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Posts Tagged ‘Regency Prime Ministers’

Evolution

Since joining the English Historical Fiction Authors, many who follow my blog will have noted that I stepped up my game with it. A lot more history has been presented here, including such articles on Regency Money, The Prime Ministers of the Regency, The Regency Timeline and the Regency Lexicon. All these pages have detailed followups at various parts of the Regency Assembly Press website.

Recently I have started biographies or the Regency Personalties Series, having done so far

Previous Notables (Click to see the Blog):
George III
George IV
William IV
Lady Hester Stanhope
Princess Charlotte
Queen Charlotte
Princess Caroline
Queen Adelaide
Dorothea Jordan
Maria Fitzherbert

There will be many other notables coming, a full and changing list can be found here on the blog as I keep adding to it. The list so far is:

Lord Byron
Shelley
Keats
Jane Austen
Lady Caroline Lamb
Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire
Charles James Fox
William Wilberforce
Thomas Clarkson
Hannah More
Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Edmund Kean
John Phillip Kemble
John Burgoyne
Harriet Mellon
Mary Robinson
Wellington (the Military man)
Nelson
Howe
St. Vincent
Packenham
General Banastre Tarleton
Henry Paget
Stapleton Cotton
Thomas Picton
Constable
Lawrence
Cruikshank
Gillray
Rowlandson

Patronesses of Almacks
Emily Lamb, Lady Cowper
Amelia Stewart, Viscountess Castlereagh
Sarah Villiers, Countess of Jersey
Maria Molyneux, Countess of Sefton
Mrs. Drummond Burrell
Dorothea Lieven, Countess de Lieven, wife of the Russian Ambassador
Countess Esterhazy, wife of the Austrian Ambassador

Widgets

If you take a look at the sidebar on the right (and even click on the links to the books and buy a few) you will notice that there are now some hyperlink widgets to previous posts, so they will be easy to find. There are even a double list for some where the website has more detail then the old blog posts that are here.

The plan will be to have much of the references of the history from the blog displayed on the right sidebar (also giving you a chance to buy some of my works, the only way I can afford to go to the supermarket to get food) including a list linking you to the Prime Ministers, the Lexicon, and other research that has been posted here.

Kickstarter

For those who have been following the Sunday Posts, they know that this is the day we release another chapter in the Duology, Steam and Thunder. So far we have released 8 chapters and that is over half of the first book. This is a call for artists who would like to be paid, should the book go to print, and copyeditors. The plan is to make this a well done KickStarter project. With interior illustrations. We need quotes though so we can price out the project. Please get in touch with us.

NaNo Novel

It is that time of year again, and next week we begin the first draft of Food and Art. A contemporary romance. During NaNoWriMo I shall be hard at work to do a post of the Regency Personalities, write 20 pages a day, look for work, and edit more of The Prize is Not As Great As You Think, our Ruritania Romance that goes up on Wednesdays.

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Regency History

Often in my research I keep needing to find who was leading the government and do this through every book. I thought that having the list handy would be good, and then turning it into a research webpage even better. Here is the list. After I post a few more Timeline years and write some more, I will work on the web page with notes about each PM.

The last PM I am doing of the Regency Era (which we define as from the first Madness of George III to the Coronation of Victoria) is Robert Peel, and I am hosting a page devoted to him and then all our period PMs at Regency Assembly Press. That page is here.

Prime Ministers of England

William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland 04/02/1783
12/19/1783
Whig
William Pitt the Younger 12/19/1783
03/14/1801
Tory
Henry Addington 1st Viscount Sidmouth, “The Doctor” 03/14/1801
05/10/1804
Tory
William Pitt the Younger 05/10/1804
01/23/1806
Tory
William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville 02/11/1806
03/31/1807
Whig
William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland 03/31/1807
10/04/1809
Tory*
Spencer Perceval 10/04/1809
05/11/1812
Tory
Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool 06/08/1812
04/09/1827
Tory
George Canning 04/10/1827
08/08/1827
Tory
Frederick John Robinson, 1st Viscount Goderich 08/31/1827
01/21/1828
Tory
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington 01/22/1828
11/16/1830
Tory
Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey 11/22/1830
07/16/1834
Whig
William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne 07/16/1834
11/14/1834
Whig
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington 11/14/1834
12/10/1834
Tory
Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet 12/10/1834
04/18/1835
Conservative
William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne 04/18/1835
08/30/1841
Whig
Tory* (Tory government, PM a Whig)

Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet

“Orange Peel”

Born 02/15/1788 Bury, Lancashire

Died 07/02/1850 London

Major Acts:

His major acts were when he served his second term in the Victorian Era, the Factory Act and Importation Act.

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Robert Peel’s period in government – as prime minister and in other offices – was a milestone for social reform. Landmark legislation cut working hours for women and children, created cheap and regular rail services, and reorganized the policing of London, changing society in radical ways.

The other achievement for which he is known – repealing the Corn Laws in 1846 – split his party, but earned him lasting popular fame as a humanitarian gesture.

Robert Peel was the son of a wealthy Lancashire cotton mill owner who was also Member of Parliament for Tamworth. It was a new-money background which some in his party would later use to goad him.

