eBook copy of Jane Austen and Ghosts

PastedGraphic-2012-07-30-10-54.jpg

In the world of moviemaking, nothing is as golden as rebooting a classic tale that has made fortunes every time before when it has been adapted for the silver screen. Certainly any work by Jane Austen made into a movie will not only be bankable, but also considered a work of art.

That is of course until the current wave of adaptations that unite her classic stories with all the elements of the afterlife is attempted to be created. That these have found success in the marketplace amongst booklovers may not be quite understood by those who make movies. But that they are a success is understood and a reason to make them into movies.

All that being said, perhaps it would also be fair to say that the very proper Jane, were she present to have anything to say about it, would not be pleased. Of course she has been away from this Earth for nearly 200 hundred years. But does that mean were she upset enough, she wouldn’t come back?

How to win

But to enter the contest I should like 2 things. As Jane deals with old B Horror Movie legends in Jane Austen and Ghosts, I would like you to put in the comments section here:

1) The name of a B movie legend (and please let us try not to repeat since it will be fun to see how many we can come up with. So to start off, I will give one as an example, Boris Karloff)

2) One favorite word from the Lexicon which you can see each separate letter here in the Blog by looking at the previous days posts, or go to the entire lexicon at the Regency Assembly Press website, here (Regency Lexicon)

3) (Optional) Your name of course (if you are registered and signed into WordPress then I can click back to you if you are the winner, but if you are not,) and an email or some way to get you the prize!

4) (Optional) And if you are super proactive, what eBook format you would need should you be our winner!

Read Full Post »

I finished the Lexicon for this go round, (Found a list of Nautical terms from the period buried in my files to add for the next go round) so time for a little celebration.

For those who missed it, there are a lot of previous posts here of all the letters and you can skip back and have a look.

For this post and running through the week, the winner to be picked on Monday the 5th, I will be giving away a free eBook copy of Jane Austen and Ghosts

PastedGraphic-2012-07-28-10-23.jpg

In the world of moviemaking, nothing is as golden as rebooting a classic tale that has made fortunes every time before when it has been adapted for the silver screen. Certainly any work by Jane Austen made into a movie will not only be bankable, but also considered a work of art.

That is of course until the current wave of adaptations that unite her classic stories with all the elements of the afterlife is attempted to be created. That these have found success in the marketplace amongst booklovers may not be quite understood by those who make movies. But that they are a success is understood and a reason to make them into movies.

All that being said, perhaps it would also be fair to say that the very proper Jane, were she present to have anything to say about it, would not be pleased. Of course she has been away from this Earth for nearly 200 hundred years. But does that mean were she upset enough, she wouldn’t come back?

How to win

But to enter the contest I should like 2 things. As Jane deals with old B Horror Movie legends in Jane Austen and Ghosts, I would like you to put in the comments section:

1) The name of a B movie legend (and please let us try not to repeat since it will be fun to see how many we can come up with. So to start off, I will give one as an example, Boris Karloff)

2) One favorite word from the Lexicon which you can see each separate letter here in the Blog by looking at the previous days posts, or go to the entire lexicon at the Regency Assembly Press website, here (Regency Lexicon)

3) (Optional) Your name of course (if you are registered and signed into WordPress then I can click back to you if you are the winner, but if you are not,) and an email or some way to get you the prize!

4) (Optional) And if you are super proactive, what eBook format you would need should you be our winner!

Read Full Post »

First ECO Agents book available

Those who follow me for a long time know that I also write in other fields aside from Regency Romance and the historical novels I do.

A few months ago, before the end of last year and after 2011 NaNoWriMo, (where I wrote the first draft of another Regency) I started work on a project with my younger brother Douglas (All three of my brothers are younger brothers.)

The premise, as he is now an educator but once was a full on scientist at the NHI and FBI (Very cloak and dagger chemistry.) was that with the world having become green, and more green aware every week, why not have a group of prodigies, studying at a higher learning educational facility tackle the ills that have now begun to beset the world.

So it is now released. We are trickling it out to the major online channels and through Amazon it will be available in trade paperback. Today, first, it is available at Amazon for your Kindle, or your Kindle apps.

For $5.99 you can get this collaboration between the brothers Wilkin. Or get it for every teenager you know who has access to a Kindle or Kindle app.

FrontCover-2012-07-27-09-00.jpg

ECO Agents: Save the Planet

Five young people are all that stands between a better world and corporate destruction.

Parker, Priya, JCubed, Guillermo and Jennifer are not just your average high school students. They are ECOAgents, trusted the world over with protecting the planet.

Our Earth is in trouble. Humanity has damaged our home. Billionaire scientist turned educator, Dr. Daniel Phillips-Lee, is using his vast resources to reverse this situation.

