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Archive for September, 2013

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Admiral Lord Hugh Seymour
29 April 1759 – 11 September 1801

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Vice-Admiral Lord Hugh Seymour

Seymour was the fifth son of Francis Seymour-Conway, 1st Marquess of Hertford and became known for being both a prominent society figure and a highly competent naval officer. He served during the American Revolutionary and French Revolutionary Wars and later in his career performed a period of shore duty on the Admiralty board.

Seymour maintained a reputation as a courageous and innovative officer: he was awarded a commemorative medal for his actions at the battle of the Glorious First of June and is credited with introducing epaulettes to Royal Navy uniforms as a method of indicating rank to non-English speaking allies. In his youth he formed close personal friendships with fellow officer John Willett Payne and George, Prince of Wales, through association with whom he gained a reputation as a rake. His marriage in 1785, made at the insistence of his family as an antidote to his dissolution, was brought about through royal connections and proved very successful. During his lifetime he also held several seats as an MP in Parliament, although he did not pursue an active political career.

Hugh Seymour was born in 1759 into one of the wealthiest families in England, as the fifth son of Francis Seymour-Conway, 1st Marquess of Hertford, and his wife Isabella Fitzroy (Hugh retained the surname “Seymour-Conway” until his father’s death in 1794, at which point he shortened it to Seymour).

He was initially educated at Bracken’s Academy in Greenwich, where he met lifelong friend John Willett Payne, before joining the Navy at age 11 at his own insistence. Seymour became a captain’s servant on the yacht William & Mary, and two years later moved to HMS Pearl under his relation Captain John Leveson-Gower, stationed off Newfoundland. After several short commissions, including service in the West Indies under George Rodney, Seymour was attached to HMS Alarm as a midshipman in the Mediterranean. Apart from a brief spell in HMS Trident, Seymour remained on her for several years, becoming a lieutenant in 1776. By 1776 the American Revolutionary War was underway, and Seymour continued in Alarm until he was made a commander in 1778, taking command of the xebec HMS Minorca.

In 1779, Seymour was promoted once more, making post captain in HMS Porcupine and serving in command of HMS Diana, HMS Ambuscade and HMS Latona, all in the Channel Fleet. The only major operation in which he participated during the period was the conclusion of the Great Siege of Gibraltar, when Latona was attached to Lord Howe’s fleet that relieved the fortress. During this service, Seymour was repeatedly engaged in scouting the Franco-Spanish fleet in Algeciras, a task made difficult by bad weather and the erratic movements of the enemy. During much of the operation, Captain Roger Curtis was stationed aboard Latona in order to facilitate communicate between Howe and the Governor of Gibraltar. The effort to relieve and resupply the fortress was a complete success and Latona was sent back to Britain with dispatches, although Seymour remained in Gibraltar.

Following the Peace of Paris in 1783, Seymour took a house in London with his brother Lord George Seymour and John Willett Payne. The three men became notorious socialites, joining the Prince of Wales on many of his drinking exploits across London: Seymour remained close friends with Prince George for the rest of his life. Seymour, already known for his good looks, good manners, height and martial bearing, rapidly gained a reputation for dissolution. In 1785 however, Seymour married Lady Anne Horatia Waldegrave, daughter of Earl Waldegrave and Maria Walpole (later Duchess of Gloucester) at the insistence of his family in a successful attempt to curtail his social activities.

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Lady Anne Horatia Seymour

It was at this time that Seymour made his first foray into politics, becoming MP for Newport on the Isle of Wight before relinquishing the post two years later. In 1788 he became MP for Tregony, but in 1790 he switched to become MP for Wendover. Seymour remained in this position until 1796 when he changed his seat to Portsmouth, in which he remained until his death. He did not serve as an active politician in any of these positions, preferring his navy career to his political one.

In the Spanish armament of 1790, Seymour was called to service in command of the ship of the line HMS Canada, opening his commission with a cruise off the Isle of Wight. Passing through shallow water, Seymour ordered the use of a lead line to measure the depth ahead, but was accidentally struck in the head by the lead weight while soundings were being taken. Although little immediate damage seemed to have been caused, during the firing of a salute several days later Seymour suddenly suffered a severely adverse reaction and had to be taken ashore for emergency medical treatment. The head injury rendered him unable to endure any loud noises or bright lights and for the next three years he lived as an invalid at his country estate in Hambleton.

By 1793 he was sufficiently recovered to return to service, and escorted Lord Hood to the Mediterranean in HMS Leviathan. There Hood led the occupation, defence and ultimate withdrawal from Toulon during the Republican siege of the city. Following the collapse of the city’s defences, Seymour was sent back to England with dispatches but returned shortly afterward to convoy Leviathan back to Britain.