Peel’s father was extremely ambitious for him, grooming him for politics and buying him his Commons seat. It is claimed that he told his son ‘Bob, you dog, if you do not become prime minister some day I’ll disinherit you’.

He was educated at Harrow and Christ Church, Oxford, where he excelled, gaining a double first.

Just one year later, in 1809, Peel was elected MP for Cashel, Tipperary, though he was to represent many constituencies during his career, including that of Oxford University.

Considered an arch-unionist, and at that time opposed to Catholic emancipation, he was nicknamed “Orange Peel”.

In 1822 he became Home Secretary after voluntarily resigning his position in Ireland in 1817. During his time, he introduced a number of important reforms of British criminal law.

His changes to the penal code resulted in around 100 fewer crimes being punished by death. He also reformed the gaol system with payment for jailers and education for the inmates. He retained the post of Home Secretary under Wellington in 1828.

Shocking turnaround

During this time Peel was persuaded of the case for Catholic emancipation after twenty years of opposition to it, and pushed the Catholic Emancipation Bill through Parliament, arguing that civil strife was a greater danger. His turnabout on the matter shocked his supporters.

As Home Secretary Peel also created the Metropolitan Police in 1829, leading to the nicknames of “Bobby” (which still endures) and “Peeler” for London’s police officers. On Earl Grey’s resignation in 1834, Peel refused King William IV’s invitation to form a government.

However, he did accept a second request the following year. He lost no time in calling fresh elections, in the hope of winning a large majority.

But the majority Peel won in the election was small, and a number of defeats in Parliament led to his resignation in April.

Peel became PM for the second time in June 1841. It was a time of economic strife, with many out of work and Britain’s international trade suffering. Peel, though never an ideological free trader, took steps to liberalise trade, which created the conditions for a strong recovery.

Peel also passed some groundbreaking legislation.

For example, the Mines Act of 1842 forbade the employment of women and children underground and The Factory Act 1844 limited working hours for children and women in factories.

Failed harvests

In 1845, Peel faced the defining challenge of his career. Failed harvests led much of the population to call for the repeal of the 30-year-old Corn Laws that forbade the import of cheap foreign grain. The crisis was triggered by the Irish potato famine. Unable to send sufficient food to Ireland to stem the famine, Peel eventually decided the Corn Laws must be repealed out of humanity.

But land-owners saw the attempt as an attack on them, and fiercely protested in the House of Commons. Peel’s Conservative Party would not support him, and the debate lasted for five months.

Eventually, in June 1846, the Corn Laws were repealed. However, on the very same day Peel was defeated on another bill, and resigned for the final time.

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“There seem to me to be very few facts, at least ascertainable facts, in politics.”

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First Ministry Under William IV

12/10/1834                        04/18/1835

OFFICE
NAME
TERM
First Lord of the Treasury,

Chancellor of the Exchequer

Leader of the House of Commons
Sir Robert Peel, Bt
December 34–April 1835
Lord Chancellor
The Lord Lyndhurst
December 34–April 1835
Lord President of the Council
The Earl of Rosslyn
December 34–April 1835
Lord Privy Seal
The Lord Wharncliffe
December 34–April 1835
Home Secretary
Henry Goulburn
December 34–April 1835
Foreign Secretary

Leader of the House of Lords

The Duke of Wellington
December 34–April 1835
Secretary of State for War & the Colonies
The Earl of Aberdeen
December 34–April 1835
First Lord of the Admiralty
The Earl de Grey
December 34–April 1835
Master-General of the Ordnance
Sir George Murray
December 34–April 1835
President of the Board of Trade

Master of the Mint

Alexander Baring
December 34–April 1835
President of the Board of Control
The Earl of Ellenborough
December 34–April 1835
Paymaster of the Forces
Sir Edward Knatchbull, Bt
December 34–April 1835
Secretary at War
John Charles Herries
December 34–April 1835

Peel’s Second Ministry was during the time of Victoria.

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Family

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        Peel married Julia, youngest daughter of General Sir John Floyd, 1st Baronet, in 1820. They had five sons and two daughters. Four of his sons gained distinction in their own right.

        His eldest son Sir Robert Peel, 3rd Baronet, served as Chief Secretary for Ireland from 1861 to 1865. His second son Sir Frederick Peel was a politician and railway commissioner. His third son Sir William Peel was a naval commander and recipient of the Victoria Cross. His fifth son Arthur Wellesley Peel was Speaker of the House of Commons and created Viscount Peel in 1895.

        His daughter Julia married the 6th Earl of Jersey. Julia, Lady Peel, died in 1859. Some of his direct descendants now reside in South Africa, the Australian states of Queensland, Victoria and Tasmania, and in various parts of the United States and Canada.

The Writing Life

My current writing project, a Fantasy, the third part of my trilogy on the son of Duke. It is the third in what I started when I left college. I finished the second part about 2 years ago, and so now I will wrap it up and reedit it all. It is tentatively titles, Crown in Jeopardy, the third book in the Born to Grace tale.

It opens with our hero setting up a trap for the enemies.

