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Archive for August, 2012

Timeline

Each time I start a year, I have already compiled a list, months ago with about 6000 entered of what happened from 1788 to 1837. My first step now (It took several trials to get this down to a science) is to cut out the specific year I will work on and paste it into its own spreadsheet to work with. When I worked on the entire spreadsheet, sometimes inserting a line, with all the graphics I had begun to place, took a long time. Working on each year alone, is a lot faster.

With the year separated out, I now turn to my book sources,

The Timetables of History by Grun and Stein1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-24-08-02.jpg

Chronology of CULTURE by Paxton and Fairfield

1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-24-08-02.jpg What Happened When by Carruth.

PastedGraphic-2012-08-24-08-02.jpg, History of the World. A beautiful Dorling Kindersley book.

I now and diligently look through each of these to find entries that I did not come across on the internet, and other printed lists. It is possible that there are places that have more listings for each year. I have not found them. And when you go to the Timelines at the Regency Assembly Press page, there you will see all the graphical references as well. Something that I did not find anywhere else.

Here is the start of 1808:

Year Month Day Event
1808 Jan 1 A US law banning the import of slaves came into effect, but was widely ignored.
1808 Jan 13 Salmon P. Chase, US Treasury secretary during the American Civil War and 6th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, was born. His picture was later put on the $10,000 bill.
1808 Feb 11 Anthracite coal was 1st burned as fuel, experimentally, in Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
1808 Feb 16 The Peninsular War began when Napoleon ordered a large French force into Spain under the pretext of sending reinforcements to the French army occupying Portugal.
1808 Feb 20 Honoré Daumier (d.1879), French painter, sculptor, caricaturist and lithographer, was born in Marseilles. He painted Crispin and Scapin.
1808 February February: Napoleon drops the charade of a French-Spanish alliance, ordering French commanders to halt their marches and seize key Spanish fortresses at San Sebastian, Pamplona, Figuera, and Barcelona.
1808 Mar 1 In France, Napoleon created an imperial nobility.
1808 Mar 6 1st college orchestra in US was founded at Harvard.
1808 Mar 15 Gaetano Gaspari, composer, was born.
1808 Mar 19 Spain’s King Charles IV abdicated.
1808 Mar 23 Napoleon’s brother Joseph took the throne of Spain.
1808 Mar 27 Joseph Haydn’s oratorio “The Seasons,” premiered in Vienna.
1808 Mar 31 French created the Kingdom of Westphalia and ordered Jews to adopt family names.
1808 Apr 13 William Henry Lane (“Juda”) perfected the tap dance.
1808 Apr 17 The Bayonne Decree by Napoleon I of France ordered the seizure of U.S. ships.
1808 Apr 20 Charles Louis Napoleon (d.1873), nephew of Napoleon Bonaparte, was born. He later served as president (1848-1852) and as emperor of France (1852-1870).
1808 Apr 30 Italian Pellegrini Turri built the 1st practical typewriter for the blind Countess Carolina Fantoni da Fivizono, the world’s first typist.
1808 May 2 The citizens of Madrid rose up against Napoleon. It culminated in a fierce battle fought out in the Puerta del Sol, Madrid’s central square. The Spanish were defeated, and during the night the French army lead by Grand Duke Joachim Murat slaughtered hundreds of citizens along the Prado promenade in reprisal.
1808 May 3 Spanish executions took place and were later commemorated in Goya’s painting “Executions of 3rd of May.”
1808 May 15 Michael William Balfe, composer (“The Bohemian Girl”), was born.
1808 May 18 Jacob Albright [Albrecht] (49), German-US preacher, died.
1808 May 21 Eston Hemmings was born to slave Sally Hemmings, who was owned by Thomas Jefferson. Genetic tests in 1998 showed that DNA from Jefferson’s descendants was consistent with DNA from descendants of Hemmings. Some argued that Randolph Jefferson, brother of Thomas, was Eston’s father.
1808 May 30 Napoleon annexed Tuscany and gave it seats in French Senate.
1808 May May: Madrid revolts against the French and a brutal retaliation sets in motion an eruption of uprisings across Spain. Full-scale war begins, forcing Napoleon to increase his military commitment in the Peninsula.
1808 May May: Napoleon forces the Spanish royal family to abdicate and places his brother Joseph Bonaparte on the throne of Spain.
1808 Jun 1 The first US land-grant university was founded-Ohio Univ., Athens, Ohio.
1808 Jun 3 Jefferson Davis — the first and only president of the Confederacy — was born in Christian County, Ky. He was imprisoned and indicted for treason, but the case was dropped.
1808 June – August June – August: The first Siege of Saragossa takes place as 12,000 French troops storm the city. After a long and bloody conflict throughout the summer against Spanish troops and intrepid citizens (including Agustina, Maid of Aragón, immortalized by Goya and Lord Byron) , the French are forced to retreat.
1808 Jul 2 Simon Fraser completed his trip down Fraser River, BC. He landed at Musqueam.
1808 Jul 9 A leather-splitting machine was patented by Samuel  Parker of Billerica, MA.
1808 Jul 20 Napoleon decreed that all French Jews adopt family names.
1808 Jul 28 Sultan Mustapha IV of the Ottoman Empire was deposed and his cousin Mahmud II gained the throne and ruled to 1839.
1808 July July: The Battle of Bailén is a spectacular victory over the French by the Spanish General Castaños, resulting in the total collapse of Naploeon’s military machine in France. It was the first major setback in Napoleon’s unchecked imperialism.
1808 July July: The Times of London sends journalist-diarist Henry Crabb Robinson, 33, to report on the Peninsular War in Spain. He is the world’s first war correspondent.
1808 Aug 1 Joachim Murat (1767-1815), French marshal and Napoleon’s brother in law, became king of Naples (1808-1815) and Sicily.
1808 Aug 21 Napoleon Bonaparte’s General Junot was defeated by Wellington at the first Battle of the Peninsular War at Vimiero, Portugal.
1808 August August: In response to the uprisings in Spain and Portugal, British forces under the command of Arthur Wellesley (the future Duke of Wellington) land in Portugal.
1808 August August: Napoleon names his brother-in-law Joachim Murat as King of Naples and Sicily (replacinghis brother Joseph Bonaparte, who is now King of Spain).
1808 August August: The Convention of Cintra is signed, in which the defeated French are allowed to evacuate Portugal without further conflict.
1808 August August: Wellesley defeats the French under General Delaborde at Rolica.
1808 August August: Wellesley defeats the French under General Junot at Vimiero.
1808 Sep 12 Jose Celestino Mutis (b.1732-1808), Spanish naturalist, died in Santa Fe de Bogote (Colombia). He spent 40 years on his unfinished work “Flora de Nueva Granada.”
1808 September September: The British government is outraged at the terms of the Cintra agreement, and all the generals, including Wellesley, are recalled to England for a Court of Inquiry. Sir John Moore is left in command of the 30,000 British troops still in Portugal.
1808 September September: The Theatre Royal, Covent Garden is destroyed by fire.
1808 Oct 17 The political rights of Jews was suspended in Duchy of Warsaw.
1808 Oct 24 Ernst Friedrich Richter, composer, was born.
1808 Nov 22 Thomas Cook, founder (Cook travel bureau), was born.
1808 November November: Napoleon personally leads his Grande Armée, 200,000 strong, into Spain, promising to conquer it. He routs the Spanish in a series of engagements in November.
1808 November November: Tsar Alexander I of Russia proclaims Finland a part of Russia.
1808 Dec 1 Anton Fischer (30), composer, died.
1808 Dec 7 Electors chose James Madison to be the fourth president of the United States in succession to Thomas Jefferson.
1808 Dec 21 Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 in C Minor and Symphony No. 6 in F Major had their world premieres in Vienna, Austria.
1808 Dec 29 Andrew Johnson, the 17th president of the United States who succeeded Lincoln, was born in a 2-room shack in Raleigh, N.C. [Waxhaw, South Carolina]
1808 December December: Beethoven premiers his Fifth Symphony (Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Opus 67) and the “Pastoral Symphony” (Symphony No. 6 in F major, Opus 68) at a concert in Vienna.
1808 December December: Sir John Moore leads 16,000 men toward Burgos with the ultimate goal of driving the French back into Spain, but is ordered to retreat when it is learned that Napoleon himself was advancing against him with 80,000 troops. The British begin a grim, hazardous retreat to Corunna.
1808 December December: The Second Siege of Saragossa begins.
1808 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s drama Faust, Part 1 is published.
1808 Leigh Hunt becomes editor of the Examiner, a newspaper founded by his brother John Hunt.
1808 Sir Humphrey Davy proves that electricity could produce heat or light between two electrodes separated in space and connected by an arc. His public demonstrations in London are extremely popular, and cause several women to swoon.
1808 The Rum Rebellion.
1808 The Third of May 1808: The Execution of the Defenders of Madrid by Francisco Goya, 1814. 
This painting, along with its companion piece The Second of May 1808 depicting the suppression of the uprising, were commissioned after the fall of Napoleon by Ferdinand VII, King of Spain to celebrate the bravery of the people of Madrid. He disliked both paintings and they were not hung publicly for many decades. Recognized today as masterpieces, they both now hang in the Museo del Prado in Madrid.