Transferred to the Channel Fleet, Leviathan was attached to service under Lord Howe and served with him during the Atlantic campaign of May 1794 alongside John Willett Payne, captain of HMS Russell. The campaign culminated in the Glorious First of June, when a French fleet was defeated by Howe’s innovative tactics, but was ultimately successful in protecting a large grain convoy from the United States. Seymour’s command of Leviathan was vitally important in the victory, the ship fighting at the initial engagement of the 28 May and seeing extensive action during the battle itself. Seymour was one of only a few of Howe’s commanders to successfully close with the French line, although he was unable to break through it.

Leviathan then engaged closely with America, which she reduced to a battered wreck in a duel that lasted two hours. Leviathan was also badly damaged, having taken fire from Éole and Trajan during the fighting. At Howe’s order, Seymour then left America (which was later captured) and joined the reformed fleet that held off a French counter-attack in the latter stages of the battle. In the aftermath of the action, Seymour was one of the captains marked out for praise, being presented with a medal commemorating his service during the engagement.

In 1795, Seymour moved to the recently captured HMS Sans Pareil and soon became a rear-admiral, engaging the French at the Battle of Groix. During the action, Seymour managed to bring his ship to the head of the British line pursuing the French fleet and engaged the Formidable and Tigre.

Both ships were captured in heavy fighting, and Sans Pareil suffered ten killed and two wounded during the exchange. In 1796, Seymour was employed in the search for the French fleet which attempted and failed to invade Ireland, but Sans Pareil was badly damaged in a collision with HMS Prince during the campaign and had to be decommissioned for extensive repairs.

In Seymour returned to sea with a small squadron of six ships searching the Eastern Atlantic for a Spanish treasure convoy. Although the convoy was eventually seized by a force sent by Lord St. Vincent, Seymour had covered over 5,000 miles in his fruitless search.

Seymour had joined the Admiralty in 1795, becoming a Lord of the Admiralty and participating in much of the work the Admiralty board performed between 1795 and 1798, interposing his periods on land with brief sea commissions. In 1799, Seymour became a vice-admiral and joined the squadron blockading Brest for the next year, being involved in a minor operation against Basque Roads.

In 1799 Seymour was sent to the West Indies as commander-in-chief of Jamaica. In August he led the naval squadron in the capture of Suriname in his flagship Prince of Wales.

However, in 1800 he fell ill, contracting Yellow Fever. He was sent to sea by his doctors in an attempt to regain his health but died aboard HMS Tisiphone in September 1801.

Seymour’s body was returned to Britain aboard HMS Pickle and joined that of his wife, who had died in Bristol a few days before her husband’s death. His extensive estates were dispersed amongst his seven children, one of whom, Sir George Seymour, later became an admiral himself. (Another son, Horace Beauchamp Seymour, was an ancestor of Diana, Princess of Wales, through his grandson the 6th Earl Spencer.) Seymour’s death was widely mourned among his contemporaries, Lord St. Vincent once describing him as “an excellent officer”.

His service had been energetic and characterised by innovation and invention: he developed a new system of fitting topmasts and was also credited with making epaulettes standard among Royal Navy officers, following his difficulties in convincing French Royalists at the Siege of Toulon that he was a British officer, due to his unimpressive uniform.

The Royal Navy has named two ships after Seymour. Baltra Island, or Isla Baltra, is a small island of the Galápagos Islands. Also known as South Seymour (named after Lord Hugh Seymour).

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Trolling, Trolling, Trolling Fly Hides!

Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but I also have delved into Fantasy.

The Trolling series, (the first three are in print) is the story of a man, Humphrey. We meet him as he has left youth and become a man with a man’s responsibilities.

We follow him in a series of stories that encompass the stages of life. We see him when he starts his family, when he has older sons and the father son dynamic is tested.

We see him when his children begin to marry and have children, and at the end of his life when those he has loved, and those who were his friends proceed him over the threshold into death. All this while he serves a kingdom troubled by monsters.

Troubles that he and his friends will learn to deal with and rectify.

It is now available in a variety of formats. For $2.99 you can get this fantasy adventure.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

Amazon for your Kindle

Old age is catching up to Humphrey and his friends. He feels it in his bones and with his son and heir having reached the prime of his life, it could very well be time to pass the baton of rule to Daniel.

With the Valley Kingdom of Torahn at Peace, that would not be a terrible thing to do. Though breaking his decision to his wife Gwendolyn, the Queen, might be the hardest battle that he ever would fight.

Even as the life of retirement looks to be attractive and possible, however, the Valley Kingdom is beset again. Not Goblins, Trolls, Giants or Men, this time. No. That Humphrey knew would be far too easy.

Those obstacles had been overcome before and the problems they presented had solutions that the army of Torahn was trained to deal with. No, of all the creatures that came forth from Teantellen that they had beaten, the one they had never faced now came forth. Dragons!

Who in the realm knew how to fight these mythical beasts? Was there even away to do so?