Chapter 2: Cynwal’s Folly (Conclusion)

Caradoc swung again and let the tip of his sword fall to the level where the man’s neck was. He extended his arm enough so that three inches of blade crossed across the man. It was enough to cut past any defenses and draw blood. His throat separated. He was dead and had not known it, even as the hand that used to grip his shield rose to clasp itself about his torn and bloodied neck. With his shield, Caradoc extended his arm fast into the man who was not concentrating on the fight. It made him lose his balance, and the enemy fell then to the ground, his horse free, scurried away from the battle.

Then, as if he did not have enough to worry about with a battle all around him, he felt a fire lance sizzle by his left shoulder. Another man had been riding towards him to attack. That man was blown out of his saddle by the fire lance. Clearly one of the Magus, and most likely William, was being helpful. Two of the bodyguards that served under Jamus took place in front of Caradoc. And then more men were charging them. He and those with him, were intentionally targets for Cynwal to rally against. Caradoc wanted the enemy Clanrex to send as many men to attack as he could.

It would allow the real mission of Avram and General Frederick the best chance to succeed.

The attackers were increasing there assault. “Back lord,”

“Please Caradoc, behind us.” More of his men were circling near to protect him.

Cynwal and his men were forcing their way closer. And a few fire lances, when there seemed to be a clear shot, came forth. “Very well, I shall move back a few paces.” Caradoc said, but he was not sure that anyone heard him. It was quite noisy.

“MacLaughlin! I’ll kill you!” he heard a shout and knew that was Cynwal. The man had three others between them, but he led from the front of his men. Just as Caradoc had led when he chased Hyfaidd. When Hyfaidd had taken Clarisse.

“Come Clanrex. Come forth and kill me. Or I shall see you dead! I have already killed your murderous fool of a son. Do you think I would not kill the imbecile of a father!” Caradoc shouted. He wished he had William or another Magus invoking a spell to make his words heard above the din.

“I will kill you!” the Clanrex shouted.

Caradoc just stood in his stirrups. “I. Killed. Hyfaidd!” That last must have heard for more than fifty feet for heads turned his way. Men had to have heard. “MacLaughlin!” he shouted and the men near took up the answering cry.

And then when it was repeated again, thousands once more shouted it. That did not sit well with the Clanrex who tried to get to Caradoc

Damn, he thought. His guards and soldiers were not going to let the Clanrex through, and he was fighting very competently. Soon Caradoc knew that the men the Clanrex battles would fall. Most were not as good as the Clanrex, or of himself.

There!

There was a moment that he could spur his horse and charge straight at the man.

His men did not see it, but he could do so if it came again. Caradoc looked to see Jamus, only to find that his chief bodyguard was busy with the men of Cynwal.

“I shall kill,” Cynwall was shouting as he traded blows with men of Caradoc’s guard. Then Caradoc saw the break he needed and spurred his horse, bringing his sword around to the right and falling down to the rear side of his horse using his wrist to get momentum. He was attempting to bring his sword in a large circle, like a windmill. As he neared Cynwal he wanted the sword to be snapping up quickly and then pass over the head of his own horse.

He had practiced such a move countless times. For he had been riding even longer than he had been using a sword, and once he was allowed to use a sword as a squire, he had practiced all forms of combat from the saddle, as well as upon his feet on the ground. The enemy had trouble seeing where the sword was coming from when a rider held it below and to the backside of a horse.

They might guess, but Caradoc also used his shield to hide his intentions as well. How quickly he would snap his wrist up and over was the critical part of the attack. And in this fight, as all were different, how well distracted Cynwal was by anger and the other men that faced him were also important. Caradoc had to contend with wedging his horse between one of the guardsmen who traded blows with Cynwal and the Clanrex. Another of his guardsmen was on Cynwal’s other side.

“Robert, the right!” he called and hoped Robert understood to move his horse a foot or two. The horse would when he sensed another rider approach, but should Robert move as well, then it would be better for Caradoc’s attack. Robert would give him the room to finish the maneuver with the sword. That was to be crucial.

Cynwal had men though as well trying to support the attack. More men at this part of the field then Caradoc. Men who would become, he hoped and expected, disheartened if the saw the Clanrex fall. And the Clanrex had thrown most precautions from him when he sought to attack Caradoc forcefully.

Passion did not have much place on the battlefield. It was detrimental. You lost focus as anger clouded your mind. It caused mistakes. Caradoc knew all this, and was sure that Cynwal knew it as well.

Yet the man was blinded by his desire to kill Caradoc. And as Caradoc closed he forget that there was man on his own right. Jamus, was not in the mood to allow Caradoc to risk his life either.

So as Caradoc came within range of the Clanrex, that man rose in his saddle to place his shield towards Caradoc and defend against the sword that Caradoc was swinging. Cynwal also moved his sword trying to deflect a swing of Jamus, the Clanrex trying to move his sight between the two men, and still worried for the other bodyguard of Caradoc’s was close as well. Robert had tried to hook the man’s shield with his own, which would give Caradoc a better chance to hit him.

But Jamus was the one who got to take advantage of all that was happening. He had not swung at Cynwal, but thrust, the point of his blade finding the links of chainmail below the breastplate the Clanrex wore. The sharp point and edge separated the links of the chain as Jamus jabbed with as much force as he surely could muster. That was what Caradoc would do if he had such an opportunity.