1808 Walter Scott publishes his epic poem Marmion.
1808

1808 Napoleon intervenes in a quarrel between Spain’s king, Charles IV, and the son of Charles, Ferdinand. He makes the two of them prisoners in a comfortable setting and moves his brother Joseph from the Kingdom of Naples to the throne in Spain. Spaniards resent the presence of French troops and Napoleon’s interventions. An unusually barbarous war begins within Spain — with Napoleon as usual caring little about hearts and minds. Resistance to the French spreads to Portugal. The British land a force there to help the resistance. It is the beginning of Napoleon’s decline.
1808 Spain’s authority in its American colonies declines. Armed uprisings occurred from Mexico to Argentina. Without Spain in control, the British are able to do more business in Latin America, rescuing Britain from Napoleon’s economic boycott.
1808 John Dalton argues that matter consists of a range of atoms each of which has a distinct weight.
1808 Yi Eung-nok, Korean court painter, was born.
1808 Charles Willson Peale painted the only known portrait of his friend William Bartram, the naturalist. [see Bartram 1739-1823]
1808 Pierre-Paul Prud’hon (1758-1823), French artist, painted “Justice and Divine Vengeance Pursuing Crime.”
1808 Goethe completed the first part of Faust at the insistence of his friend, the poet Friedrich Schiller. Part two was not finished until a few months before Goethe’s death.
1808 Heinrich von Kleist wrote his novella “Michael Kohlhaas.” It later inspired the screenplay for a 1999 HBO movie “The Jack Bull,” written by Dick Cusack.
1808 The libretto for Rossini’s “L’Italiana in Algeri” was written by Anelli.
1808 The first US newspaper west of the Mississippi was founded in St. Louis by Joseph Charles, an Irish refugee. He was financed by Meriwether Lewis, the local territorial governor, who needed someone to print the local laws. In 1998 David Dary published: “Red Blood and Black Ink: Journalism in the Old West.”
1808 In the 1st test of the US Constitution Chief Justice Marshall ruled in favor of Gideon Olmstead and against the state of Pennsylvania to enforce a 1779 decree that only the federal government, and not individual states, had the power to determine the legality of captures on the high seas.
1808 John Dalton, chemist, argued that for each chemical element there is a corresponding atom, and that all else is made from a combination of those atoms.
1808 Sir Humphrey Davy showed that electricity could produce heat or light between two electrodes separated in space and connected by an arc.
1808 The American whaling ship Topaz found one of the bounty mutineers living on Pitcairn Island among many women and children. The other men had all died mostly in conflict over the Tahitian women.
1808 Napoleon chased Portugal’s royal family to Brazil. King Joao VI of Portugal and his court were installed in Rio de Janeiro by a British fleet.
1808 Napoleon codified the French educational curriculum.
1808 Emperor Alexander I of Russia met with Napoleon I at Erfurt, Thuringia, Ger.
1808 A 56-foot oarfish washed ashore in Scotland. This was the first documented sighting of the rare fish.
1808-1814 The Duke of Wellington led the Peninsular Campaign wherein the British send troops to Spain to assist the Spanish revolt against Joseph Bonaparte.
1808-1821 Rio de Janeiro was made the capital of the Portuguese empire.
1808-1830 In 2005 William Anthony Hay authored “The Whig Revival, 1808-1830,” a picture of the British Whigs in the early 19th century.

TWO PEAS IN A POD

That’s right, today is the first week that it is available. Kindle’s today, and then in a week or so, you can have it in your hands physically if you so desire in Trade Paperback form as the other releases from our publisher, Regency Assembly Press does.

This release the publisher is trying out the Kindle Select program so it is exclusive to Amazon for 90 days. What that means for you, a reader, is that should you have

1) a Kindle

2) Are a member of Amazon Prime

then you can borrow the book, free to you, and try before you buy (always, please buy.)

For myself and Regency Assembly Press it is an experiment. RAP (And we hope you all are RAPpers and not RAPscallions) wants to see if this will work. They have also reduced the price of this book to half of what RAP books sell for. $3.99 for an electronic copy.

If you do not have an actual Kindle, Amazon has made it possible to read this book on virtually any electronic device. GO HERE if you want to get a copy for something other than a Kindle, or wait patiently until right before Thanksgiving (November 15th) when it will be released in all other digital formats.

Here is a picture, which of course you can click on to go fetch the book:

TwoPeasinaPod_DavidWilkin_Amazon.com_KindleStore-2012-08-24-08-02.jpg

TWO PEAS IN A POD

978-0-9829989-3-9

Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

Available in other digital formats on 11/15/2012

Again on sale today for $3.99

Read Full Post »

At this point in my career, I think, though of course I can’t say for certain, that I have a few fans.

We may be able to count them on the fingers of one hand, but I hope there are more of you out there.

One thing though that I suffer from at this stage, is feedback.

I have 2 writing groups that I attend and we discuss the big issues in writing and critique some of what I have produced, but they do not meet often enough to work through an entire book as fast as I write them.

So, I am looking for someone, or someones who might like to help with the process.

To read my first drafts and check that I am on the right path with my plotting, my character development.

What this means is that I shall include the person(s) who wish to be a part of the process in my thinking and they can help to craft where the story goes.

babydavid1-2012-08-23-08-00.jpg

The job is to read the draft when I have finished with it, and provide criticism (you can be brutal like that character would never do that! or you forgot David, they didn’t say things like that until forty years later.) Oops… If you see glaring word misuse Then/Than and can correct it that would be appreciated as well, but not totally part of the job description. And to do this in a timely manner.