Now Humphrey who had thought to spend the remainder of his days quietly writing his memoirs and drinking, was faced with the greatest challenge he had ever known.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

John Hely-Hutchinson 2nd Earl of Donoughmore
15 May 1757 – 29 June 1832

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John Hely-Hutchinson 2nd Earl of Donoughmore

He was the son of John Hely-Hutchinson and the Baroness Donoughmore. In 1801 he was created Baron Hutchinson in the Peerage of the United Kingdom (gaining a seat in the House of Lords) and later succeeded to all his brother Richard’s titles. Educated at Eton, Magdalen College, Oxford, and Trinity College, Dublin. He died 29th June 1832, never having married.

He entered the Army as a Cornet in the 18th Dragoons in 1774, rising to a Lieutenant the next year. In 1776 he was promoted to become a Captain in the 67th Regiment of Foot, and a Major there in 1781. He moved regiments again in 1783, becoming a Lieutenant-Colonel in the 77th Regiment of Foot.

In March 1794 he obtained brevet promotion to Colonel, then became a Major-General in May 1796, a Lieutenant-General in September 1803, and a full General in June 1813. In 1811, he became Colonel of the 18th Regiment of Foot.

He served in the Flanders campaigns of 1793 as aide-de-camp to Sir Ralph Abercromby, and in Ireland during the Irish Rebellion of 1798, where he was second-in-command at the Battle of Castlebar under General Lake. In 1799, he was in the expedition to the Netherlands, and was second-in-command of the 1801 expedition to Egypt, under Abercromby. Following Abercromby’s death in March after being wounded at the Battle of Alexandria, Hely-Hutchinson took command of the force. In reward for his successes there, the Ottoman Sultan Selim III made him a Knight, 1st Class, of the Order of the Crescent.

Hely-Hutchinson sat as Member of Parliament (MP) for Lanesborough from 1776 to 1783 and for Taghmon from 1789 to 1790. Subsequently he represented Cork City in the Irish House of Commons until the Act of Union in 1801 and was then member for Cork City in the after-Union Parliament of the United Kingdom until 1802.

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We are looking for illustrators and copyeditors:

These last few weeks I have been profiling here at The Things That Catch My Eye, chapters excerpted from Steam and Thunder, and The Prize is Not as Great As You Think. See the sidebar for all the chapters of each book. I still have another chapter or two of the Prize to impart, but I am stopping midway in each book so that I have whetted your appetites. I also have found that many unscrupulous people will cut and paste my writing and others into one long document and claim that they have written the story I have.

Thus it is best to only show half the book to you all. But the whole story not having been revealed, so to the publishing story. I want to have these two books be Kickstarter projects but to elevate our normal publication scheme. I want to use a professional cover, and illustrations for each chapter.

To do this, I need feedback. One that you would like to see the books done so. But also I need to work up the budget and need quotes from professionals in the field. Those who would like a gig as an illustrator for the books, or more than one. And copyeditors. Please send me your info in the comments section. The funding level will be calculated to ensure that these professionals who contribute will get paid for their work! Illustrators, especially if you can emulate the style of CE Brock would be perfect.

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Those who follow this Blog will know that we maintain a Pinterest Board of all the graphics that are shared in our posts. That way Regency Researchers (I know you all are such) can go to the board and find these graphics easily.
There is even a link on the Right Sidebar. But those new to the Blog might not realize that, so here is our periodic reminder that we have such a service for you to avail yourself of.
There are now more than 450 pins of various people, art, drawings of locations, etc. at the board.
Please enjoy.
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Having finished editing another of our fantasy books, I have started to lean to the idea that perhaps a professional artist might be better than my own renditions, of Trolls, warriors and Dragons.
If anyone knows of someone who would like to discuss designing a cover for RAP, please get in contact with us.
Otherwise we may end up with this
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For our many other works, one of the things we would like to see is having pen & ink or pencil illustrations at the beginning of each chapter. Can you draw like CE Brock? He did amazing work for the books and stories of Jane Austen in the early 1900s.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Sir Anthony Carlisle
15 February 1768 –2 November 1840

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Sir Anthony Carlisle

Carlisle was an English surgeon.

He was born in Stillington, County Durham, the third son of Thomas Carlisle and his first wife, and the half-brother of Nicholas Carlisle, FRS. He was apprenticed to medical practitioners in York and Durham, including his uncle Anthony Hubback and William Green. He later studied in London under John Hunter. In 1793 he was appointed Surgeon at Westminster Hospital in 1793, remaining there for 47 years. He also studied art at the Royal Academy.

In 1800, he and William Nicholson discovered electrolysis by passing a voltaic current through water, decomposing it into its constituent elements of hydrogen and oxygen.

He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1804. He was Professor of Anatomy of the Society from 1808 to 1824.

In 1815, he was appointed to the Council of the College of Surgeons and for many years was a curator of their Hunterian Museum. He served as president of the society, by then the Royal College of Surgeons, in 1828 and 1839. He twice delivered their Hunterian oration, causing consternation at his second oration in 1826 by using the occasion to talk about oysters, earning the epithet of Sir Anthony Oyster. He also delivered their Croonian Lecture in 1804, 1805 and 1807.

He was Surgeon Extraordinary (1820–1830) to King George IV, by whom he was knighted in 1821.

