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Posts Tagged ‘Simon Wilkin’

Regency Personalities Series

In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency (I include those who were born before 1811 and who died after 1795), today I continue with one of the many period notables.

John Burrell (Entomologist)
September 1762–1825

John Burrell was the son of another John Burrell, whom he eventually succeeded as Rector of Letheringsett, Norfolk, and the grandson of John Holmes, for thirty years Master of Holt School, Burrell was baptised at Letheringsett on 20 September 1762. He was educated by James Smith at Holt School before being admitted to the lists of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, on 6 July 1779. He matriculated in 1781, graduated BA in 1785, and proceeded to MA in 1791. On 22 May 1785 he was ordained a deacon at Norwich and a few months later, on 18 December, became a priest of the Church of England. In 1786 he succeeded his father as Rector and patron of Letheringsett, a benefice he held until his death.

Burrell published a Prodromus lepidopterorum Britannicorum and several papers on the moths, beetles, and true bugs of Norfolk. He was a Fellow of the Linnean Society and a Fellow of the Entomological Society of London. He contributed three papers to the first volume (1812) of the Transactions of this society.

Burrell was a close friend of John Curtis, William Kirby, Simon Wilkin, and William Spence, who all shared his interest in entomology.

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Regency Personalities Series

In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Simon Wilkin
27 July 1790 –1862

Simon Wilkin was the second of the three children of William Wilkin Wilkin, a Norfolk gristmiller, and Cecilia Lucy Wilkin, daughter of William Jacomb of London. When his father died Wilkin moved to Norwich to live with his guardian, Joseph Kinghorn, who educated him. He was a close friend of John Curtis, William Kirby, John Burrell and William Spence who shared his interest in entomology.

Wilkin lost his inherited wealth in 1811 when the paper mill in which he was a partner failed, and in 1832 his guardian’s death was another financial disaster. Bankruptcy forced the sale of his insect collection to the Zoological Society of London. He was then able to establish a printing and publishing business in Norwich. He published the work of Harriet Martineau, Amelia Opie, George Borrow, and William Taylor. In 1825 he married Emma, daughter of John Culley of Costessey, and they had two daughters and a son and in 1834 they moved to London.

Wilkin compiled an edition of Sir Thomas Browne (1836) for which he researched Browne’s correspondence in the British Museum and Bodleian Library.

He was a Fellow of the Linnean Society, and a member of the Wernerian Society of Edinburgh

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