That last part is because I have hit up close friends to do this. They have volunteered (I placed an open Facebook request) and then I sit, and I wait, and I am reluctant to twist the arms of friends into if they have actually read the files I sent them. So timeliness is important, else I am stumped for moving on to the second draft and the continued editing process so we can release the book for more to read.

What you get for this service. A signed copy of the book when released. Your name in the acknowledgements and should we start selling 1000+ copies of each book, real money. (Should we start selling 3000 copies of each book, I’ll place a post for hiring a real copy editor.)

That’s what I got for now. Anyone interested, please don’t hesitate to get in touch!

DavidRegencyPain-2012-08-23-08-00.jpg

Read Full Post »

TWO PEAS IN A POD

That’s right, today is the first day that it is available as a Trade paperback. So now you can get it for your Kindle’s, and as a Trade Paperback just as the other releases from our publisher, Regency Assembly Press.

With TWO PEAS IN A POD the publisher is trying out the Kindle Select program so it is exclusive to Amazon for 90 days.

So if you desire the book electronically instead of physically then what that means for you, a reader, is that should you have

1) a Kindle

2) Are a member of Amazon Prime

then you can borrow the book, free to you, and try before you buy (always, please buy.)

For myself and Regency Assembly Press it is an experiment. RAP (And we hope you all are RAPpers and not RAPscallions) wants to see if this will work. They have also reduced the price of this book to half of what RAP books sell for. $3.99 for an electronic copy. The Trade Paperback, due to publishing costs and the cut that Amazon takes continue to see a Trade Paperback costing $15.99 (The much hyped royalties that we writers are supposed to get is nowhere near what the news reports say. Most of that price is taken by Amazon.)

If you do not have an actual Kindle, Amazon has made it possible to read this book on virtually any electronic device. GO HERE if you want to get a copy for something other than a Kindle, or wait patiently until right before Thanksgiving (November 15th) when it will be released in all other digital formats.

Here is a picture, which of course you can click on to go fetch the book:

TwoPeasinaPod_DavidWilkin_Amazon.com_KindleStore-2012-08-22-08-41.jpg

TWO PEAS IN A POD

978-0-9829989-3-9

Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

Available in other digital formats on 11/15/2012

Again on sale today for $15.99

There is a visual guide to Two Peas in a Pod RegencyEravisualresearchforTwoPeasinaPodTheThingsThatCatchMyEye-2012-08-22-08-41.jpg as well at Pinterest and a blog post here.

September 1st Post: Having thoughts of something special for this day. Stay tuned.

Read Full Post »

Timeline

Each time I start a year, I have already compiled a list, months ago with about 6000 entered of what happened from 1788 to 1837. My first step now (It took several trials to get this down to a science) is to cut out the specific year I will work on and paste it into its own spreadsheet to work with. When I worked on the entire spreadsheet, sometimes inserting a line, with all the graphics I had begun to place, took a long time. Working on each year alone, is a lot faster.

With the year separated out, I now turn to my book sources,

The Timetables of History by Grun and Stein1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-21-08-02.jpg

Chronology of CULTURE by Paxton and Fairfield

1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-21-08-02.jpg What Happened When by Carruth.

PastedGraphic-2012-08-21-08-02.jpg, History of the World. A beautiful Dorling Kindersley book.

I now and diligently look through each of these to find entries that I did not come across on the internet, and other printed lists. It is possible that there are places that have more listings for each year. I have not found them. And when you go to the Timelines at the Regency Assembly Press page, there you will see all the graphical references as well. Something that I did not find anywhere else.

Here is the start of 1807:

Year Month Day Event
1807 Jan 2 Lord Grenville presented to British Parliament a “Bill for the Abolition of the Slave Trade,” effective May 1. He introduced it directly to the House of Lords. It passed the House of Lords by 64 votes and cleared the House of Commons on March 25.
1807 Jan 7 Responding to Napoleon’s blockade of the British Isles, The British blockaded Continental Europe.
1807 Jan 11 Ezra Cornell, founder of Western Union Telegraph and Cornell University (NY), was born in Westchester, NY.
1807 Jan 19 Robert E. Lee, the commander-in-chief of the Civil War Confederate Armies, was born in Stratford, Va.
1807 Jan 20 Napoleon convened the great Sanhedrin in Paris.
1807 Jan 22 President Thomas Jefferson exposed a plot by Aaron Burr to form a new republic in the Southwest.
1807 Jan 28 London’s Pall Mall was 1st street lit by gaslight.
1807 January January: London’s Pall Mall is the first street to be lit by gaslight.
1807 Feb 5 Pasquale Paoli (80), Corsican freedom fighter, died.
1807 Feb 8 At Eylau, Poland, Napoleon’s Marshal Pierre Agureau attacked Russian forces in a heavy snowstorm. Like Napoleon, to whom he is most often compared, Alexsandr Suvorov believed that opportunities in battle are created by fortune but exploited by intelligence, experience and an intuitive eye. To him, mastery of the art and science of war was not, therefore, purely instinctive. Napoleon’s forces ran low on supplies at Eylau and ate their horses.
1807 Feb 9 French Sanhedrin was convened by Napoleon.
1807 Feb 19 Former Vice President Aaron Burr was arrested in Alabama. He was subsequently tried for treason and acquitted. [see May 22, Sep 1]
1807 Feb 24 In a crush to witness the hanging of Holloway, Heggerty and Elizabeth Godfrey in England 17 died and 15 were wounded.
1807 Feb 27 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (d.1882), was born in Portland, Maine. He was an American poet famous for “The Children’s Hour,” and “Evangeline.” “What is time? The shadow on the dial, the striking of the clock, the running of the sand, day and night, summer and winter, months, years, centuries—these are but arbitrary and outward signs, the measure of Time, not Time itself. Time is the Life of the soul.”
1807 31-Mar Prime Minister of the United Kingdom: William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland
1807 Mar 2 Congress banned slave trade effective January 1, 1808. The further importation of slaves was abolished but an inter-American slave trade continued.
1807 Mar 5 1st performance of Ludwig von Beethoven’s 4th Symphony in B.
1807 Mar 25 William Wilberforce (1759-1833), evangelical member of Parliament, piloted a slave-trade abolition bill through the British House of Commons. This led to a labor problem in South Africa. In 1833 Britain abolished slavery throughout the British Empire when the Slavery Abolition Bill was read a third time
1807 Mar 25 1st railway passenger service began in England.
1807 March March: Beethoven premiers his Fourth Symphony (Symphony No. 4 in B Flat Major, Opus 60) in Vienna.
1807 March March: George III dismisses his prime minister Lord Grenville and replaces him with the Duke of Portland.
1807 March March: Parliament passes the Slave Trade Act, ending the trade in slaves but not slavery.
1807 March March: The horse-powered Swansea and Mumbles Railway in Wales, originally built to transport mined ore to the Swansea docks, becomes the first passenger carrying railway in the world. It does not covert to steam-powered locomotives until 1877.
1807 Apr 4 Joseph Jerome Le Francaise de Lalande, French astronomer, died.
1807 Apr 18 Erasmus Darwin, physician, writer (Influence), died.
1807 Apr 20 Aloysius Bertrand (“Gaspard de la Nuit”), French poet, was born.
1807 May 1 John Bankhead “Prince John” Magruder, Major General (Confederate Army), was born.
1807 May 22 The treason trial of former VP Aaron Burr began in Richmond, Va. [see Sep 1]
1807 May 22 Townsend Speakman 1st sold fruit-flavored carbonated drinks in Phila.
1807 May 28 Jean Louis Agassiz (d.1873), Swiss naturalist and educator, was born.  He wrote a succession of papers [1840] outlining continental glaciation not only of Europe but of North America.
1807 Jun 22 British officers of the HMS Leopard boarded the USS Chesapeake after she had set sail for the Mediterranean, and demanded the right to search the ship for deserters. Commodore James Barron refused and the British opened fire with broadsides on the unprepared Chesapeake and forced her to surrender. The British provocation led to the War of 1812.
1807 Jun 24 A grand jury in Richmond, Va., indicted former Vice President Aaron Burr on charges of treason and high misdemeanor. He was later acquitted.
1807 Jun 25 Napoleon I of France and Russian Czar Alexander I met near Tilsit, in northern Prussia, to discuss terms for ending war between their empires.
1807 Jun 25 Napoleon I of France and Russian Czar Alexander I met near Tilsit, in northern Prussia, to discuss terms for ending war between their empires.
1807 June June: Napoleon defeats Russian troops at the Battle of Friedland.
1807 June June: The Elgin Marbles are displayed to the public for the first time.
1807 Jul 2 In the wake of the Chesapeake incident, in which the crew of a British frigate boarded an American ship and forcibly removed four suspected deserters, President Thomas Jefferson ordered all British ships to vacate U.S. territorial waters.
1807 Jul 4 Giuseppe Garibaldi (1807-1882) Italian military leader, was born in Nice, France. He led the movement to make Italy one nation.
1807 Jul 7 Napoleon I of France and Czar Alexander I of Russia signed a treaty at Tilsit ending war between their empires. It divided Europe among themselves and isolated Britain.
1807 July July: The Earl of Minto becomes the Governor-General of India.
1807 July July: The Treaty of Tilsit between France and Russia divides Europe between the two powers. The new kingdom of Westphalia is created by merging territories ceded by Prussia, including the former Electorate of Hanover, with the Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg and the Electorate of Hesse. Napoleon’s brother Jérôme Bonaparte is named King of Westphalia.
1807 July July: Yesterday, just as His Majesty’s carriage arrived at the Queen’s palace, a woman decently dressed attempted to force her way into the palace after His Majesty. Mssrs. Manus, Townsend, and Sayers were in attendance; they seized her, and she proved to be the same woman Sayers apprehended a few weeks since, under similar circumstances. She was extremely violent, and said she was sent by the Almighty to see the king, who was a very good sort of man, if they would let him alone. She had a petition and a pamphlet, which she wanted to give to the king. The officers took her to the secretary of state’s office. Her name is Margery Flett, and she resides in Star Court, Nightingale Lane, Wapping.-The Lady’s Magazine
1807 Aug 3 Former Vice President Aaron Burr went on trial before a federal court in Richmond, Va., charged with treason. He was acquitted less than a month later.
1807 Aug 11 David Atchison, legislator, was born. He was president pro tempore of the U.S. Senate, and president of U.S. for one day [March 4, 1849], the Sunday before Zachary Taylor was sworn in.
1807 Aug 11 The Eclipse, a Yankee fur trading vessel, sank in the Shumagin Islands, south of the Alaska Peninsula. It is the oldest known American shipwreck in Alaska and as of 2007 had not been found.
1807 Aug 17 Robert Fulton’s “North River Steam Boat” (popularly, if erroneously, known to this day as the Clermont) began heading up New York’s Hudson River on its successful round-trip to Albany. It was 125 feet (142-feet) long and 20 feet wide with side paddle wheels and a sheet iron boiler. He averaged 5 mph for the 300-mile round trip.
1807 Aug 18 Charles Francis Adams (d.1886), U.S. diplomat and public official whose father was John Quincy Adams, was born.
1807 Aug 18 Robert Stevenson (1772-1850) began work on the 117-foot Bell Rock lighthouse at the mouth of Scotland’s Firth of Forth based on a proposal he submitted in 1800. The lighthouse began operating on Feb 1, 1811.
1807 Aug 19 Robert Fulton’s North River Steamboat arrived in Albany, two days after leaving New York.
1807 Aug 21 Robert Fulton’s North River Steamboat set off from Albany on its return trip to New York, arriving some 30 hours later.
1807 Sep 1 Former Vice President Aaron Burr was found innocent of treason. [see 1806] Burr had been arrested in Mississippi for complicity in a plot to establish a Southern empire in Louisiana and Mexico. Burr was then tried on a misdemeanor charge, but was again acquitted.
1807 Sep 2 British forces began bombarding Copenhagen for several days, until the Danes agreed to surrender their naval fleet.
1807 Sep 4 Robert Fulton began operating his steamboat. [see Aug 17]
1807 Sep 7 Denmark surrendered to British forces that had bombarded the city of Copenhagen for four days.
1807 Sep 15 Former Vice President Aaron Burr was acquitted of a misdemeanor charge two weeks after he was found innocent of treason.
1807 Oct 17 Britain declared it would continue to reclaim British-born sailors from American ships and ports regardless of whether they held US citizenship.
1807 November November: Painter Angelica Kauffmann dies at age 66, and is honored by a splendid funeral under the direction of Antonio Canova.
1807 November November: Portugal refuses to honor the trade embargo against England, and Napoleon sends an army into Spain with the task of invading Portugal. Spain enters into the alliance with France under promises of Portuguese territories, and also with an eye on the Portuguese fleet.
1807 Dec 14 A number of meteorites fell onto Weston, Connecticut.
1807 Dec 17 John Greenleaf Whittier, American poet, was born in Haverhill, Mass. He was an abolitionist, reformer and founder of the Liberal Party.
1807 Dec 22 Congress passed the Embargo Act, designed to force peace between Britain and France by cutting off all trade with Europe. It was hoped that the act would keep the United States out the European Wars.
1807 December December: Lisbon is captured by the French.
1807 Charles Lamb and his sister Mary publish the children’s book, Tales of Shakespeare, and it is an instant bestseller.
1807 Horseman from the west frieze of the Parthenon, part of the “Elgin Marbles” brought to England by Lord Elgin between 1801 and 1812. They were first displayed in 1807 in a special shed built by Lord Elgin at a house he rented on Park Lane. In 1811 the Duke of Devonshure agreed to house them at Burlington House. Elgin was finally able to sell them to the British Museum in 1816. From their first exhibition in 1807, the sculptures drew enormous interest. Artists and poets praised them, but others, like Lord Byron, denounced Elgin as a vandal and thought the scultures should have remained in situ. Many still agree with him, and there is an ongoing debate between the Greek government and the British Museum about the rightful disposition of the sculptures.
1807 Jacques Louis David paints his monumental work, The Coronation of Napoleon and Josephine.
1807 Lord Byron publishes his first volume of poetry, Hours of Idleness.
1807 The Geological Society of London is founded, the first society devoted to earth sciences in the world. Humphry Davy is one of its founders.
1807 The slave trade is abolished.
1807 Wordsworth publishes Poems In Two Volumes, including the poems “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” and “The World is Too Much With Us.”
1807