It is likely that he was the author of The Horrors of Oakendale Abbey, a gothic novel published anonymously in 1797 attributed to a ‘Mrs Carver’.

He had married Martha Symmons, daughter of John Symmons, in Alcester, Warwickshire in 1800. On his death in 1840 he was buried in Kensal Green Cemetery.

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I advertise this on Saturdays so some may have seen this before.

I should note that I have found that not everyone who reads my style, hears my writers voice, likes the way I tell a story, while many others ‘get’ me. And they do enjoy my style and voice. Just as there are writers who I don’t like and can’t get past the first five pages of their material. As you read this post you may want to take that into account and look at some of the free samples of my writing that are available, or purchase a book first.

At this point in my writing career, I think, though of course I can’t say for certain, that I have a few fans.

We may be able to count them on the fingers of one hand, but I hope there are more of you out there.

One thing though that I suffer from at this stage, is feedback.

I have 2 writing groups that I attend and we discuss the big issues in writing and critique some of what I have produced, but they do not meet often enough to work through an entire book as fast as I write them.

So, I am looking for someone, or someones who might like to help with the process.

To read my first drafts and check that I am on the right path with my plotting, my character development.

What this means is that I shall include the person(s) who wish to be a part of the process in my thinking and they can help to craft where the story goes.

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The job is to read the draft when I have finished with it, and provide criticism (you can be brutal like that character would never do that! or you forgot David, they didn’t say things like that until forty years later.) Oops… If you see glaring word misuse Then/Than and can correct it that would be appreciated as well, but not totally part of the job description. And to do this in a timely manner.

That last part is because I have hit up close friends to do this. They have volunteered (I placed an open Facebook request) and then I sit, and I wait, and I am reluctant to twist the arms of friends into if they have actually read the files I sent them. So timeliness is important, else I am stumped for moving on to the second draft and the continued editing process so we can release the book for more to read

What you get for this service. A signed copy of the book when released. Your name in the acknowledgements and should we start selling 1000+ copies of each book, real money. (Should we start selling 3000 copies of each book, I’ll place a post for hiring a real copy editor.)

That’s what I got for now. Anyone interested, please don’t hesitate to get in touch!

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables. The list of Previous Notables and Upcoming Entries has grown so long that I will post this once a week on Saturdays now.

Previous Notables (Click to see the Blog):