Not that his own attack was a diversion. He guided his hand and by extension his sword, with all the momentum that the swing would bring. He aimed to crest over the Clanrex’s shield, which Robert had jostled lower. With the speed and weight of the sword that he was swinging, Caradoc knew that he would cause damage against the Clanrex’s head. That was Caradoc’s intention.

Jamus though scored well with his jab into the guts of the Clanrex. Cynwal let out a howl even before Caradoc’s sword began to reach where the Clanrex had his head. Though once the man responded to the deadly pain of Jamus’ thrust, his time was finished. Caradoc’s blade his the helmet of the man, lower than he had expected and still dragged through the swing, to slash into the front of the helmet but trended to the lower right side of his neck. An inch or more cutting into the neck and severing the veins there.

One of which carried blood to the brain. The Clanrex took a few seconds to die and fall from his saddle, but he was dead the moment that Caradoc’s blade had severed the vein. He was dead the moment Robert had pulled his shield away to give Caradoc better access. Cynwal was dead the moment he had Jamus’ sword thrust into his guts and cut apart his stomach and intestines.

Cynwal was dead when he allowed the mere presence of Caradoc upon the battlefield to disorient himself and lose sight of what he should concentrate on in a fight. He allowed vengeance to rule him. Not the actions of a commander, or clanrex.

His nearest men saw the death unfold and some were overwrought, while others found renewed zeal to continue the fight. Caradoc, not needing Jamus to tell him, fell back to the protection of his guards. He might, Caradoc suspected, not take another swing, but with those who wanted revenge for the Clanrex’s death, he had to be vigilant. The danger might even have increased because now the enemy fought totally offensively.

When they had a clanrex to protect, they were fighting a defensive battle to protect the man. Little good did that do.

Another man did break trough the ring of guards and Caradoc quickly brought his shield up. But he needn’t have worried. A fire lance flashed out from the camp walls and the man was incinerated, pretty much. Erupting in flames all over caused all men to scream. He had yet to see a man hit by a fire lance and the pain it brought to not be phased by it. No man could withstand such heat.

The incursion towards the enemy that Caradoc had led may have been the smallest of the groups he had sent forth from the camp, and had attracted the greatest number of the enemy, but it was also the one group that had the most Magus and magic protecting it. The enemy should have realized that the reason they had done so poorly, from the very beginning of Hyfaidds taking of Clarisse months before, was that they had a disadvantage with magic.

Especially once Miriam and William had destroyed the minds of several of the Magus amongst those of Powys. They may have been near equals to begin, but by the end of the first day, Northmarch had more than three times the power of Powys, and as the fighting continued, things continued in Northmarch’s favor. Now, William and the scouts also, felt that Powys could muster less than a handful of full Magus. Less than five. If even two were here with the Clanrex, the Magus that William had brought kept them from casting any spells that damaged the men of Northmarch.

Guildmaster Cairn had not said that any man or woman now who was employed by one of the traitorous nobles who had started these terrible wars in the north, were proscribed. He had made it known that he, and those of the Guild of Northmarch, would very much think long and hard about such Magus’ and their future affiliation with the guild when next those Magus needed support of the guild. Archmagus Dripennis and Indulf were said to be looking to start their own Guild, or wrest control from Cairn.

Caradoc noticed, then that Avram had brought his troops out and around and now were harrying the back lines that Caradoc faced. They were going to crush what remained of Cynwal’s personal command. Turning in his saddle, he could see where General Frederick had his men. They were taking prisoners, and those who still fought on the other side of the camp, the enemy was losing terribly.

They had not expected so many to have been snuck about their lands. They had not suspected that another advantage to having more Magus was that one could do so.

“You are a clan chieftain?” Caradoc said to one of the leaders left of the Powys army. Two thousand wounded or dead amongst them. One of which was the Clanrex. Caradoc stood over the body of Cynwal, while across from him knelt all the leaders of what remained of the army of their enemy.

“Yes, MacLaughlin.” The man did not want to parlay. He had little choice.

“This is the law. Not a choice. Not a negotiation. This is how it will be. All Chieftains will stand forfeit until all blood of Cynwal is dead. I think that is three cousins and one uncle. If the women are barren, then they may go forth freely. If they have a child in their belly, we shall wait, and if a male child the babe shall be killed. It seems the only way to satisfy this blood feud.

“Then, your children, you chiefs, shall be held as hostage to ensure your good faith. I think you will give it. But I am unsure. You shall not gather your men ever in groups that shall exceed one hundred. You shall not fight for borders, cattle, horses, or sheep. You shall bring all matters to a magistrate of Northmarch. You shall not pull your swords or knives for a duel. You do so, and a magistrate of Northmarch finds it an offense, you shall lose your right hand. Do it again, you shall lose the left or your head.

“We can live in peace. The family of Cynwal did not wish it and you all paid a terrible price. Then you raided south and acted as Reavers instead of Warriors. This is why you are to be watched. Prove that you would adopt peace and not war with we your neighbors and we shall allow you more freedoms. Force us to war with you once more, and there will be no terms. Your hostages will be executed. The next time we battle you and take you as prisoner, we will behead you. If you force us north once more into your lands, we will kill all we encounter, just as you have done this last year. Do you understand this?”