Zedadiah Carter, leader of the Earth’s most powerful company, is only getting richer, harvesting resources, with the aid of not so trustworthy employees. When the company threatens part of the world’s water supply, covering up their involvement is business as usual.

The Ecological Conservation Organization’s Academy of Higher Learning and Scientific Achievement, or simply the ECO Academy, high in the hills of Malibu, California overlooking the Pacific Ocean, is the envy of educational institutions worldwide. The teenage students of the ECO Academy, among the best and brightest the planet has to offer, have decided they cannot just watch the world self-destruct. They will meet this challenge head on as they begin to heal the planet.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

Read Full Post »

Regency Research

For well over twenty years since I first started my infatuation with the Regency Era, I have maintained a lexicon to help me decipher Georgette Heyer (follow the link to Frederica, my favorite of her books), and others. Then as I began to write in the genre in the years 2000, I put more emphasis on it.

I have seen a few others on the web, but I have not seen any as complete as the one maintained at Regency Assembly Press that I have contributed to.

Today are the letters X, Y and Z. You probably can guess what Yoked is, and if you have been following have seen how many different ways there is to say that. But do you know what Yaffling is?

With the emphasis that has been placed recently on Research RegencyResearch-2012-07-27-08-43.jpg there, with not only the Lexicon, but the Timelines, lives of the Prime Ministers, Dance Instruction and Regency Era Money, it is a growing resource for all Regency readers and writers. I urge everyone to have a look as it continues to grow.

I also provide here the next letter of the alphabet to entice you to visit that page. Or even bookmark it for when you need to look up a particular Regency term.

  • Xantippe–The name of Socrates’s wife: now used to signify a shrew or scolding wife.
  • Yaffling–Eating–(Cant)
  • To Yam–To eat or stuff heartily.
  • Yankey, or Yankey Doodle–A booby, or country lout: a name given to the New England men in North America–A general appellation for an American.
  • Yard Of Tin–The horn, generally a yard or so long, used by the guard of a mail coach or stage coach to warn of approach and departure.
  • Yarmouth Capon–A red herring: Yarmouth is a famous place for curing herrings.
  • Yarmouth Coach–A kind of low two-wheeled cart drawn by one horse, not much unlike an Irish car.
  • Yarmouth Pye–A pye made of herrings highly spiced, which the city of Norwich is by charter bound to present annually to the king.
  • Yarum–Milk–(Cant)
  • Yea and Nay Man–A quaker, a simple fellow, one who can only answer yes, or no.
  • Yellow–To look yellow; to be jealous–I happened to call on Mr–Green, who was out: on coming home, and finding me with his wife, he began to look confounded blue, and was, I thought, a little yellow.
  • Yellow Belly–A native of the Fens of Licoinshire; an allusion to the eels caught there.
  • Yellow Boy–1 pound 1 shilling, Guinea, yellow George, (approx $2100).
  • Yellow George–1 pound 1 shilling, yellow boy, Guinea, (approx $2100).
  • To Yelp–To cry out–Yelper; a town cryer, also one apt to make great complaints on trifling occasions.
  • Yest–A contraction of yesterday.
  • Yoked–Married–A yoke; the quantum of labour performed at one spell by husbandmen, the day’s work being divided in summer into three yokes–Kentish Term.
  • Yorkshire Tyke–A Yorkshire clown–To come Yorkshire over any one; to cheat him.
  • Young One–A familiar expression of contempt for another’s ignorance, as “ah! I See you’re a young one.” How d’ye do, young one?
  • To Yowl–To cry aloud, or howl.
  • Zad–Crooked like the letter Z–He is a mere zad, or perhaps zed; a description of a very crooked or deformed person.
  • Zany–The jester, jack pudding, or merry andrew, to a mountebank.
  • Zedland–Great part of the west country, where the letter Z is substituted for S; as zee for See, zun for sun.

Read Full Post »

Regency Research

For well over twenty years since I first started my infatuation with the Regency Era, I have maintained a lexicon to help me decipher Georgette Heyer (follow the link to Frederica, my favorite of her books), and others. Then as I began to write in the genre in the years 2000, I put more emphasis on it.

I have seen a few others on the web, but I have not seen any as complete as the one maintained at Regency Assembly Press that I have contributed to.

Today is the letter W. Do you know what you’ve done when you Wyn? Or what do when Ware Hawk is cried?

With the emphasis that has been placed recently on Research RegencyResearch-2012-07-26-08-42.jpg there, with not only the Lexicon, but the Timelines, lives of the Prime Ministers, Dance Instruction and Regency Era Money, it is a growing resource for all Regency readers and writers. I urge everyone to have a look as it continues to grow.

I also provide here the next letter of the alphabet to entice you to visit that page. Or even bookmark it for when you need to look up a particular Regency term.