George III George IV Georgiana Cavendish
William IV Lady Hester Stanhope Lady Caroline Lamb
Princess Charlotte Queen Charlotte Charles James Fox
Queen Adelaide Dorothea Jordan Jane Austen
Maria Fitzherbert Lord Byron John Keats
Princess Caroline Percy Bysshe Shelley Cassandra Austen
Edmund Kean Thomas Clarkson Sir John Moore
John Burgoyne William Wilberforce Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Sarah Siddons Josiah Wedgwood Emma Hamilton
Hannah More John Phillip Kemble John Jervis, Earl St. Vincent
Ann Hatton Stephen Kemble Mary Robinson
Harriet Mellon Zachary Macaulay George Elphinstone
Thomas Babington George Romney Mary Moser
Ozias Humphry William Hayley Daniel Mendoza
Edward Pellew Angelica Kauffman Sir William Hamilton
David Garrick Pownoll Bastard Pellew Charles Arbuthnot
William Upcott William Huskisson Dominic Serres
Sir George Barlow Scrope Davies Charles Francis Greville
George Stubbs Fanny Kemble Thomas Warton
William Mason Thomas Troubridge Charles Stanhope
Robert Fulke Greville Gentleman John Jackson Ann Radcliffe
Edward ‘Golden Ball’ Hughes John Opie Adam Walker
John Ireland Henry Pierrepoint Robert Stephenson
Mary Shelley Sir Joshua Reynolds Francis Place
Richard Harding Evans Lord Thomas Foley Francis Burdett
John Gale Jones George Parker Bidder Sir George Warren
Edward Eliot William Beechey Eva Marie Veigel
Hugh Percy-Northumberland Charles Philip Yorke Lord Palmerston
Samuel Romilly John Petty 2nd Marquess Lansdowne Henry Herbert Southey
Stapleton Cotton Colin Macaulay Amelia Opie
Sir James Hall Henry Thomas Colebrooke Maria Foote
Sir David Baird Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville Dr. Robert Gooch
William Baillie James Northcote Horatio Nelson
Henry Fuseli Home Riggs Popham John Playfair
Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice 3rd Marquess Lansdowne Thomas Douglas 5th Earl of Selkirk Frederick Gerald “Poodle” Byng
Henry Somerset, 7th Duke of Beaufort John Wolcot (Peter Pindar) Joseph John Gurney
Edward John Eliot Henry Perronet Briggs George Lionel Dawson-Damer
Thomas Foley Mark Robinson Charles Culling Smith
Francis Charles Seymour-Ingram, 3rd Marquess of Hertford Thomas Fowell Buxton Tyrone Power
Richard Cumberland William Philip Molyneux, 2nd Earl of Sefton Edward Law, 1st Baron Ellenborough
Jeffry Wyattville Henry Mildmay Nicholas Wood
Hester Thrale Catherine Hughes, Baroness de Calabrella Admiral Israel Pellew
William Wellesley Pole, 3rd Earl of Mornington Henry Moyes Charles Fitzroy
Lord Granville Somerset Lumley St. George Skeffington William Playfair
John Lade Astley Cooper Matthew Gregory Lewis
Edward Pease Thomas Coutts John Urpeth Rastrick
Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond Captain William Baillie John Pitt Kennedy
Henry Cline Sarah Clementina Drummond-Burrell Samuel Wyatt
Lord George Lennox George Bussy Villiers Henry FitzRoy 5th Duke of Grafton
John Bell (Surgeon) Robert Smirke (Painter) John Kennedy (Manufacturer)
John Gell Dugald Stewart Louisa Gurney Hoare
William Nicol (Surgeon) William Nicol (Geologist) Edward Hall Alderson
Thomas Hope Richard Cosway Jonathan Backhouse
Lady Sarah Lennox John Byng, 5th Viscount Torrington Harriette Wilson
Andrew Plimer George Henry Borrow Charles Lamb
Henry Somerset, 5th Duke of Beaufort Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst Skeffington Lutwidge
George Colman the Elder William Hotham Jacob Bell
Charles Heathcote Tatham William Allen (Quaker) John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute
John Henry Manners, 5th Duke of Rutland William Gell Richard Barry, 7th Earl Barrymore
Samuel Bagster the Younger Lady Anne (Wesley) Fitzroy Samuel Gurney
John Liston Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond Luke Howard
Alexander MacKenzie (Explorer) John Pasco Joseph Black
Sir Robert Calder Benjamin Travers John Walker (Cricketer)
John (Johnnie) Walker Joseph Fox the Younger Bishop Beilby Porteus
Sir William Knighton George Rose Edward St. Maur 11th Duke of Somerset
Samuel Bagster the Elder Richard Keppel Craven Edwin Henry Landseer
James Paull (Duelist) Henry Thornton Peter Pond
George Rose (Barrister) William Vincent Humphry Repton
Eliab Harvey Sir George Henry Rose James Kenney
James Kennedy Nevil Maskelyne James Playfair
John Auldjo Thomas Morton (Shipbuilder) Charles Kemble
Sir John Vaughan (Judge) Henry Paget Henry Holland (Cricketer)
Sir Henry Holland (Baronet) Mary Alcock Tom Walker (Cricketer)
Thomas Bradley (Physician) Henry Dundas Trotter Thomas Picton
Sir Charles Middleton William Henry Playfair John Palmer (The 2 Architects)
William Ludlam Thomas Ludlam John Pinch the Elder
George Harris, 1st Baron Edward Waring William Aubrey de Vere Beauclerk 9th Duke of St Albans
Isaac Milner Sir Henry Blackwood William Lovett
General Sir Edward Paget Colonel John Vaughan William Locker
William George Keith Elphinstone Sir William Parker Baronet of Harburn Charles Hutton
John Thomas ‘Antiquity’ Smith Thomas Grey Egerton

1st Earl of Wilton

William Allen (Royal Navy Officer)
Thomas Baldwin Nathaniel Plimer Sir Edward Berry
Charles Gordon Lennox 5th Duke of Richmond George Combe Henry Siddons
Angela Burdett-Coutts William Ellis (Painter) William Drummond of Logiealmond
William George Harris Gerrard Andrewes Berkeley Paget
John Palmer (postal Innovator) Thomas Ludlam Henry Hetherington
Sir Charles Bagot Edward Ellice Francis Douce
Sir Hector Munro Richard Harris Barham Andrew Meikle
William Anderson (Artist) William Hunter Cavendish 5th Duke of Devonshire William Stewart Rose
Harriet Murray John Hunter (Politician) John Thomas Serres
Joseph Antonio Emidy Joseph Hume Thomas Holcroft
Archibald Alison Abraham Rees Thomas Helmore
Colonel William Berkeley Thomas Hearne Richard Carlile
Julius Caesar Ibbetson George Howard, 6th Earl of Carlisle John Rennie
William Oxberry William Hornby William Holme Twentyman
Charles Howard 11th Duke of Norfolk Gerard Lake Sir Archibald Alison, 1st Baronet
Isaac Taylor Edward Howard-Gibbon Marquis of Stafford Granville Leveson-Gower
Robert Aspland George Harris 3rd Baron Harris Thomas Telford
George Phillip Manners Arthur Hill, 3rd Marquess of Downshire Daniel Gurney
Sir Peter Parker John Horsley Palmer Richard Watson (politician)
Joseph Farington Charles Fitzroy, Baron Southampton William Henry West Betty
Charles Stuart (British Army Officer) Marguerite Gardiner, Countess of Blessington Paul III Anton, Prince Esterházy
William Danby George Macartney Richard Payne Knight
Admiral Adam Duncan James George Smith Neill

