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Posts Tagged ‘Sloan Square’

History

The location of the lord or ladies home in London is always something I spend time over. And each time I then research the square I use or re-research it. This week I look at Clapton Square.

I have never used the square in any of my writings. It was founded in 1816 following on development from of the Church of St John-at-Hackney which was built in 1792.

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You can see from this drawing from 1830 that the church is surrounded by fields, and so too would be the housing of Clapton Square at the time for it is out in the boondocks of London. Living here would give one the feel of living in a village, just far enough away that you were somewhat countrified, too far to walk to visit any of your neighbors of society. Close enough that a carriage or horse ride would not take very long to pay a social call, or visit the shops a few miles away.

The square was laid out by wealthy brokers from the City to emulate those squares of the West End. Though one may not find the first rank of the Ton about the square, during our period the son of Samuel and Louisa Courtauld was born in a house just off the square. This man, Samuel Courtauld is credited with establishing the famous silversmithing company.

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Interview

Once again I was Interviewed, this time at My Jane Austen Book Club. I have been interviewed a few times these last months. As mentioned last week, here is the post of that interview for your entertainment in the next blog. Though please click on the hyperlink and have a visit at Maria’s site.

TALKING JANE AUSTEN WITH … DAVID WILKIN

A new “Talking Jane Austen with …” session. My guest today is David Wilkin, author of “Colonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence” and “Jane Austen and Ghosts”. Enjoy our Austen chat!

Welcome at My Jane Austen Book Club, David, and thanks for accepting to talk Jane Austen with me. First of all , do you mind telling us something about yourself?

An evaluation in high school suggested I should either be a businessman or a dancer. So I am a businessman, having spent two decades in the woodworking industry and opening a company that does the wood interiors of restaurants.

The dancing part resulted in my mastering the dances from the mid fifteenth century to modern times, and teaching them. I have run several different regular dance practices, and entire dance weekends of these historic dances.

The fondness for the past does not just extend to the pleasantry of dance, but to the study of the conflicts from which History predominates. War gets a lot written about it. That was perhaps my earliest exposure, army men, leading wargaming, and role-playing games. Or just gaming in general. I was around when the first Computer Gaming magazine debuted. I not only have an extensive library of books, but also games, and play many, not more on computers rather than across the table from an opponent over a board, or with miniatures representing our armies.

The extensive library of books, the vast reading that I have indulged in has also had me turn my hand to writing. Starting with simple sketches while in high school and college to completing novels after graduating. I continue to hone this craft.

What is your opinion? Do you think Jane Austen is very angry for what is happening to her works? Vampires and all kind of monsters have invaded her world!

I think Jane would be very angry at what is happening to her works. From her writing I find that she looked at her society and used her stories to not only comment on society, but t ogive hope to the lives of the woman of her society. She was confined to a certain life based on her birth and that England was a very stratified place to live at the time. Her tales were to give women of the Regency a belief that they could be smart, intelligent and destined for a happy marriage. She wrote before the time of Shelley’s Frankenstein and Stoker’s Dracula. But as I understand it, the heroine portrayed here in these new adaptations far exceed anything Lizzy Bennet or Emma Woodhouse ever did

However, it seems our world has gone vampire/monsters crazy. Have you got your own interpretation of this phenomenon? Why is our world so attracted by this kind of supernatural characters?

I can’t really comment on the attraction of the pheonomena. I really do not like watching flicks that scare me. I like Aliens better than Alien because the Marines attack back. I’ve read Dracula twice and I can see that it is a literary masterpiece. I have not read much else, Anne Rice, or others, though what I have read in the genre was never as strong as Bram Stoker. My interpretation is based on ghosts of course as the title of my book suggests. For it, I hope I have grasped another romantic influence, Rex Harrison as the Ghost, in the Ghost and Mrs. Muir.

The story in your book is set in the world of moviemaking. Of course, any work by Jane Austen made into a movie is a bankable project, but don’t you think that sometimes the screen adaptations might distort the real tone of the novels ?

I live out here in Southern California. For a brief time I worked in “Hollywood” doing a night shift for Dick Clark Productions. I taped every American Bandstand and other productions of the company to send to the copyright office. I made my 15 minute pitch to a producer at the end of my gig, but that didn’t fly. So on to other career choices.

For Jane’s work, it is very bankable and I think there is an appeal for all regencies that if produced with the right budget, could make a profit amongst those of us who love this era. Of the productions of the work, I think the only fail I can recall is the 1999 Mansfield Park. (Which was one of Cheryl and my first dates) The other that you might call a fail is the 1940 Pride and Prejudice by Huxley and with Olivier and Garson. That however is one of my favorites and why I came to the love the regency era. Edna May Oliver as Lady Catherine is a hoot…

But aside from my favorites and those I don’t like your question is if the movies drift from the tone of the novels. We look at the supporting characters I think in Jane’s work as caricatures of people and stereotypes so that they enrich the story with humor and pathos. We see the leads as those characters we aspire to be and to have lives as. I think the adaptations in film for the most part hit the mark admirably.