  • Wabler–Footwabler; a contemptuous Term for a foot soldier, frequently used by those of the cavalry.
  • To Waddle–To go like a duck–To waddle out of Change alley as a lame duck; a Term for one who has not been able to pay his gaming debts, called his differences, on the Stock Exchange, and therefore absents himself from it.
  • Wag–An arch-frolicsome fellow.
  • Waggish–Arch, gamesome, frolicsome.
  • Wagtail–A lewd woman.
  • Waits–Musicians of the lower order, who in most towns play under the windows of the chief inhabitants at midnight, a short time before Christmas, for which they collect a christmas-box from house to house–They are said to derive their name of waits from being always in waiting to celebrate weddings and other joyous events happening within their district.
  • Wake–A country feast, commonly on the anniversary of the tutelar saint of the village, that is, the saint to whom the parish church is dedicated–Also a custom of watching the dead, called Late Wake, in use both in Ireland and Wales, where the corpse being deposited under a table, with a plate of salt on its breast, the table is covered with liquor of all sorts; and the guests, particularly, the younger part of them, amuse themselves with all kinds of pastimes and recreations: the consequence is generally more than replacing the departed friend.
  • Walking Cornet–An ensign of foot.
  • Walking Poulterer–One who steals fowls, and hawks them from door to door.
  • Walking Stationer–A hawker of pamphlets, &c.
  • Walking the Plank–A mode of destroying devoted persons or officers in a mutiny or ship-board, by blindfolding them, and obliging them to walk on a plank laid over the ship’s side; by this means, as the mutineers suppose, avoiding the penalty of murder.
  • Walking Up Against the Wall–To run up a score, which in alehouses is commonly recorded with chalk on the walls of the bar.
  • Wall–To walk or crawl up the wall; to be scored up at a public-nouse–Wall-eyed, having an eye with little or no sight, all white like a plaistered wall.
  • Waltz–The waltz was considered somewhat shocking because of the contact maintained between the partners when it was introduced in England, but it soon became quite popular–A lady required the consent of one of the Patronesses of Almack’s for her first waltz–Note, that while practiced privately by the very elite of the Ton, it was not done in public until 1814 and the visit of the Tsar.
  • Want To Pull Caps With Someone–Want to argue with them.
  • Wanton–Woman of easy virtue.
  • To Wap–To copulate, to beat–If she wont wap for a winne, let her trine for a make; if she won’t lie with a man for a penny, let her hang for a halfpenny–Mort wap-apace; a woman of experience, or very expert at the sport.
  • Wapper-Eyed–Sore-eyed.
  • Ware–A woman’s ware; her commodity.
  • Ware Hawk–An exclamation used by thieves to inform their confederates that some police officers are at hand.
  • Warm–Rich, in good circumstances–To warm, or give a man a warming; to beat him–See Chafed.
  • Warming-Pan–A large old-fashioned watch–A Scotch warming-pan; a female bedfellow.
  • Warren–One that is security for goods taken up on credit by extravagant young gentlemen–Cunny warren; a girl’s boarding-school, also a bawdy-house.
  • Wash–Paint for the face, or cosmetic water–Hog-wash; thick and bad beer.
  • Wasp–An infected prostitute, who like a wasp carries a sting in her tail.
  • Waspish–Peevish, spiteful.
  • Waste–House of waste; a tavern or alehouse, where idle people waste both their time and money.
  • Watch, Chain, and Seals–A sheep’s head And pluck.
  • Watch Fob–A short chain or ribbon with an attached medallion or ornament that connected to a man’s pocketwatch and hung from a small pocket in his waistcoat–
  • Water-Mill–A woman’s private parts.
  • Water Sneaksman–A man who steals from ships or craft on the river.
  • Water–His chops watered at it; he longed earnestly for it–To watch his waters; to keep a strict watch on any one’s actions–In hot water: in trouble, engaged in disputes.
  • Water Bewitched–Very weak punch or beer.
  • Waterpad–One that robs ships in the river Thames.
  • Watery-Headd–Apt to shed tears.
  • Water Scriger–A doctor who prescribes from inspecting the water of his patients–See Piss Prophet.
  • Waters – Taking The Waters–The waters in spa towns such as Tunbridge Wells and most notably Bath were thought to have healing powers, so to “take the waters” means to either drink or bathe in these mineral waters.
  • Wattles–Ears–(Cant)
  • Wear Arse–A one-horse chaise.
  • Wear The Willow–To mourn the loss of a love or to be lovelorn–The willow tree is associated with sorrow, e.g.: weeping willow–Willow garlands were symbols of being forsaken in love.
  • Well-Inlaid–Rich.
  • Weasal-Faced–Thin, meagre-faced–Weasel-gutted; thin-bodied; a weasel is a thin long slender animal with a sharp face.