1807 Robert Fulton’s Clermont first successful steamboat.
1807 Extending its power at sea, Britain outlaws slave trading across the Atlantic for its own ships and for ships from all countries united with Napoleon. Britain turns a presence on the coast of western Africa into a crown colony — Sierra Leone.
1807 The U.S. Congress passes a law that bans the importation of slaves into the U.S., a law to be largely ignored in southern states.
1807 In Manchester, England, the largest factory complex in the world opens and the event draws spectators from across Britain and beyond. The factory uses steam acquired from burning coal. It’s a change from power by river water, which is too limited a source for the coming industrial expansion. The availability of coal is helping the British surpass the Dutch industrially.
1807 The Geological Society of London is created, the founders expressing their desire to avoid preconceived notions and to collect facts for discussion.
1807 With help from the French, Muhammad Ali Pasha drives the British out of Egypt (a part of the Ottoman Empire).
1807 Napoleon moves to consolidate his position in Europe. He defeats a combined Prussian and Russian force in February. Danzig surrenders to him. He defeats the Russians in June and occupies Königsberg. Alexander of Russia is annoyed with the British and agrees to meet with Napoleon. In August, Napoleon demands that Portugal join the trade boycott against the British and declare war on Britain. Portugal hesitates. Napoleon’s ally, Spain, allows French troops to pass through its territory to Portugal. The French captured Lisbon as Portugal’s royal family flees to Brazil.
1807 The US Congressional Cemetery near Capital Hill was established.
1807 The US Survey of the Coast formed. It later developed into the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
1807 Lieutenant Zebulon Montgomery Pike strayed beyond the limits of the territory into the Spanish-held territory of New Mexico, and was accused of spying by Spanish authorities. The Spaniards released Pike and his men after they could find no evidence against him. Pike’s explorations the previous November had taken him to the Rockies, where he reached the base of a mountain that would later be named Pikes Peak in his honor. Pike’s mission was to explore the southwestern limits of the Louisiana Territory, the vast tract of land that the United States had purchased from France in 1803 in a deal known as the Louisiana Purchase.
1807 The Geological Society of London was born. It was the first body of men devoted to the earth sciences.
1807 Englishmen William and John Cockerill brought the Industrial Revolution to continental Europe around 1807 by developing machine shops in Liege, Belgium, transforming the country’s coal, iron and textile industries much as it had done in Britain. From roughly 1760 to about 1830, the Industrial Revolution largely occurred in Britain. Realizing the economic advantages, Britain did not allow the export of any machinery, methods or skilled men that might blunt its technological edge. Eventually, the lure of new opportunities convinced continental entrepreneurs and British businessmen to evade England’s official edict.
1807 After Britain outlawed the slave trade people called “Recaptives,” those freed from slave ships, were sent to join the settlers in Sierra Leone. The settlers formed a new tribe called the Kri and created a language called Krio.
1807 Zheng Yi Sao took over a confederation of pirates in the South China Sea about this time following the death if her husband. At its peak the confederation numbered some 50-70 thousand mend and controlled 800 large vessels. The group disbanded in 1810 under an offer of amnesty.
1807 In France Napoleon allied with Russia.
1807 Napoleon gave Danzig (later Gdansk) 6 years of formal independence.
1807 Ignace Playel founded a piano company in Paris, France.
1807 Saud al-Saud invaded Karbala, Iraq, for the second time in 1807, but he could not occupy it.
1807 In Naples, Italy, Major Leopold Hugo, the father of Victor Hugo, was promoted after a successful campaign against the Calabrian banditti.
1807 Serfdom was abolished in the Lithuanian territories known as Suvalkija and Dzukija as far as the Nemunas river. This area had been given to Prussia in the 1795 division and then included into the Warsaw Principality.
1807-1808 Mustafa IV succeeded Selim III in the Ottoman House of Osman.
1807-1809 A Jefferson imposed embargo kept American ships at home. [see Dec 22 1807]
1807-1815 Britain and the Defeat of Napoleon, 1807-1815 by Rory Muir was published in 1996.
1807-1859 Gamaliel Bailey, American abolitionist: “Who never doubted, never half believed. Where doubt is, there truth is—it is her shadow.”
1807-1877 US Sen. John Petit. He once called the Declaration of Independence a “self-evident-lie” in reference to the freedom of blacks.
1807-1881 Giovanni Ruffini, Italian writer: “Curses are like processions. They return to the place from which they came.”

TWO PEAS IN A POD

That’s right, today is the first week that it is available. Kindle’s today, and then in a week or so, you can have it in your hands physically if you so desire in Trade Paperback form as the other releases from our publisher, Regency Assembly Press does.

This release the publisher is trying out the Kindle Select program so it is exclusive to Amazon for 90 days. What that means for you, a reader, is that should you have

1) a Kindle

2) Are a member of Amazon Prime

then you can borrow the book, free to you, and try before you buy (always, please buy.)

For myself and Regency Assembly Press it is an experiment. RAP (And we hope you all are RAPpers and not RAPscallions) wants to see if this will work. They have also reduced the price of this book to half of what RAP books sell for. $3.99 for an electronic copy.

If you do not have an actual Kindle, Amazon has made it possible to read this book on virtually any electronic device. GO HERE if you want to get a copy for something other than a Kindle, or wait patiently until right before Thanksgiving (November 15th) when it will be released in all other digital formats.

Here is a picture, which of course you can click on to go fetch the book:

TwoPeasinaPod_DavidWilkin_Amazon.com_KindleStore-2012-08-21-08-02.jpg

TWO PEAS IN A POD

978-0-9829989-3-9

Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

Available in other digital formats on 11/15/2012

Again on sale today for $3.99

Read Full Post »

TWO PEAS IN A POD

That’s right, today is the first day that it is available. Kindle’s today, and then in a week or so, you can have it in your hands physically if you so desire in Trade Paperback form as the other releases from our publisher, Regency Assembly Press does.

This release the publisher is trying out the Kindle Select program so it is exclusive to Amazon for 90 days. What that means for you, a reader, is that should you have

1) a Kindle

2) Are a member of Amazon Prime

then you can borrow the book, free to you, and try before you buy (always, please buy.)

For myself and Regency Assembly Press it is an experiment. RAP (And we hope you all are RAPpers and not RAPscallions) wants to see if this will work. They have also reduced the price of this book to half of what RAP books sell for. $3.99 for an electronic copy.

If you do not have an actual Kindle, Amazon has made it possible to read this book on virtually any electronic device. GO HERE if you want to get a copy for something other than a Kindle, or wait patiently until right before Thanksgiving (November 15th) when it will be released in all other digital formats.

Here is a picture, which of course you can click on to go fetch the book:

TwoPeasinaPod_DavidWilkin_Amazon.com_KindleStore-2012-08-20-08-01.jpg

TWO PEAS IN A POD

978-0-9829989-3-9

Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

Available in other digital formats on 11/15/2012

Again on sale today for $3.99

There is a visual guide to Two Peas in a Pod RegencyEravisualresearchforTwoPeasinaPodTheThingsThatCatchMyEye-2012-08-20-08-01.jpg as well at Pinterest and a blog post here.

September 1st Post: Having thoughts of something special for this day. Stay tuned.