Jane’s world is so down-to-earth, all sense and balance do you think fan fiction mostly respect those features?

I have to say, that I have not read much fan fiction based on Jane. I have read the Stephanie Barron mysteries which I love for the footnotes. I have read a few sequels, and then I have my own, Colonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence. I spent a great deal of time thinking about Colonel Fitzwilliam and the war. The war that Jane ignores a great deal in her writing. Even in Persuasion it is off camera. I don’t think you could have lived in England with the war ocurring and not have had it touch you in a much greater way than Jane’s characters seem to be effected. For my sequel I did my best to convey the drama that the war could have upon a family, and in this case the Bennets and the Darcys.

Without spending time with a great many other authors in the genre of writing fan fiction based on Jane’s work, it would be unfair of me to speak about that. I do know that were one to want to elevate their writing, you need to respect what Jane did with her characters, and you also need to provide characters to have some fun with, as Jane did as well.

What is the appeal of Jane Austen and her world to nowadays readers? What’s the secret of her huge global success ?

Jane has always had an appeal. She gives us a Regency world that is clean and bountiful. All of her heroines are part of the lower upper class, or for Fanny Price, quickly sent to an upper class house. How many of us want to be part of the richest wrung of society? Then Jane has kept the underside, the part of the world that does not appeal away. Including the war as I have mentioned.

The Regency may not have been as pretty as the picture Jane has painted, but she did paint it so nicely that it is a canvas that those of us who write Regencies have been able to use ourselves in our endeavors to leave the world as an ideal and not as the reality that it was.

If Jane had lived nowadays what kind of novels would she have written?

I think she would have written literature for women. Strong heroines, and here, instead of class boundaries that kept a women thinking they would have only one avenue in life to pursue, she would have placed them in a dead-end job, or having chosen the wrong career. Something that they would realize and begin to transform themselves, not with the aid of a hero character such as Darcy. The man would be something they would pick up and drag along as they evolved and completed their transformation.

What is it that you best love in her world and in her work?

I love the sense that things do come out for our heroes and heroines. Happy endings may not be how we are going to be rewarded in life, but in fiction, it is a reward I like a great deal.

What is your favourite Austen novel, hero and heroine?

Persuasion is my favorite tale, while I have to say that Elizabeth Bennet is the ultimate heroine. I love Captain Wentworth, but then to have the wealth of Darcy and to be so exceedingly correct and right is something I wish I could live as. Captain Wentworth and his emotions however seem to be more the lot in life for those of us not born to the highest wealth in the land.

As a lover of the Regency and a Janeite what are you next projects to spread more Austen passion?

I’ve been thinking of perhaps doing something with Margaret Dashwood. Where Colonel Fitzwilliam and history, as well as the last few paragraphs of Pride and Prejudice lent me some firm ideas, Margaret seems a very open character and I do not want to write something that would go to far afield. In the meantime I will release two more, at least, regencies that don’t touch on Jane’s characters this year. One a classic play on a rich heiress and penniless lord. The other about identical twins whose characters are different even should they look exactly alike. That of course is where the drama, trouble and humor will stem from. I have completed the first drafts of both of these novels and am beginning the second draft.

Could you please tell us something more about your new novel: Jane Austen and Ghosts?

As I mentioned, I spent some time in Hollywood, and then my cousin does exactly what our hero of JAnG does. He reads everything he can to see if the studio could make a good movie from it. I thought of that and the various Zombie, Vampire and Sea Monster books and it came to me that Jane isn’t very happy about these works. That they find some way to twist her tales away from the core values.

I then thought that the tale of making these works into a movie, one where as they are doing so, Jane might come back and have a thing or two to say would be humorous. Playing upon that ,the story reflecting a key Jane storyline as well seemed to add to the writing. In the end I have a nicely received short piece that entertains one and all.

Thanks for the interview, I hope that your readers have found this interesting and I am open to answering follow-up questions!

Thanks a lot, David, for being my guest today. Good luck with all your incredible activities and passions!

Jane Austen and Ghosts

The Kindle version has been out for two weeks. It is also available now at Barnes and Noble for your Nook, or at Smashwords. The iTunes edition is also available as is the trade paperwork version so Jane Austen and Ghosts is now physically in print.

You can purchase your copy today at Amazon for $4.99. Or you can purchase at Smashwords, or at Barnes and Noble.