  • Wedding–The emptying of a neoessary-hovise, particularly in London–You have been at an Irish wedding, where black eyes are given instead of favours; saying to one who has a black eye.
  • Wedge–Silver plate, because melted by the receivers of stolen goods into wedges–(Cant)
  • To Weed–To take a part–The kiddey weeded the swell’s screens; the youth took some of the gentleman’s bank notes.
  • Weeping Cross–To come home by weeping cross; to repent.
  • Welch Comb–The thumb and four fingers.
  • Welch Fiddle–The itch–See Scotch Fiddle.
  • Welch Mile–Like a Welch mile, long and narrow–His story is like a Welch mile, long and tedious.
  • Welch Rabbit, [i.e–a Welch rare-bit] Bread and cheese toasted–See Rabbit.—The Welch are said to be so remarkably fond of cheese, that in cases of difficulty their midwives apply a piece of toasted cheese to the janua vita to attract and entice the young Taffy, who on smelling it makes most vigorous efforts to come forth.
  • Welch Ejectment–To unroof the house, a method practiced by landlords in Wales to eject a bad tenant.
  • To Well–To divide unfairly–To conceal part–A cant phrase used by thieves, where one of the party conceals some of the booty, instead of dividing it fairly amongst his confederates.
  • Well-Hung–The blowen was nutts upon the kiddey because he is well-hung; the girl is pleased with the youth because his genitals are large.
  • Weston–A popular gentleman’s tailor.
  • Westminster Wedding–A match between a whore and a rogue.
  • Wet Parson–One who moistens his clay freely, in order to make it stick together.
  • Wet Quacker–One of that sect who has no objection to the spirit derived from wine.
  • Whack–A share of a booty obtained by fraud–A paddy whack; a stout brawney Irishman.
  • Whapper–A large man or woman.
  • Wheedle–A sharper–To cut a wheedle; to decoy by fawning or insinuation–(Cant)
  • Wheelband in the Nick–Regular drinking over the left thumb.
  • Whelp–An impudent whelp; a saucy boy.
  • Whereas–To follow a whereas; to become a bankrupt, to figure among princes and potentates: the notice given in the Gazette that a commission of bankruptcy is issued out against any trader, always beginning with the word whereas–He will soon march in the rear of a whereas.
  • Whet–A morning’s draught, commonly white wine, supposed to whet or sharpen the appetite.
  • Whetstone’s Park–A lane between Holborn and Lincoln’s-inn Fields, formerly famed for being the resort of women of the town.
  • Whids–Words–(Cant)
  • To Whiddle–To tell or discover–He whiddles; he peaches–He whiddles the whole scrap; he discovers all he knows–The cull whiddled because they would not tip him a snack: the fellow peached because they would not give him a share, They whiddle beef, and we must brush; they cry out thieves, and we must make off–(Cant)
  • Whiddler–An informer, or one that betrays the secrets of the gang.
  • Whiffles–A relaxation of the scrotum.
  • Whifflers–Ancient name for fifers; also persons at the universities who examine candidates for degrees–A whiffling cur, a small yelping cur.
  • Whig–The party opposed to the conservative Tories–Led by Charles James Fox and wanting constitutional monarchy–Whig was originally short for ‘whiggamor’.
  • Whimper, or Whindle–A low cry.
  • To Whine–To complain.
  • Whinyard–A sword.
  • Whip–A coachman.
  • To Whip the Cock–A piece of sport practised at wakes, horse-races, and fairs in Leicestershire: a cock being tied or fastened into a hat or basket, half a dozen carters blindfolded, and armed with their cart whips, are placed round it, who, after being turned thrice about, begin to whip the cock, which if any one strikes so as to make it cry out, it becomes his property; the joke is, that instead of whipping the cock they flog each other heartily.
  • Whip Jacks–The tenth order of the canting crew, rogues who having learned a few Sea Terms, beg with counterfeit passes, pretending to be sailors shipwrecked on the neighbouring coast, and on their way to the port from whence they sailed.
  • To Whip Off–To run away, to drink off greedily, to snatch–He whipped away from home, went to the alehouse, where he whipped off a full tankard, and coming back whipped off a fellow’s hat from his head.
  • Whip-Belly Vengeance–or pinch-gut vengeance, of which he that gets the most has the worst share–Weak or sour beer.
  • Whipper-Snapper–A diminutive fellow.
  • Whipshire–Yorkshire.
  • Whipster–A sharp or subtle fellow.
  • Whipt Syllabub–A flimsy, frothy discourse or treatise, without solidity.
  • Whirlygigs–Testicles.
  • Whisker–A great lie.
  • Whisker Splitter–A man of intrigue.
  • Whiskin–A shallow brown drinking bowl.
  • Whisky–A malt spirit much drank in Ireland and Scotland; also a one-horse chaise–See Tim Whisky.
  • Whist–A card game somewhat like bridge for two players.
  • Whistle–The throat–To wet one’s whistle; to drink.
  • Whistling Shop–Rooms in the King’s Bench and Fleet prison where drams are privately sold.