Read Full Post »

A Visual Look at Two Peas in a Pod

In doing the research for Two Peas, there is a lot of history of the times involved. Now with the aid of Pinterest, I can place pictures there as well as what I keep in my writing file. The ones in my writing file though, written in Scrivener, are easily recoverable for me, but for my readers, you’d have to hack over the internet to my computer to see what I see.

We open at the battle of Waterloo in 1815 PastedGraphic-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg. “It was a close run thing”, is the attribution to the Duke of Wellington. However he really wrote to Blucher, his Prussian counterpart, “ It has been a damned nice thing — the nearest run thing you ever saw in your life.”

PastedGraphic2-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg

The famous picture of the Scot’s Greys at Waterloo PastedGraphic1-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg was one of the first things that came to mind when I thought of placing the brothers, but then I decided that one of the things that lent character to Percival would be he as an infantry officers walking ahead of his men, his sword held high. When you delve into the story you see that is something that becomes part of Percival’s own battle.

My two heroes, Percival, a Captain (the older, and thes the Earl) and Peregrine a Major, are Grenadier Guards. (The Earl of Kent, he could be of another regiment of course, but the Guards were for the elite of class)

PastedGraphic3-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg

Their commander during the campaign was Henry Askew, who is someone that Peregrine, as a Major interacts with more and sees as a mentor.

PastedGraphic4-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg

The County Holdings is in Kent, my hero Percival, is the Earl of Kent, Peregrine is his younger brother by 17 minutes. I located their ancestral home in the village of Chartham.

PastedGraphic5-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg

PastedGraphic6-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg

PastedGraphic7-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg

For background, we have the mention of Lackington’s

PastedGraphic8-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg

A good place to stock your library, which the Earl will want to do as circumstances in the story relate

That the Earl is also tantalized by the Dandys and Brummell their leader, PastedGraphic9-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg is a part of the plot structure.

Then we have the disposition of Peregrine to deal with as well. He, as the second son, though only 17 minutes younger than his brother, has no lands or great monies that he has inherited. He must shift for himself and he has done well in the army. Wellington PastedGraphic10-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg and others think he should stay in the army. Possibly have a posting in India, Africa or even Van Diemen’s Land.

PastedGraphic11-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg

named after

PastedGraphic12-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg

Anthony Van Diemen

The Government of Lord Liverpool was in power in Parliament, and was so for many years, so Robert Jenkinson has a part off camera in our story. Who I have detailed before in a blog post.

PastedGraphic13-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg

As does Lord Byron, who the women of course like a great deal, but our heroes are of an age that they were at school with the man.

PastedGraphic14-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg

Then so much takes place with dancing, we have two balls in the story, and others mentioned as well as Alamack’s and Lady Jersey.

PastedGraphic15-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg PastedGraphic16-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg

You can visit the Pinterest board I designed for this, or better, purchase the book.

TWO PEAS IN A POD

TwoPeasinaPod_DavidWilkin_Amazon.com_KindleStore-2012-08-19-13-22.jpg

TWO PEAS IN A POD

978-0-9829989-3-9

Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

On sale today for $3.99

That’s right, today is the first week that it is available. For Kindle’s today, and then in a week or so, you can have it in your hands physically if you so desire in Trade Paperback form as the other releases from our publisher, Regency Assembly Press does.

This release the publisher is trying out the Kindle Select program so it is exclusive to Amazon for 90 days. What that means for you, a reader, is that should you have

1) a Kindle

2) Are a member of Amazon Prime

then you can borrow the book, free to you, and try before you buy (always, please buy.)

For myself and Regency Assembly Press it is an experiment. RAP (And we hope you all are RAPpers and not RAPscallions) wants to see if this will work. They have also reduced the price of this book to half of what RAP books sell for. $3.99 for an electronic copy.

If you do not have an actual Kindle, Amazon has made it possible to read this book on virtually any electronic device. GO HERE if you want to get a copy for something other than a Kindle, or wait patiently until right before Thanksgiving (November 15th) when it will be released in all other digital formats.

Click on the picture above to fetch the book:

Available in other digital formats on 11/15/2012

Read Full Post »

TWO PEAS IN A POD

That’s right, today is the first week that it is available. Kindle’s today, and then in a week or so, you can have it in your hands physically if you so desire in Trade Paperback form as the other releases from our publisher, Regency Assembly Press does.

This release the publisher is trying out the Kindle Select program so it is exclusive to Amazon for 90 days. What that means for you, a reader, is that should you have

1) a Kindle

2) Are a member of Amazon Prime

then you can borrow the book, free to you, and try before you buy (always, please buy.)

For myself and Regency Assembly Press it is an experiment. RAP (And we hope you all are RAPpers and not RAPscallions) wants to see if this will work. They have also reduced the price of this book to half of what RAP books sell for. $3.99 for an electronic copy.

If you do not have an actual Kindle, Amazon has made it possible to read this book on virtually any electronic device. GO HERE if you want to get a copy for something other than a Kindle, or wait patiently until right before Thanksgiving (November 15th) when it will be released in all other digital formats.

Here is a picture, which of course you can click on to go fetch the book:

TwoPeasinaPod_DavidWilkin_Amazon.com_KindleStore-2012-08-19-10-14.jpg

TWO PEAS IN A POD

978-0-9829989-3-9

Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

Available in other digital formats on 11/15/2012

Again on sale today for $3.99

Timeline

Each time I start a year, I have already compiled a list, months ago with about 6000 entered of what happened from 1788 to 1837. My first step now (It took several trials to get this down to a science) is to cut out the specific year I will work on and paste it into its own spreadsheet to work with. When I worked on the entire spreadsheet, sometimes inserting a line, with all the graphics I had begun to place, took a long time. Working on each year alone, is a lot faster.

With the year separated out, I now turn to my book sources,

The Timetables of History by Grun and Stein1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-19-10-14.jpg

Chronology of CULTURE by Paxton and Fairfield

1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-08-19-10-14.jpg What Happened When by Carruth.

PastedGraphic-2012-08-19-10-14.jpg, History of the World. A beautiful Dorling Kindersley book.

I now and diligently look through each of these to find entries that I did not come across on the internet, and other printed lists. It is possible that there are places that have more listings for each year. I have not found them. And when you go to the Timelines at the Regency Assembly Press page, there you will see all the graphical references as well. Something that I did not find anywhere else.

Here is the start of 1806:

Year Month Day Event
1806 Jan 2 Lord Grenville presented to British Parliament a “Bill for the Abolition of the Slave Trade,” effective May 1. He introduced it directly to the House of Lords. It passed the House of Lords by 64 votes and cleared the House of Commons on March 25.
1806 Jan 7 Responding to Napoleon’s blockade of the British Isles, The British blockaded Continental Europe.
1806 Jan 11 Ezra Cornell, founder of Western Union Telegraph and Cornell University (NY), was born in Westchester, NY.
1806 Jan 19 Robert E. Lee, the commander-in-chief of the Civil War Confederate Armies, was born in Stratford, Va.
1806 Jan 20 Napoleon convened the great Sanhedrin in Paris.
1806 Jan 22 President Thomas Jefferson exposed a plot by Aaron Burr to form a new republic in the Southwest.
1806 Jan 28 London’s Pall Mall was 1st street lit by gaslight.
1806 January January: Admiral Lord Nelson is the first commoner to be given a state funeral.
1806 January January: Ferdinand IV and Maria Carolina of Naples flee to Sicily, and Napoleon installs his brother Joseph Bonaparte as King of Naples and Sicily.
1806 January January: Prime Minister William Pitt dies at age 46. He leaves behind enormous personal debts, which the House of Commons contrives to pay off, but manages to leave his niece, Lady Hester Stanhope, a penison of £1200 a year. She has acted as housekeeper and hostess for her bachelor uncle in the last 3 years of his life.
1806 January January: The British occupy the Cape of Good Hope after the surrender of Cape Town by the Dutch.
1806 January January: The Times of London publishes its first illustration, showing Nelson’s funeral.
1806 11-Feb Prime Minister of the United Kingdom: William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville
1806 Feb 5 Pasquale Paoli (80), Corsican freedom fighter, died.
1806 Feb 8 At Eylau, Poland, Napoleon’s Marshal Pierre Agureau attacked Russian forces in a heavy snowstorm. Like Napoleon, to whom he is most often compared, Alexsandr Suvorov believed that opportunities in battle are created by fortune but exploited by intelligence, experience and an intuitive eye. To him, mastery of the art and science of war was not, therefore, purely instinctive. Napoleon’s forces ran low on supplies at Eylau and ate their horses.
1806 Feb 9 French Sanhedrin was convened by Napoleon.
1806 Feb 19 Former Vice President Aaron Burr was arrested in Alabama. He was subsequently tried for treason and acquitted. [see May 22, Sep 1]
1806 Feb 24 In a crush to witness the hanging of Holloway, Heggerty and Elizabeth Godfrey in England 17 died and 15 were wounded.
1806 Feb 27 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (d.1882), was born in Portland, Maine. He was an American poet famous for “The Children’s Hour,” and “Evangeline.” “What is time? The shadow on the dial, the striking of the clock, the running of the sand, day and night, summer and winter, months, years, centuries—these are but arbitrary and outward signs, the measure of Time, not Time itself. Time is the Life of the soul.”
1806 February February: Lord Grenville becomes Britain’s Prime Minister.
1806 February February: The first issue of the magazine La Belle Assemblée is published.
1806 Mar 2 Congress banned slave trade effective January 1, 1808. The further importation of slaves was abolished but an inter-American slave trade continued.
1806 Mar 5 1st performance of Ludwig von Beethoven’s 4th Symphony in B.
1806 Mar 25 William Wilberforce (1759-1833), evangelical member of Parliament, piloted a slave-trade abolition bill through the British House of Commons. This led to a labor problem in South Africa. In 1833 Britain abolished slavery throughout the British Empire when the Slavery Abolition Bill was read a third time
1806 Mar 25 1st railway passenger service began in England.
1806 March March: Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, celebrated beauty, society hostess, and political campaigner, dies at age 47.
1806 Apr 4 Joseph Jerome Le Francaise de Lalande, French astronomer, died.
1806 Apr 18 Erasmus Darwin, physician, writer (Influence), died.
1806 Apr 20 Aloysius Bertrand (“Gaspard de la Nuit”), French poet, was born.
1806 May 1 John Bankhead “Prince John” Magruder, Major General (Confederate Army), was born.
1806 May 22 The treason trial of former VP Aaron Burr began in Richmond, Va. [see Sep 1]
1806 May 22 Townsend Speakman 1st sold fruit-flavored carbonated drinks in Phila.
1806 May 28 Jean Louis Agassiz (d.1873), Swiss naturalist and educator, was born.  He wrote a succession of papers [1840] outlining continental glaciation not only of Europe but of North America.
1806 May May: England introduces a blockade of the European coast from Brest to the Elbe, but permits ships of neutral nations to pass if they are not carrying goods to or from enemy ports.
1806 Jun 22 British officers of the HMS Leopard boarded the USS Chesapeake after she had set sail for the Mediterranean, and demanded the right to search the ship for deserters. Commodore James Barron refused and the British opened fire with broadsides on the unprepared Chesapeake and forced her to surrender. The British provocation led to the War of 1812.
1806 Jun 24 A grand jury in Richmond, Va., indicted former Vice President Aaron Burr on charges of treason and high misdemeanor. He was later acquitted.
1806 Jun 25 Napoleon I of France and Russian Czar Alexander I met near Tilsit, in northern Prussia, to discuss terms for ending war between their empires.
1806 Jun 25 Napoleon I of France and Russian Czar Alexander I met near Tilsit, in northern Prussia, to discuss terms for ending war between their empires.
1806 June June: Architect Henry Holland dies at age 60.
1806 June June: Napoleon installs his brother Louis Bonaparte as king of Holland.
1806 Jul 2 In the wake of the Chesapeake incident, in which the crew of a British frigate boarded an American ship and forcibly removed four suspected deserters, President Thomas Jefferson ordered all British ships to vacate U.S. territorial waters.
1806 Jul 4 Giuseppe Garibaldi (1807-1882) Italian military leader, was born in Nice, France. He led the movement to make Italy one nation.
1806 Jul 7 Napoleon I of France and Czar Alexander I of Russia signed a treaty at Tilsit ending war between their empires. It divided Europe among themselves and isolated Britain.
1806 July July: English painter George Stubbs dies at age 81.
1806 July July: The Vellore Mutiny is the first instance of a mutiny by the Indian sepoys against the British East India Company.
1806 Aug 3 Former Vice President Aaron Burr went on trial before a federal court in Richmond, Va., charged with treason. He was acquitted less than a month later.
1806 Aug 11 David Atchison, legislator, was born. He was president pro tempore of the U.S. Senate, and president of U.S. for one day [March 4, 1849], the Sunday before Zachary Taylor was sworn in.
1806 Aug 11 The Eclipse, a Yankee fur trading vessel, sank in the Shumagin Islands, south of the Alaska Peninsula. It is the oldest known American shipwreck in Alaska and as of 2007 had not been found.
1806 Aug 17 Robert Fulton’s “North River Steam Boat” (popularly, if erroneously, known to this day as the Clermont) began heading up New York’s Hudson River on its successful round-trip to Albany. It was 125 feet (142-feet) long and 20 feet wide with side paddle wheels and a sheet iron boiler. He averaged 5 mph for the 300-mile round trip.
1806 Aug 18 Charles Francis Adams (d.1886), U.S. diplomat and public official whose father was John Quincy Adams, was born.
1806 Aug 18 Robert Stevenson (1772-1850) began work on the 117-foot Bell Rock lighthouse at the mouth of Scotland’s Firth of Forth based on a proposal he submitted in 1800. The lighthouse began operating on Feb 1, 1811.
1806 Aug 19 Robert Fulton’s North River Steamboat arrived in Albany, two days after leaving New York.
1806 Aug 21 Robert Fulton’s North River Steamboat set off from Albany on its return trip to New York, arriving some 30 hours later.
1806 August August: Francis II abdicates as Holy Roman Emperor, thus ending the 806-year old Holy Roman Empire.
1806 August August: French painter Jean-Honoré Fragonard dies at age 74.
1806 Sep 1 Former Vice President Aaron Burr was found innocent of treason. [see 1806] Burr had been arrested in Mississippi for complicity in a plot to establish a Southern empire in Louisiana and Mexico. Burr was then tried on a misdemeanor charge, but was again acquitted.
1806 Sep 2 British forces began bombarding Copenhagen for several days, until the Danes agreed to surrender their naval fleet.
1806 Sep 4 Robert Fulton began operating his steamboat. [see Aug 17]
1806 Sep 7 Denmark surrendered to British forces that had bombarded the city of Copenhagen for four days.
1806 Sep 15 Former Vice President Aaron Burr was acquitted of a misdemeanor charge two weeks after he was found innocent of treason.
1806 September September: Charles James Fox, prominent Whig statesman and persistant rival of William Pitt, dies at age 57.
1806 September September: Prussia and Saxony declare war on France.
1806 Oct 17 Britain declared it would continue to reclaim British-born sailors from American ships and ports regardless of whether they held US citizenship.
1806 October October: Napoleon defeats Prussia in the twin battles of Jena and Auerstedt.
1806 October October: Opera singer Angelica Catalani arrives in London and is a huge success when she sings at the King’s Theatre in Haymarket.
1806 October October: The first edition of the British magazine Le Beau Monde is published.
1806 November November: Napoleon enforces the Continental System, a blockade forbidding every major power in Europe (who were by then either his allies or conquests) from trading with Britain.
1806 Dec 14 A number of meteorites fell onto Weston, Connecticut.
1806 Dec 17 John Greenleaf Whittier, American poet, was born in Haverhill, Mass. He was an abolitionist, reformer and founder of the Liberal Party.
1806 Dec 22 Congress passed the Embargo Act, designed to force peace between Britain and France by cutting off all trade with Europe. It was hoped that the act would keep the United States out the European Wars.
1806 21-Apr 12:00 AM Saudi Arabs led Sunni raids into Najaf, Iraq, killing about 5,000 people.
1806  
1806 British essayist William Hazlitt publishes Principles of Human Action.
1806 English sisters Ann and Jane Taylor publish Rhymes for the Nursery, which includes Jane’s nursery rhyme “Twinkle, twinkle, little star.”
1806 Funeral procession of Admiral Lord Nelson, from the Admiralty to St. Paul’s, London,January 9, 1806 – print by Augustus Charles Pugin.