“It is too harsh!” The chieftain said.

Caradoc looked at the man, then brought up some spit. “Yeah, when I left Duchess Amanda the Vaters of Aer had totaled the number of children, not the adults that you had killed these last months, but just the children that you of Powys had killed because they were on their farms or in their villages. As they always have been during your wars on these lands. Some of them, no doubt, related to you and yours. As I was saying the number of children that had been killed by your soldiers. More than six hundred children.

“You will know that we just took the right hand of the men who stayed on their farms these past days. Not their heads as you did. Not their wives heads, as you did, not their children.

“Say that I am being harsh once more that I hear of it, and I shall not only take your tongue so that you may not speak to me of a lie that you will not claim credit for your own acts of being harsh. I will take your eyes, since you wish to be blind to the acts that you have done. I shall take your ears since you do not want to hear the truth. I will take your nose that you may not smell this odor of death that you have dealt so many times in the name of your clanrex, clan, and lands. I shall take your hands so you may not write lies about your not being involved in the horrors agains the children of Northmarch. I will take your balls that you may not have any more children, and I will stab through the heart until they are dead in my arms the children you have already had, and any children that they have had so that none who carry your tainted lying deceitful blood shall walk this world. Then, I think, then you might be right in thinking I was being harsh.”

Caradoc knew all the clan leaders and chiefs before him had heard. He raised his voice and saw that William aided him with the spell that would make all on the battlefield hear. “For too long the chieftains of Powys have not been happy with their lot. The Clanrex the least happy. For too long they have found the need to raid south, to war south. That shall no longer be tolerated. This time your serfs have suffered most. Think you that I could take the right hand of every man here as we did the serfs. But we do not. We say go live your lives in peace. Your leaders shall give us their children as surety that they shall not wage war against us, or against each other. The lands here, in Powys are difficult. Yet they are filled with beauty. You could turn them to a paradise should you work the land, instead of battle over them. I tell you chiefs that we shall be harsh should your minds stray to war instead of focus upon peace. The next time we of Northmarch must lift sword and shield to defend ourselves, make no mistake, it will be the last time.” Caradoc now looked about and slowly stepped in a circle so that he could see as many of the prisoners as it was possible, and they could see him.

“We shall let you go this day. The line of the Clanrex is finished and there will no longer be such in Powys. No clan should think to elevate one man to that position, for it will bring war. Only the line of the Clanrex shall be further punished. Unless we come back. Then no man, nor boy shall be allowed to live. No grandser shall survive. A male shall be killed in these lands. Your women, though there be no slavery in Northmarch, shall be made an exception and they all will be made slaves. The merest babe, to the oldest granddame. All will be enslaved. The land shall be sowed with salt. The trees and brush shall be burned. The villages and towns shall be raised. The castles shall be destroyed by flame and magic. Powys will be remembered. It will be remembered as the breeding ground and resting ground of those who sought death against those who offered peace and reaped death for such thoughts. If you want to have a life of peace for your sons, and their sons, then return to your homes, crofts and villages and think no more of war!”

He then turned back to the one chief and signaled to William to stop sending his voice to all. “That is harsh. Now call your clansmen to battle and see who would come, for should you do so, I, my sons, there sons, will come and then as I have said, Powys will become memory.” Caradoc turned away and went to his tent. Now he could take off his boots and most of his armor. He could wash his feet and try and cool down. Then, the day after the next, for it would take time to parole the enemy, and round up messengers to send for the children who would be hostages. Then he would go south and rejoin Edward. There were still many other enemies to defeat. Fortunately, Powys would not bother them, he thought, ever again.

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Regency History

Often in my research I keep needing to find who was leading the government and do this through every book. I thought that having the list handy would be good, and then turning it into a research webpage even better. Here is the list. After I post a few more Timeline years and write some more, I will work on the web page with notes about each PM.

The next PM I am doing is William Lamb, and I am hosting a page devoted to him and then all our period PMs at Regency Assembly Press. That page is here.

Prime Ministers of England

William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland 04/02/1783
12/19/1783
Whig
William Pitt the Younger 12/19/1783
03/14/1801
Tory
Henry Addington 1st Viscount Sidmouth, “The Doctor” 03/14/1801
05/10/1804
Tory
William Pitt the Younger 05/10/1804
01/23/1806
Tory
William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville 02/11/1806
03/31/1807
Whig
William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland 03/31/1807
10/04/1809
Tory*
Spencer Perceval 10/04/1809
05/11/1812
Tory
Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool 06/08/1812
04/09/1827
Tory
George Canning 04/10/1827
08/08/1827
Tory
Frederick John Robinson, 1st Viscount Goderich 08/31/1827
01/21/1828
Tory
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington 01/22/1828
11/16/1830
Tory
Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey 11/22/1830
07/16/1834
Whig
William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne 07/16/1834
11/14/1834
Whig
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington 11/14/1834
12/10/1834
Tory
Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet
12/10/1834
04/18/1835
Conservative
William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne 04/18/1835
08/30/1841
Whig
Tory* (Tory government, PM a Whig)

William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne

Born 03/15/1779 London

Died 11/24/1848 Brocket, Herts

Major Acts:

Dissenters’ Marriage Bill 1836 – legalized civil marriage outside of the Church of England

Cuckolded by Byron

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Viscount Melbourne had two lives – the first as the cuckolded husband in one of the most scandalous affairs of the nineteenth century, and the second as senior statesman and mentor to Queen Victoria.