  • Whit–[i.e–Whittington’s.] Newgate–(Cant)—Five rum-padders are rubbed in the darkmans out of the whit, and are piked into the deuseaville; five highwaymen broke out of Newgate in the night, and are gone into the country.
  • White Ribbin–Gin.
  • White Feather–He has a white feather; he is a coward; an allusion to a game cock, where having a white leather is a proof he is not of the true game breed.
  • White-Livered–Cowardly, malicious.
  • White Lie–A harmless lie, one not told with a malicious intent, a lie told to reconcile people at variance.
  • White Serjeant–A man fetched from the tavern or ale-house by his wife, is said to be arrested by the white serjeant.
  • White Swelling–A woman big with child is said to have a white swelling.
  • White Tape–Geneva.
  • White Wool–Geneva.
  • Whitechapel–Whitechapel portion; two smocks, and what nature gave–Whitechapel breed; fat, ragged, and saucy: See St–Giles’s Breed–Whitechapel beau; one who dresses with a needle and thread, and undresses with a knife–To play at whist Whitechapel fashion; i.e–aces and kings first.
  • Whitewashed–One who has taken the benefit of an act of insolvency, to defraud his creditors, is said to have been whitewashed.
  • Whitfielite–A follower of George Whitfield, a Methodist.
  • Whither-Go-YYeE–A wife: wives being sometimes apt to question their husbands whither they are going.
  • Whittington’s College–Newgate; built or repaired by the famous lord mayor of that name.
  • Whore’s Bird–A debauched fellow, the largest of all birds–He sings more like a whore’s bird than a canary bird; said of one who has a strong manly voice.
  • Whore’s Curse–A piece of gold coin, value five shillings and three pence, frequently given to women of the town by such as professed always to give gold, and who before the introduction of those pieces always gave half a guinea.
  • Whore’s Kitling, or Whore’s son–A bastard.
  • Whore-Monger–A man that keeps more than one mistress–A country gentleman, who kept a female friend, being reproved by the parson of the parish, and styled a whore-monger, asked the parson whether he had a cheese in his house; and being answered in the affirmative, ‘Pray,’ says he, ‘does that one cheese make you a cheese-monger?’
  • Whore Pipe–The penis.
  • Whow Ball–A milk-maid: from their frequent use of the word whow, to make the cow stand still in milking–Ball is the supposed name of the cow.
  • Wibble–Bad drink.
  • Wibling’s Witch–The four of clubs: from one James Wibling, who in the reign of King James I–grew rich by private gaming, and was commonly observed to have that card, and never to lose a game but when he had it not.
  • Wicket–A casement; also a little door.
  • Widow’s Weeds–Mourning clothes of a peculiar fashion, denoting her state–A grass widow; a discarded mistress–a widow bewitched; a woman whose husband is abroad, and said, but not certainly known, to be dead.
  • Wife–A fetter fixed to one leg.
  • Wife in Water Colours–A mistress, or concubine; water colours being, like their engagements, easily effaced, or dissolved.
  • Wigannowns–A man wearing a large wig.
  • Wigsby–Wigsby; a man wearing a wig.
  • Wild Rogues–Rogues trained up to stealing from their cradles.
  • Wild Squirt–A looseness.
  • Wild-Goose Chase–A tedious uncertain pursuit, like the following a flock of wild geese, who are remarkably shy.
  • Willing Tit–A free horse, or a coming girl.
  • Willow–Poor, and of no reputation–To wear the willow; to be abandoned by a lover or mistress.
  • Win–A penny,
  • To Win–To steal–The cull has won a couple of Rum glimsticks; the fellow has stolen a pair of fine candlesticks.
  • Wind–To raise the wind; to procure mony.
  • Winder–Transportation for life–The blowen has napped a winder for a lift; the wench is transported for life for stealing in a shop.
  • Wind-Mill–The fundament–She has no fortune but her mills; i.e–she has nothing but her **** and arse.
  • Windfall–A legacy, or any accidental accession of property.
  • Windmills in the Head–Foolish projects.
  • Windmill Dwindled To A Nutshell–To lose one’s money.
  • Window Peeper–A collector of the window tax.
  • Windward Passage–One who uses or navigates the windward passage; a sodomite.
  • Windy–Foolish–A windy fellow; a simple fellow.
  • Winged–Injured in the arm, usually the shoulder.
  • Wink–To tip one the wink; to give a signal by winking the eye.
  • Winnings–Plunder, goods, or money acquired by theft.
  • Winter Cricket–A taylor.
  • Winter’s Day–He is like a winter’s day, short and dirty.
  • Wipe–A blow, or reproach–I’ll give you a wipe on the chops–That story gave him a fine wipe–Also a handkerchief.
  • Wiper–A handkerchief–(Cant)
  • Wiper Drawer–A pickpocket, one who steals handkerchiefs–He drew a broad, narrow, cam, or specked wiper; he picked a pocket of a broad, narrow, cambrick, or coloured handkerchief.
  • To Wiredraw–To lengthen out or extend any book, letter, or discourse.
  • Wise–As wise as Waltham’s calf, that ran nine miles to suck a bull.