1806 Rossini’s first opera, “Demetrio a Polibio,” is performed in Rome.
1806 Watier’s Club is established in London. Dubbed the “Dandy Club” by Lord Byron, it was known for its fine food and high-stakes gambling. Beau Brummell is appointed as perpetual president.
1806 The Emperor of Austria, Francis I, abdicates his other title: Holy Roman Emperor. The Holy Roman Empire, created in the 800s, is formally dissolved, with Napoleon reorganizing much of it into his Confederation of the Rhine.
1806 Jean Jacques Dessalines, leader of Haiti’s revolution and self-declared emperor, is being viewed by his generals as a ridiculous figure. Dessalines announces his plan to march with troops into the south, where he is not popular, and the south explodes in rebellion. Dessalines’ generals prepare a trap for him along the way. His horse is shot from under him. He is pinned under his horse, he is shot in the head and his body hacked to pieces with machetes.
1806 Ruling the seas, a British naval force takes control of Cape Colony in South Africa — the Dutch who had been ruling there now being ruled by Britain’s enemy, Napoleon.
1806 Nov 21, In the Decree of Berlin Emperor Napoleon  banned all trade with England.
1806 Nov 28, French forces led by Joachim Murat entered Warsaw.
1806 Dec 3, Henry Alexander Wise (d.1876), Brig General (Confederate Army), was born.
1806 Dec 6, The African Meeting House was dedicated in Boston. It was later used by Frederick Douglass and other prominent abolitionists to rail against slavery. In 1974 it was named as a National History Landmark. In 2011 a $9 million restoration was completed.
1806 Dec 26, Napoleon’s army was checked by the Russians at the Battle of Pultusk.
1806 Jean-Gabriel Charvet painted his wallpaper panel “Savages of the Pacific Ocean.”
1806 Jean Ingres painted his magnificent: “Napoleon I on His Imperial Throne.”
1806 In London James Beresford published his bestselling book “The Miseries of Human Life, or the groans of Samuel Sensitive and Timothy Testy. With a few supplementary sighs from Mrs. Testy. In twelve dialogues.”
1806 Charles and Mary Lamb authored “Tales from Shakespeare.” [see 1796: Mad Mary Lamb]
1806 Noah Webster (1758-1843), a Connecticut schoolmaster, published a short dictionary. He then began work on a longer work: “An American Dictionary of the English language,” which was completed in England 1825 and published as a 2-volume set in 1828.
1806 Wordsworth (1770-1850) composed the lines: “The world is too much with us.”
1806 A catalog of the plants at Elgin Botanical Garden was published. This was the first botanical garden in NYC and was located at what later became Rockefeller Center.
1806 A printed reference to a mixed drink cocktail first appeared in the US.
1806 William Strickland, architect of the first Town Hall in New York, introduced the technique of the suspension bridge in the United States, which he learned in France.
1806 In Baltimore, Maryland, ground was broken for a cathedral designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe. Bungles and war delayed dedication until 1821. In 1937 Pope Pius XI elevated the cathedral to a basilica.
1806 Jesse Wood of Poughkeepsie, N.Y. was tried for the murder of his son.
1806 Aaron Burr, Vice-President under Thomas Jefferson, was implicated in a reputed plot among northeastern Federalists to break up the Union rather than to submit to four more years of Republican rule. One of the goals of the Burr Conspiracy was to separate Louisiana and other Western states from the Union and establish an empire with Burr at the head. Aaron Burr, formerly vice president under Thomas Jefferson, had recently slain Alexander Hamilton in a duel in July 1804 when he began plotting a movement to separate the Western states from the Union. Burr was later tried for treason in federal court and acquitted. Burr was captured in 1806 on the Ohio River and charged with recruiting forces to further plot the disunion.
1806 Shoemakers in Philadelphia formed a union.
1806 Ye Old Pepper Companie was founded in Salem, Mass., USA. It claims to be the country’s oldest candy company.
1806 NYC Mayor DeWitt Clinton, having read the work of Englishman Joseph Lancaster, formed the New York Free School Society to found Lancastrian schools.
1806 Andrew Jackson killed Charles Dickinson in a duel over a debt owed on a horse race bet. Jackson was struck in the chest by Dickinson‘s shot but returned fire and killed his opponent. “I should have hit him,” he reportedly said, “if he had shot me through the brain.” His duel with Dickinson was one of several the often ill-tempered Jackson engaged in. Jackson, who became the seventh U.S. president in 1829, carried Dickinson‘s bullet in his chest until he died in 1845.
1806 Lord Grenville succeeded William Pitt as British prime minister.
1806 The British wrested power over South Africa from the Dutch and prompt the Boer farmers to later move into the interior.
1806 The British began the construction of Dartmoor Prisoner to house French soldiers captured in the Napoleonic Wars. It was capable of housing 10,500 prisoners and 2,000 guards.
1806 In Paris the 3-mile Canal St. Marten waterway was built to connect the Seine to northeast France.
1806 Napoleon issued his Berlin Decrees. They established the Continental System to restrict European trade with Britain.
1806 Napoleon ordered that all French citizens be vaccinated against smallpox.
1806 A ruling by the Spanish king set a boundary between Honduras and Nicaragua projecting eastward along the 15th parallel from the mouth of the Coco River. In 1999 Nicaragua filed a border case against Honduras with the UN. It was resolved in 2007.
1806-1813 Trieste was held under French rule.
1806-1914 In 1996 Public Broadcasting featured “The West,” a historical documentary covering this period in the US.

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