There will be many other notables coming, a full and changing list can be found here on the blog as I keep adding to it. The list so far is:

  • Victoria
  • Granville Sharp
  • Elizabeth (Gurney) Fry
  • Adam Ferguson of Raith
  • John Pinch the Younger
  • John Palmer (Commissary)
  • William Paley
  • Richard Watson
  • Joseph Louis Lagrange
  • Joseph Milner
  • James Hutton
  • John Boydell
  • Viscount Robert Castlereagh
  • George Canning
  • James Stirling
  • John MacBride
  • William Waldegrave
  • Price Blackwood
  • Alexander Ball
  • William Beatty
  • Sir Sidney Smith
  • Sidney Smith (wit)
  • Geroge Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer
  • John Thomas Duckworth
  • Robert Linzee
  • David Dundas
  • Sir Hyde Parker
  • Sir Thomas Hardy
  • Thomas Hardy (Reformer)
  • Sir William Parker
  • Major General John Dalling
  • William Cornwallis
  • Charles Cornwallis
  • William Baillie (artist)
  • Sir Ralph Abercromby
  • Elizabeth Inchbald
  • George Colman the Younger
  • Thomas Morton
  • Henry Proctor (British Army Officer)
  • Sir George Colebrooke
  • Robert Emmet
  • Thomas Fortescue Kennedy
  • William Taylor of Norwich
  • John Romilly
  • Sir John Herschel
  • John Horne Tooke
  • James Mill
  • Robert Owen
  • Jeremy Bentham
  • John Stuart Mill
  • Thomas Cochrane
  • Edward Jenner
  • Claire Clairmont
  • Fanny Imlay
  • William Godwin
  • William Hazlitt
  • Mary Wollstonecraft
  • James Edward Smith
  • General Sir Robert Arbuthnot
  • Harriet Fane Arbuthnot
  • James Edwards (Bookseller)
  • William Gifford
  • Sir Joseph Banks
  • Richard Porson
  • Edward Gibbon
  • James Smithson
  • William Cowper
  • Jacob Phillipp Hackert
  • Wellington (the Military man)
  • Cuthbert Collingwood
  • Admiral Sir Graham Moore
  • Sydney Smith
  • Admiral Sir William Sydney Smith
  • Admiral Sir Joseph Sydney Yorke
  • Richard Colt Hoare
  • Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville
  • William Howe
  • Richard Howe
  • Viscount Sir Samuel Hood
  • Sir Samuel Hood
  • Alexander Hood
  • Thomas Hope
  • Thomas Babington Macaulay
  • Harriet Martineau
  • Napoleon Bonaparte
  • Charles Pepys, Earl of Cottenham
  • Sir Edward Michael Pakenham
  • General Banastre Tarleton
  • Francis Leggatt Chantrey
  • Sir Charles Grey
  • Charles Grey, 1st Earl Grey
  • Sir Charles Edward Grey
  • John Constable
  • Thomas Lawrence
  • Sir William Lawrence, 1st Baronet
  • George Cruikshank
  • Thomas Gainsborough
  • James Gillray
  • Joseph Priestley
  • William Whewell
  • Horace Walpole
  • Sir Anthony Carlisle
  • Thomas Rowlandson
  • William Blake
  • Isambard Kingdom Brunel
  • Sir Marc Brunel
  • Marquis of Stafford George Leveson-Gower
  • George Stephenson
  • Joseph Locke
  • Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton
  • John Nash
  • John Soane
  • Robert Smirke (architect)
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Robert Southey
  • Henry Holland
  • Sir Walter Scott
  • John Scott, Earl of Eldon
  • Lord Elgin
  • William Windham
  • William Cobbett
  • Madame de Stael
  • John Walker (inventor)(Natural Historian)(Lexicographer)
  • James Boswell
  • Edward James Eliot
  • William Harrison Ainsworth
  • Sir Harry Smith
  • Thomas Cochrane
  • Warren Hastings
  • Edmund Burke
  • William Petty
  • Juana Maria de Los Dolores de Leon (Lady Smith)
  • Lord Bedford, Francis Russell (1765-1802)
  • Colonel George Hanger (c.1751-1824)
  • Lord Hertford, Francis Seymour-Ingram (1743-1822)
  • Louis Philippe Joseph, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1785 as Duc d’ Orleans (1747-1793)
  • Louis Philippe, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1793 as Duc d’ Orleans (1773-1850)
  • Captain John (Jack) Willett Payne (1752-1803)
  • Admiral Lord Hugh Seymour (1759-1801)
  • John Bell
  • Richard Colley Wellesley
  • Henry Wellesley
  • James Wyatt
  • John Blaquiere, 1st Baron de Blaquiere
  • William Pole-Tylney-Long-Wellesley
  • Lord FitzRoy Somerset, 1st Baron Raglan
  • John Fane, 11th Earl of Westmorland
  • Robert Smith, 1st Baron Carrington
  • James Watt
  • John Carr (architect)
  • Henry Thrale
  • John Hunter (Royal Navy)
  • Joseph Pease
  • Richard Trevithick
  • James Foster
  • Emily Lennox
  • Louisa Lennox
  • Thomas Baillie (Royal Navy officer)
  • Charles James Napier
  • John Thelwall
  • Sir William Hotham
  • Beaumont Hotham
  • Matthew Boulton
  • Sir Charles Bell
  • James Gregory
  • John McMahon
  • Edward Maltby
  • Joseph Chitty
  • Ricahrd Barnewell
  • Charles James Blomfield
  • William Carr Beresford, 1st Viscount Beresford
  • Maria Hadfield
  • John Byng 1st Earl of Strafford