  • Wise men of Gotham–Gotham is a village in Nottinghamshire; its magistrates are said to have attempted to hedge in a cuckow; a bush, called the cuckow’s bush, is still shewn in support of the tradition–A thousand other ridiculous stories are told of the men of Gotham.
  • Wiseacre–A foolish conceited fellow.
  • Wiseacre’s Hall–Gresham college.
  • Wish Someone At Jericho–Find them in the way.
  • Wit–He has as much wit as three folks, two fools and a madman.
  • Witches–Silver–Witcher bubber; a silver bowl–Witcher tilter; a silver-hilted sword–Witcher cully; a silversmith.
  • Within Ames-Ace–Near.
  • To Wobble–To boil–Pot wobbler; one who boils a pot.
  • Wolf in the Breast–An extraordinary mode of imposition, sometimes practised in the country by strolling women, who have the knack of counterfeiting extreme pain, pretending to have a small animal called a wolf in their breasts, which is continually gnawing them.
  • Wolf in the Stomach–A monstrous or canine appetite.
  • Wood–In a wood; bewildered, in a maze, in a peck of troubles, puzzled, or at a loss what course to take in any business–To look over the wood; to ascend the pulpit, to preach: I shall look over the wood at St–James’s on Sunday next–To look through the wood; to stand in the pillory–Up to the arms in wood; in the pillory.
  • Wood Pecker–A bystander, who bets whilst another plays.
  • Woodcock–A taylor with a long bill.
  • Wooden Habeas–A coffin–A man who dies in prison is said to go out with a wooden habeas–He went out with a wooden habeas; i.e–his coffin.
  • Wooden Spoon–(Cambridge.) The last junior optime–See Wrangler, Optime.
  • Wooden Horse–To fide the wooden horse was a military punishment formerly in use–This horse consisted of two or more planks about eight feet long, fixed together so as to form a sharp ridge or angle, which answered to the body of the horse–It was supported by four posts, about six feet long, for legs–A head, neck, and tail, rudely cut in wood, were added, which completed the appearance of a horse–On this sharp ridge delinquents were mounted, with their hands tied behind them; and to steady them (as it was said), and lest the horse should kick them off, one or more firelocks were tied to each leg–In this situation they were sometimes condemned to sit an hour or two; but at length it having been found to injure the soldiers materially, and sometimes to rupture them, it was left off about the time of the accession of King George I–A wooden horse was standing in the Parade at Portsmouth as late as the year 1750.
  • Wooden Ruff–The pillory–See Norway Neckcloth.
  • Wooden Surtout–A coilin.
  • Woman of the Town, or Woman of Pleasure–A prostitute.
  • Woman and her Husband–A married couple, where the woman is bigger than her husband.
  • Woman’s Conscience–Never satisfied.
  • Woman of all Work–Sometimes applied to a female servant, who refuses none of her master’s commands.
  • Woolbird–A sheep–(Cant)
  • Wool Gathering–Your wits are gone a woolgathering; saying to an absent man, one in a reverie, or absorbed in thought.
  • Woolley Crown–A soft-headed fellow.
  • Word Grubbers–Verbal critics, and also persons who use hard words in common discourse.
  • Word Pecker–A punster, one who plays upon words.
  • Word of Mouth–To drink by word of mouth, i.e–Out of the bowl or bottle instead, of a glass.
  • World–All the world and his wife; every body, a great company.
  • Worm–To worm out; to obtain the knowledge of a secret by craft, also to undermine or supplant–He is gone to the diet of worms; he is dead and buried, or gone to Rothisbone.
  • Wranglers–At Cambridge the first class (generally of twelve) at the annual examination for a degree–There are three classes of honours, wranglers, senior optimes, and junior optimes–Wranglers are said to be born with golden spoons in their mouths, the senior optimes with silver, and the junior with leaden ones–The last junior optime is called the wooden spoon–Those who are not qualified for honors are either in the Gulf (that is, meritorious, but not deserving of being in the three first classes) or among the pollot [Greek Letters] the many–See Pluck, Apostles, & C.
  • Wrap Rascal–A red cloak, called also a roquelaire.
  • Wrapt Up In Warm Flannel–Drunk with spirituous liquors–He was wrapt up in the tail of his mother’s smock; saying of any one remarkable for his success with the ladies–To be wrapt up in any one: to have a good opinion of him, or to be under his influence.
  • Wrinkle–A wrinkle-bellied whore; one who has had a number of bastards: child-bearing leaves wrinkles in a woman’s belly–To take the wrinkles out of any one’s belly; to fill it out by a hearty meal–You have one wrinkle more in your a-se; i.e–you have one piece of knowledge more than you had, every fresh piece of knowledge being supposed by the vulgar naturalists to add a wrinkle to that part.
  • Wry Mouth and a Pissen Pair of Breeches–Hanging.
  • Wry Neck Day—Hanging day.
  • Wyn–See Win.