Born William Lamb, in 1805 he succeeded his elder brother as heir to his father’s title. Now known as Lord Melbourne, he married Lady Caroline Ponsonby. It was a marriage which was to cause him no small amount of grief.

He first came to general notice for reasons he would rather have avoided, when his wife had a public affair with poet Lord Byron. The resulting scandal was the talk of Britain in 1812.

In 1806 he was elected to the Commons as the Whig MP for Leominster, where he served 1806-1812 and 1816-1829, before joining the House of Lords on his father’s death

He was Secretary for Ireland 1827-28, and Home Secretary 1830-34, during which time he cracked down severely on agricultural unrest.

On Grey’s resignation in 1834, King William IV appointed Melbourne as the Prime Minister who would be the ‘least bad choice’, and he remained in office for seven years, except for five months following November 1834 when Peel was in charge.

Without any strong political convictions, he held together a difficult and divided Cabinet, and sustained support in the House of Commons through an alliance of Whigs, Radicals and Irish MPs.

He was not a reformer, although the Municipal Corporations Act of 1835 did ensure that the growing middle class secured control of local government.

Efficient PM

But he was efficient in keeping order, raising taxes and conducting foreign policy.

Melbourne also had a close relationship to the monarch. He was Queen Victoria’s first prime minister, and she trusted him greatly. Their close relationship was founded in his responsibility for tutoring her in the world of politics and instructing her in her role, but ran much deeper than this suggests.

Victoria came to regard Melbourne as a mentor and personal friend and he was given a private apartment at Windsor Castle.

Later in his premiership, Melbourne’s support in Parliament declined, and in 1840 it grew difficult to hold the Cabinet together.

His unpopular and scandal-hit term ended in August 1841, when he resigned after a series of parliamentary defeats.

Lady Caroline Ponsonby- Lamb was not a typical politician’s wife.

The daughter of Frederick Ponsonby, 3rd Earl of Bessborough, and the granddaughter of the 1st Earl Spencer, she was born in 1785.

Lady Caroline married Lord Melbourne, in 1805. After two miscarriages, she gave birth to their only child, George Augustus Frederick, in 1807.

He was epileptic and mentally handicapped and had to be cared for almost constantly. Lady Caroline was devoted to him.

In 1812, Caroline read Lord Byron’s Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage and declared:

“If he was as ugly as Aesop, I must know him.” On meeting Byron that summer, she famously noted in her diary that he was “mad, bad and dangerous to know”.

They began an affair which lasted until 1813, but even after it finished Lady Caroline’s obsession with the poet continued. She published a novel, Glenarvon , in 1816 containing obvious portraits of herself, her husband, Byron and many others.

Embarrassed and disgraced, Melbourne decided to part from his wife, though the formal separation did not occur until 1825.

Lady Caroline died in 1828, aged 42, her death hastened by drink and drugs.

Lord Melbourne, not yet prime minister, was by her bedside.

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“It is impossible that anybody can feel the being out of Parliament more keenly for me than I feel it for myself. It is actually cutting my throat. It is depriving me of the great object of my life.”

First Ministry

07/16/1834                        11/14/1834

OFFICE
NAME
TERM
First Lord of the Treasury

Leader of the House of Lords
The Viscount Melbourne
July–November 1834
Lord Chancellor
The Lord Brougham
July–November 1834
Lord President of the Council
The Marquess of Lansdowne
July–November 1834
Lord Privy Seal
Earl of Mulgrave
July–November 1834
Home Secretary
Viscount Duncannon
July–November 1834
Foreign Secretary
The Viscount Palmerston
July–November 1834
Secretary of State for War & the Colonies
Thomas Spring Rice
July–November 1834
First Lord of the Admiralty
The Lord Auckland
July–November 1834
Chancellor of the Exchequer
July–November 1834
Leader of the House of Commons
Viscount Althorp
July–November 1834
President of the Board of Trade
July–November 1834
Treasurer of the Navy
Charles Poulett Thomson
July–November 1834
President of the Board of Control
Charles Grant
July–November 1834
Master of the Mint
James Abercromby
July–November 1834
First Commissioner of Woods and Forests
Sir John Hobhouse, Bt
July–November 1834
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
The Lord Holland
July–November 1834
Paymaster of the Forces
Lord John Russell
July–November 1834
Secretary at War
Edward Ellice
July–November 1834