With the availability on the iBookstore for your iPad, and in Trade Paperback, Jane Austen and Ghosts is available at all the outlets that Regency Assembly Press publishes to. The Trade Paperback is now available for $8.99 US and of course available in other currencies for other countries based on that US price. Digital versions across all platforms are $4.99.

Click here to be taken to the webpage on Amazon

A brief synopsis of the story:

In the world of moviemaking, nothing is as golden as rebooting a classic tale that has made fortunes every time before when it has been adapted for the silver screen. Certainly any work by Jane Austen made into a movie will not only be bankable, but also considered a work of art.

That is of course until the current wave of adaptations that unite her classic stories with all the elements of the afterlife is attempted to be created. That these have found success in the marketplace amongst book lovers may not be quite understood by those who make movies. But that they are a success is understood and a reason to make them into movies.

All that being said, perhaps it would also be fair to say that the very proper Jane, were she present to have anything to say about it, would not be pleased. Of course she has been away from this Earth for nearly 200 hundred years. But does that mean were she upset enough, she wouldn’t come back?

Ellis Abbot found stories for tinseltown to make into movies. His most recent find were the batch of stories set in the regency world of Jane Austen. Jane Austen and Monsters.

Meeting with the various authors of those works, it did not seem that Ellis could get one coherent plot of script out of any of them. At least not until he got help from the best source of all.

JAnGhoststhirdFront-2012-03-31-08-48.jpg

Read Full Post »

History

The location of the lord or ladies home in London is always something I spend time over. And each time I then research the square I use or re-research it. This week I look at two squares, Kensington and Sloane. Kensington is the oldest square in London.

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It was founded in 1685 by a wood carver and joiner named Thomas Young, and so by the regency it is well established. However at first it was so far from the action of established London that it might have been doomed to fail if not for the Crown. They established the Royal Palace of Kensington and thus saved the square. It was too late for Thomas Young though. He was deep in debt and imprisoned before this came to pass.

At the time of the Regency Era the Palace is used for minor royalty and it is the home of the young Victoria prior to her ascension to the throne. That the monarchs had left for St. James in the middle of the seventeen hundreds caused the square to go into a slow and gentle decline.

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Notables of the Square during the later Regency Era are philosopher John Stuart Mill at #18, and starting in 1830 the Kensington School at #31. By the early 1830s eight academies were in the square, seven of them for boarders.

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Sloane Square is not as old as Kensington, developed from 1771 and is closer to the center of things. Named after Sir Hans Sloane whose heirs owned the property. Sir Hans was a collector, who bequeathed his items which became the foundation of the British Museum. The square was developed by the father and son architects Henry Holland Senior and Junior. Henry Holland would later work on Prinny’s Brighton Pavilion and Carlton House.

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Sir Hans Sloane

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Henry Holland the Architect

Interview

Once again I was Interviewed, this time at My Jane Austen Book Club. I have been interviewed a few times these last months. I will provide here the post of that interview for your entertainment in the next blog. Though please click on the hyperlink and have a visit at Maria’s site.

Jane Austen and Ghosts

The Kindle version has been out for two weeks. It is also available now at Barnes and Noble for your Nook, or at Smashwords. The iTunes edition is also available as is the trade paperwork version so Jane Austen and Ghosts is now physically in print.

You can purchase your copy today at Amazon for $4.99. Or you can purchase at Smashwords, or at Barnes and Noble.

With the availability on the iBookstore for your iPad, and in Trade Paperback, Jane Austen and Ghosts is available at all the outlets that Regency Assembly Press publishes to. The Trade Paperback is now available for $8.99 US and of course available in other currencies for other countries based on that US price. Digital versions across all platforms are $4.99.

Click here to be taken to the webpage on Amazon

A brief synopsis of the story:

In the world of moviemaking, nothing is as golden as rebooting a classic tale that has made fortunes every time before when it has been adapted for the silver screen. Certainly any work by Jane Austen made into a movie will not only be bankable, but also considered a work of art.

That is of course until the current wave of adaptations that unite her classic stories with all the elements of the afterlife is attempted to be created. That these have found success in the marketplace amongst book lovers may not be quite understood by those who make movies. But that they are a success is understood and a reason to make them into movies.

All that being said, perhaps it would also be fair to say that the very proper Jane, were she present to have anything to say about it, would not be pleased. Of course she has been away from this Earth for nearly 200 hundred years. But does that mean were she upset enough, she wouldn’t come back?

Ellis Abbot found stories for tinseltown to make into movies. His most recent find were the batch of stories set in the regency world of Jane Austen. Jane Austen and Monsters.

Meeting with the various authors of those works, it did not seem that Ellis could get one coherent plot of script out of any of them. At least not until he got help from the best source of all.

JAnGhoststhirdFront-2012-03-24-09-00.jpg

Read Full Post »