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Regency Research

For well over twenty years since I first started my infatuation with the Regency Era, I have maintained a lexicon to help me decipher Georgette Heyer (follow the link to Frederica, my favorite of her books), and others. Then as I began to write in the genre in the years 2000, I put more emphasis on it.

I have seen a few others on the web, but I have not seen any as complete as the one maintained at Regency Assembly Press that I have contributed to.

Today is the letter V. Have you ever given your Vardy? Or do you have any idea what exactly Vessels of Paper are?

With the emphasis that has been placed recently on Research RegencyResearch-2012-07-25-08-42.jpg there, with not only the Lexicon, but the Timelines, lives of the Prime Ministers, Dance Instruction and Regency Era Money, it is a growing resource for all Regency readers and writers. I urge everyone to have a look as it continues to grow.

I also provide here the next letter of the alphabet to entice you to visit that page. Or even bookmark it for when you need to look up a particular Regency term.

  • Vagaries–Frolics, wild rambles.
  • Vail–Tips given to the servants at the manor home in which the tipper guested at.
  • Vain-Glorious, or Ostentatious Man–One who boasts without reason, or, as the canters say, pisses more than he drinks.
  • Valentine–The first woman seen by a man, or man seen by a woman, on St. Valentine’s day, the 14th of February, when it is said every bird chuses his mate for the ensuing year.
  • To Vamp–To pawn any thing. I’ll vamp it, and tip you the cole: I’ll pawn it, and give you the money. Also to refit, new dress, or rub up old hats, shoes or other wearing apparel; likewise to put new feet to old boots. Applied more particularly to a quack bookseller.
  • Vamper–Stockings.
  • Van–Madam Van; see Madam.
  • Vandyke–Named after the painter Anthony Van Dyke (1599-1641), a style of collar or trimming with a dentate (i.e–sawtooth) border in lace or fabric.
  • Van-Neck–Miss or Mrs. Van-Neck; a woman with large breasts; a bushel bubby.
  • Vardy–To give one’s vardy; i.e. verdict or opinion.
  • Varlets–Now rogues and rascals, formerly yeoman’s servants.
  • Varment–(Whip and Cambridge.) Natty, dashing. He is quite varment, he is quite the go. He sports a varment hat, coat, &c.; he is dressed like a gentleman Jehu.
  • Vaulting School–A bawdy-house; also an academy where vaulting and other manly exercises are taught.
  • Vauxhall Gardens–A pleasure garden across the Thames from fashionable London that offered a variety of entertainments including music, dancing and elaborate fireworks displays–There were also numerous dark walks suitable for assignations.
  • Velvet–To tip the velvet; to put one’s tongue into a woman’s mouth. To be upon velvet; to have the best of a bet or match. To the little gentleman in velvet, i. e. the mole that threw up the hill that caused Crop (King William’s horse) to stumble; a toast frequently drank by the tories and catholics in Ireland.
  • Venerable Monosyllable–Pudendum muliebre.
  • Venus’s Curse–The venereal disease.
  • Vessels of Paper–Half a quarter of a sheet.
  • Vicar of Bray–See Bray.
  • Vice Admiral of the Narrow Seas–A drunken man that pisses under the table into his companions’ shoes.
  • Victualling Office–The stomach.
  • Vincent’s Law–The art of cheating at cards, composed of the following associates: bankers, those who play booty; the gripe, he that betteth; and the person cheated, who is styled the vincent; the gains acquired, termage.
  • Vinegar–A name given to the person who with a whip in his hand, and a hat held before his eye, keeps the ring clear, at boxing-matches and cudgel-playing; also, in cant terms, a cloak.
  • Vingt-Et-Un–The card game known as “21” or blackjack, where the object is to take cards until one is as close as possible to 21 without going over–From the French meaning twenty-one.
  • Vixen–A termagant; also a she fox, who, when she has cubs, is remarkably fierce.
  • Vouchers–Vouchers were required to gain admittance to Almack’s Assembly Rooms–They could only be given out by one of the Patronesses.
  • To Vowel–A gamester who does not immediately pay his losings, is said to vowel the winner, by repeating the vowels I.O.U. or perhaps from giving his note for the money according to the Irish form, where the acknowledgment of the debt is expressed by the letters I.O.U. which, the sum and name of the debtor being added, is deemed a sufficient security among gentlemen.
  • Vowels–Papers indicating a debt that is owed–From the Term I.O.U.