Second Ministry

April 1835 – August 1839

OFFICE
NAME
TERM
First Lord of the Treasury
The Viscount Melbourne
April 1835–August 1839
Lord Chancellor
In Commission
April 1835–January 1836
The Lord Cottenham
January 1836–August 1839
Lord President of the Council
The Marquess of Lansdowne
April 1835–August 1839
Lord Privy Seal
Viscount Duncannon
April 1835–August 1839
Home Secretary
The Lord John Russell
April 1835–August 1839
Foreign Secretary
The Viscount Palmerston
April 1835–August 1839
Secretary of State for War & the Colonies
The Lord Glenelg
April 1835–February 1839
The Marquess of Normanby
February–August 1839
First Lord of the Admiralty
The Lord Auckland
April–September 1835
The Earl of Minto
September 1835–August 1839
Chancellor of the Exchequer
Thomas Spring Rice
April 1835–August 1839
President of the Board of Trade
Charles Poulett Thomson
April 1835–August 1839
President of the Board of Control
Sir John Cam Hobhouse, Bt
April 1835–August 1839
Secretary at War
Viscount Howick
April 1835–August 1839
First Commissioner of Woods and Forests
Viscount Duncannon
April 1835–August 1839
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
The Lord Holland
April 1835–August 1839

Viscount Duncannon served concurrently as Lord Privy Seal and First Commissioner of Woods and Forests.

August 1839 – September 1841

OFFICE
NAME
TERM
First Lord of the Treasury

Leader of the House of Lords
The Viscount Melbourne
August 1839–September 1841
Lord Chancellor
The Lord Cottenham
August 1839–September 1841
Lord President of the Council
The Marquess of Lansdowne
August 1839–September 1841
Lord Privy Seal
Viscount Duncannon
August 1839–January 1840
The Lord Clarendon
January 1840–September 1841
Home Secretary
The Marquess of Normanby
August 1839–September 1841
Foreign Secretary
The Viscount Palmerston
August 1839–September 1841
Secretary of State for War & the Colonies

Leader of the House of Commons
The Lord John Russell
August 1839–September 1841
First Lord of the Admiralty
The Earl of Minto
August 1839–September 1841
Chancellor of the Exchequer
Sir Francis Thornhill Baring
August 1839–September 1841
President of the Board of Trade
Henry Labouchere
August 1839–September 1841
President of the Board of Control
Sir John Cam Hobhouse
August 1839–September 1841
First Commissioner of Woods and Forests
Viscount Duncannon
August 1839–September 1841
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
The Lord Holland
August 1839–October 1840
The Lord Clarendon
October 1840–June 1841
Sir George Grey, Bt
June–September 1841
Secretary at War
Thomas Babington Macaulay
August 1839–September 1841
Chief Secretary for Ireland
Lord Morpeth
August 1839–September 1841

The Third Ministry was during the time of Victoria.

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Family

Apparently Lamb had a dark side once all the brouhaha with his wife was done. He had married Caronline Ponsonby who stated she did not like Byron’s poetry and then spent her life in an open affair with Lord Byron. A man who had been a friend of Lamb’s when they were at University together.

They had a premature daughter and one son, George Augustus Frederick, born on 11 August 1807, who possibly had severe autism. Until Byron, they had a happy life. Caroline died in 1828, after Byron had died, and had also married Caroline’s cousin, who later separated from him.

Aside from the rumors that circulated about Byron at such time, later in life rumors circulated against the widower Lamb. Rumors suggesting that he may have engaged in spanking of high-born ladies, but whipping of those from the streets.

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The Writing Life

My current writing project, a Fantasy, the third part of my trilogy on the son of Duke. It is the third in what I started when I left college. I finished the second part about 2 years ago, and so now I will wrap it up and reedit it all. It is tentatively titles, Crown in Jeopardy, the third book in the Born to Grace tale.

It opens with our hero setting up a trap for the enemies.

Chapter 2: Cynwal’s Folly (Continues)

Would Arthur Argent have coordinated attacks from Gwynedd, and from Andover without having Cynwal also part of the plot. No. Cynwal was part of Arthur’s conspiracy. It was not Hyfaidd who had instigated it all. Arthur Argent may have done so, but the Clanrex was part of the plot. Now he was going to pay. Caradoc administered high justice and he had decided on the sentence for Cynwal’s hand in the plot. One that had led to the death of King Richard.

Someone was going to see to it that Cynwal did not leave the field that day. That he was killed in battle. If Caradoc had wanted to ensure that the tale was spread around, he would have put a bounty on the man’s head. Caradoc knew that Cynwal had placed one of a thousand gold on his head. Enough money to keep any man in comfort forever.

Even the Earl of West Hills could live well on a thousand gold, though perhaps not as an Earl was supposed to. “Ah, there.” Cynwal and his closest troops were clear of the caltrops and holes on the battlefield and trying to regroup. They could sense the thousands that were spreading out from the camp. And that many were going after him. “Jamus, there! We attack there.”

Jamus looked back to Caradoc and nodded showing that he heard. He didn’t even shake his head which the man would have if he had no intention of taking Caradoc towards the source.

The men of Northmarch had an advantage knowing that they had turned this attack upon them into an ambush against the attackers. That hiding thousands in the camp had allowed them to spring forth with a host, perhaps not as a great as those that attacked, but nearly so. So many soldiers, and so many archers, that when the attackers were mired in the battlegrounds, they did not notice how many losses they were taking, while the defenders barely took one. The enemy had thought they would have charged and been against the Northmarchers quickly. Surely more than 1000 had fallen to the caltrops, or their horses turned lame in the attack, or the arrows piercing into them.