  • George Byng 6th Viscount Torrington
  • John Russell, 1st Earl Russell
  • James Spencer-Bell
  • George Brydges Rodney
  • Samuel Pepys Cockerell
  • John Linnell
  • Charles Catton the Younger
  • Frederick Howard, 5th Earl of Carlisle
  • Benjamin Robert Haydon
  • John Dalton
  • Sir Philip Durham
  • William Hasledine Pepys
  • William Babington
  • Joseph Lancaster
  • Samuel Whitbread
  • Francis Augustus Collier
  • Humphry Davy
  • George Shillibeer
  • Samuel Hoare Jr.
  • Thomas Moore
  • Edward Dodwell
  • Archibald Norman McLeod
  • George Vancouver
  • Sir George Simpson
  • William Morgan (actuary)
  • Harry Walker
  • Alexander Walker
  • George Templer
  • Thomas Landseer
  • Sir Robert Inglis
  • Frederick Richard Lee
  • William McGillivray
  • Lucia Elizabeth Vestris
  • John Vaughan 3rd Earl of Lisburne
  • Samuel Rogers
  • Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • Edward Troughton
  • John Richardson
  • John Forsyth
  • Edward Ellice
  • John MacDonald of Garth
  • Sir Archibald Campbell
  • Simon McGillivray
  • Maria Theresa Kemble
  • Thomas Muir of Huntershill
  • Thomas Fyshe Palmer
  • Maurice Margarot
  • Captain William Paget
  • Sir Arthur Paget
  • Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Paget
  • Charles Burney
  • Lord Frederick Beauclerk
  • William Fullarton
  • Francis Jeffrey
  • Charles Simeon
  • Thomas de Quincey
  • James Watson
  • Daniel O’Connell
  • Feargus O’Connor
  • Joseph Nollekens
  • Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster
  • Andrew Geddes
  • Andrew Combe
  • Sir William Hamilton, 9th Baronet
  • William Ellis
  • William A. F. Browne
  • Robert William Elliston
  • William Henry Murray
  • Daniel Terry
  • Joanna Baillie
  • Theodore Hook
  • Robert Scott Lauder
  • Chauncey Hare Townshend
  • Paul Sandby
  • William Heberden the Younger
  • Henry Paget, 1st Earl of Uxbridge
  • Richard Hurd
  • George Mudie
  • Abel Heywood
  • John Cleave
  • George Holyoake
  • Charles Poulett Thomson
  • William Charles Keppel, 4th Earl of Albemarle
  • Thomas Coke, 1st Earl of Leicester
  • George Rennie
  • Elizabeth Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire
  • Frederick Hervey
  • Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Earl Granville
  • Sir Augustus William James Clifford
  • Charles Murray
  • George Lamb (politician and Writer)
  • Dr William Pulteney Alison
  • Francis Baring
  • Thomas Rees
  • John Jones
  • Sir James Edward Smith
  • John Evans
  • Thomas Jervis
  • Olivia Serres
  • Derwent Coleridge
  • Maurice Berkeley, 1st Baron FitzHardinge
  • Henry FitzHardinge Berkeley
  • Grantley Berkeley
  • Craven Berkeley
  • George Cranfield-Berkeley
  • Sir George Beaumont, 7th Baronet
  • Ralph Payne, 1st Baron Lavington
  • Joseph Mallord William Turner
  • Thomas Girtin
  • Thomas Monro
  • George Dance the Younger
  • William Daniell
  • Henry Monro
  • Henry Hunt
  • William Hone
  • James Wilson
  • Robert Taylor (Radical)
  • Benjamin West
  • John Hoppner
  • William Roscoe
  • Thomas Harrison (architect)
  • John Rennie the Younger
  • Sir Samuel Bentham
  • Thomas John Dibdin
  • George Soane
  • John Emery
  • Elizabeth Rebecca Edwin
  • Lawrence Holme Twentyman
  • Mary Ann Gibbon
  • Matthew Howard-Gibbon
  • Sir William Woods
  • John Hely-Hutchinson, 2nd Earl of Donoughmore
  • Patrick Tytler
  • Robert Scott Lauder
  • Isaac Taylor of Ongar
  • Josiah Conder
  • Robert Hall
  • John Foster
  • Olinthus Gilbert Gregory
  • Jane Taylor
  • John Wilson (Scottish writer)
  • Sir James Stephens
  • Ann Taylor (poet)
  • John Eyre
  • Thomas Noon Talfourd
  • Southwood Smith
  • William Johnson Fox
  • Walter Wilson
  • Sir William Pulteney, 5th Baronet
  • William Jessop
  • Benjamin Outram
  • Thomas Campbell
  • Phillip Hardwick
  • Charles Harcourt Masters
  • William Hay, 17th Earl of Erroll
  • Henry Thoby Prinsep
  • Sir Peter Parker, 2nd Baronet
  • John Nichols Thom
  • Thomas Taylour, 1st Marquess of Headfort
  • George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer
  • Charles FitzRoy, 3rd Baron Southampton
  • John Home
  • Frederick Edward Jones
  • John Stuart, 1st Marquess of Bute
  • William Stuart
  • James Archibald Stuart
  • Lady Louisa Stuart
  • James Lowther
  • Charles Stuart, 1st Baron Stuart de Rothesay
  • Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 1st Earl of Minto
  • Andrew Blayney, 11th Baron Blayney
  • Charles Gardiner, 1st Earl of Blessington
  • Richard Robert Madden
  • Walter Savage Landor
  • Sir George Staunton
  • Sir Erasmus Gower
  • William Gilpin
  • Uvedale Price
  • Henry Trollope
  • Sir Richard Onslow
  • Henry Duncan
  • Henry Havelock