Read Full Post »

Regency Research

For well over twenty years since I first started my infatuation with the Regency Era, I have maintained a lexicon to help me decipher Georgette Heyer (follow the link to Frederica, my favorite of her books), and others. Then as I began to write in the genre in the years 2000, I put more emphasis on it.

I have seen a few others on the web, but I have not seen any as complete as the one maintained at Regency Assembly Press that I have contributed to.

Today is the letter U. Did you know that an Ungrateful Man is a Parson? Or exactly who is an Upright Man?

With the emphasis that has been placed recently on Research RegencyResearch-2012-07-24-08-42.jpg there, with not only the Lexicon, but the Timelines, lives of the Prime Ministers, Dance Instruction and Regency Era Money, it is a growing resource for all Regency readers and writers. I urge everyone to have a look as it continues to grow.

I also provide here the next letter of the alphabet to entice you to visit that page. Or even bookmark it for when you need to look up a particular Regency term.

  • Uncle–Mine uncle’s; a necessary house. He is gone to visit his uncle; saying of one who leaves his wife soon after marriage. It likewise means a pawnbroker’s: goods pawned are frequently said to be at mine uncle’s, or laid up in lavender.
  • Understrapper–An inferior in any office, or department.
  • Under Dubber–A turnkey.
  • Under The Hatches–Without funds; in debt.
  • Unfortunate Gentlemen–The horse guards, who thus named themselves in Germany, where a general officer seeing them very awkward in bundling up their forage, asked what the devil they were; to which some of them answered, unfortunate gentlemen.
  • Unfortunate Women–Prostitutes: so termed by the virtuous and compassionate of their own sex.
  • Ungrateful Man–A parson, who at least once a week abuses his best benefactor, i.e. the devil.
  • Unguentum Aureum–A bribe.
  • Unicorn–A coach drawn by three horses. Driving Term, drive a vehicle with 3 horses, 1 in front of 2 others.
  • Unlicked Cub–A rude uncouth young fellow.
  • Unrigged–Undressed, or stripped. Unrig the drab; strip the wench.
  • Untruss–To untruss a point; to let down one’s breeches in order to ease one’s self. Breeches were formerly tied with points, which till lately were distributed to the boys every Whit Monday by the churchwardens of most of the parishes in London, under the denomination of tags: these tags were worsteds of different colours twisted up to a size somewhat thicker than packthread, and tagged at both ends with tin. Laces were at the same given to the girls.
  • Untwisted–Undone, ruined, done up.
  • Unwashed Bawdry–Rank bawdry.
  • Up To Their Gossip–To be a match for one who attempts to cheat or deceive; to be on a footing, or in the secret. I’ll be up with him; I will repay him in kind.
  • Uphills–False dice that run high. Loaded dice the roll high numbers.
  • Upper Benjamin–A great coat. (Cant)
  • Upper Orders–The highest level of society.
  • Upper Story, or Garret–Figuratively used to signify the head. His upper story or garrets are unfurnished; i.e. he is an empty or foolish fellow.
  • Upping Block–[Called in some counties a leaping stock, in others a jossing block.] Steps for mounting a horse. He sits like a toad on a jossing block; said of one who sits ungracefully on horseback.
  • Uppish–Testy, apt to take offence.
  • Upright–Go upright; a word used by shoemakers, taylors and their servants, when any money is given to make them drink, and signifies, Bring it all out in liquor, though the donor intended less, and expects change, or some of his money, to be returned. Three-penny upright. See Threepenny Upright,
  • Upright Man–An upright man signifies the chief or principal of a crew. The vilest, stoutest rogue in the pack is generally chosen to this post, and has the sole right to the first night’s lodging with the dells, who afterwards are used in common among the whole fraternity. He carries a short truncheon in his hand, which he calls his filchman, and has a larger share than ordinary in whatsoever is gotten in the society. He often travels in company with thirty or forty males and females, abram men, and others, over whom he presides arbitrarily. Sometimes the women and children who are unable to travel, or fatigued, are by turns carried in panniers by an ass, or two, or by some poor jades procured for that purpose.
  • Upstarts–Persons lately raised to honours and riches from mean stations.
  • Urchin–A child, a little fellow; also a hedgehog.
  • Urinal of the Planets–Ireland: so called from the frequent rains in that island.
  • Used Up–Killed: a military saying, originating from a message sent by the late General Guise, on the expedition at Carthagena, where he desired the commander in chief to order him some more grenadiers, for those he had were all used up.

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