The Dukes

  • Duke of Norfolk, Bernard Edward Howard (1765-1842)
  • Duke of Norfolk, Henry Charles Howard (1791-1856)
  • Duke of Somerset, Edward Adolphus Seymour (1804-1885)
  • Duke of Argyll, George William Campbell (1766-1839)
  • Duke of Queensberry, William Douglas (1724-1810)
  • Duke of York , Frederick Augustus Hanover (1763-1827)
  • Duke of Grafton, Augustus Henry FitzRoy, 3rd Duke 1735-1811
  • Duke of Grafton, George FitzRoy, 4th Duke 1760-1844
  • Duke of Gordon, Alexander 4th Duke 1743-1827
  • Duke of Northumberland, Hugh Percy 1742-1817

The Royals

  • Ernest Augustus 1 of Hanover

The Dandy Club

  •         Beau Brummell
  •         William Arden, 2nd Baron Alvanley

Patronesses of Almacks

  •         Emily Lamb, Lady Cowper
  •         Amelia Stewart, Viscountess Castlereagh
  •         Sarah Villiers, Countess of Jersey
  •         Maria Molyneux, Countess of Sefton
  •         Dorothea Lieven, Countess de Lieven, wife of the Russian Ambassador
  •         Countess Esterhazy, wife of the Austrian Ambassador

If there are any requests for personalities to be added to the list, just let us know in the comments section

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First ECO Agents book available

Those who follow me for a long time know that I also write in other fields aside from Regency Romance and the historical novels I do. A few months ago, before the end of last year and after 2011 NaNoWriMo, (where I wrote the first draft of another Regency) I started work on a project with my younger brother Douglas (All three of my brothers are younger brothers.)

The premise, as he is now an educator but once was a full on scientist at the NHI and FBI (Very cloak and dagger chemistry.) was that with the world having become green, and more green aware every week, why not have a group of prodigies, studying at a higher learning educational facility tackle the ills that have now begun to beset the world.

So it is now released. We are trickling it out to the major online channels and through Amazon it will be available in trade paperback. Available at Amazon for your Kindle, or your Kindle apps and other online bookstores. For $5.99 you can get this collaboration between the brothers Wilkin.

Or get it for every teenager you know who has access to a Kindle or other eReader.

FrontCover-2012-07-27-09-00-2012-11-27-07-48-2013-06-21-06-21-2013-09-27-05-00.jpg

Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

iBookstore for your Apple iDevices

Amazon for your Kindle

Five young people are all that stands between a better world and corporate destruction.

Parker, Priya, JCubed, Guillermo and Jennifer are not just your average high school students. They are ECOAgents, trusted the world over with protecting the planet.

Our Earth is in trouble. Humanity has damaged our home. Billionaire scientist turned educator, Dr. Daniel Phillips-Lee, is using his vast resources to reverse this situation.

Zedadiah Carter, leader of the Earth’s most powerful company, is only getting richer, harvesting resources, with the aid of not so trustworthy employees. When the company threatens part of the world’s water supply, covering up their involvement is business as usual.

The Ecological Conservation Organization’s Academy of Higher Learning and Scientific Achievement, or simply the ECO Academy, high in the hills of Malibu, California overlooking the Pacific Ocean, is the envy of educational institutions worldwide. The teenage students of the ECO Academy, among the best and brightest the planet has to offer, have decided they cannot just watch the world self-destruct. They will meet this challenge head on as they begin to heal the planet.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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