And very few of Northmarch had been wounded. Caradoc raised his sword and shouted “MacLaughlin!” The battle cry.

Again taken up by hundreds and then thousands. Arrows loosed over his head claimed another hundred or two hundred of the enemy. And Cynwal turned and saw Caradoc then. He had nowhere near the sic hundred horsemen who had charged some few minutes before. Much less, but enough that he had men that would fight and kill. That was the thing that surely gave the Clanrex confidence. He thought he had enough men to kill Caradoc. If his men were caught in a trap and suffering great losses, then he was determined to cause many deaths among the enemy as well. An enemy who had continually hurt the men of Powys.

“I would not want to be you, Cynwal, if you do not attack us.” Caradoc said to himself. The man would lose his hold over the clans, he was sure. And then if he did attack, was he as good a fighter as men said about him. Caradoc had fought duels to reduce the bloodshed. He had fought leaders before. He had killed Hyfaidd, the son of Cynwal. That should make the father wish to seek vengeance. Caradoc was right there. He waved his shield and sword at Cynwal who was looking at him.

What Caradoc wanted to force was Cynwal charging against him and the men he had with him. But Caradoc had no need to personally fight the Clanrex. Caradoc knew he was a decent fighter. And perhaps one of the best in his command. But there were other men as good, or better than he. They could fight Cynwal instead. Or, Iain could shoot at him from the wall. Caradoc had told the man who was considered one of the best archers in all of the clan, that it would not hurt his honor if the Clanrex approached within five feet of him and then Caradoc saw an arrow embedded in his head.

Iain chuckled. Well the men of Cynwal seemed to be rallying to him and beginning to form up. Forty, fifty of them. “I hope you are pleased,” Jamus shouted. “You got there attention and they are going to come this way. You do realize that there are more men then we have in this lane, and with those on foot, we shall be outnumbered here.”

Caradoc heard all of that. Jamus had a way of shouting that he could hear such things. Alain, who was now laughing as he held his shield to clout those who came to close said, “Well done.” The man would use a mace against any enemies that he truly had to hit, but the shield had the arms of Valens upon them, as did his surcoat over his armor. All knew his function. Caradoc was sure that some who stood against the Vater were glad to face a priest of the war god for he would try to disarm before trying to kill. If his opponents treated him the same, then those fighting Alain might survive the day with their lives.

Jamus was in the second rank of horsemen that were pushing against the enemy. Caradoc and Alain were in the third Rank. And behind came many more warriors. Caradoc felt it more than he saw it but the men in front of him from Northmarch were expanding their frontage. Then Jamus shouted back, “Hold Caradoc. Let us create a barrier!”

He knew that Jamus was serious. And he also had the Vater of Valens to help him. Jamus was sure to tell Clarisse, too, if Caradoc was too aggressive at that moment. He could shout his challenge, for the men still were doing so. Instead he hefted his sword and positioned his shield to be defensive. More of the men behind him would have to come forward and strengthen the line, and Cynwal was most likely going to arrive before that.

Looking to the far left, that was what was important. Cynwal was focused on hate. A chance that Caradoc had hoped to exploit. Avram led a large group of men along the lane that was farthest that way. Behind them, Frederick led another contingent. Those two, if they broke free, which had been the plan, might flank the enemy and cause such havoc that very few would be able to rout. If the day went against the men of Powys.

And since the enemy had only expected twelve hundred and found that they were fighting nearly five times that many warriors. He knew that they were already upset and disappointed.

A man broke through the lines in front of him and was doing his best to get at Caradoc. Not Cynwal, but large enough that he was probably one of Cynwal’s bodyguard. A man who probably had been instructed to kill Caradoc just as he had told so many to do their best to kill Cynwal.

Caradoc was at a standstill, and the enemy had a little momentum to his charge. Caradoc braced himself and raised his shield. He was in time to deflect the blow that was aimed at him. But then he had trained to be able to do that for countless hours. Years.

Combat though, was when his life was most at risk. This time as all the other times he had been involved in a fight. And the times that he was involved were increasing in frequency. He did not always leave a fight whole either. By directing battles and not participating in them as a fighter he had a better chance of not bleeding during the fight.

By not being the recipient of an enemies blows, he might not end up bruised. And maybe even his feet wouldn’t get so hot. That was more and more bothersome. That his feet were so damn hot. It made him angered.

A second blow was deflected by his shield. Vater Alain was not going to help get rid of the attacker, for he was trying to be a man defending, and not attacking. The men of Powys worshipped Valens too.

Caradoc saw no help for it, and stood quickly, pushing against the stirrups. Rising he deflected a third blow even as he brought his own sword twisting to slash under the man’s shield he faced. That let his sword slash upwards on the other side of the shield and he knew he hit the man’s shield arm, though the angle did not allow any cutting except perhaps against the strap.

Recovering his sword, he tried to pull hard against any constraint. His sword was very sharp, and if it found a think leather tie, it might cut it. With his sword free he quickly hit it against the man’s shield, and it did seem to move a little. The man once more tried to strike and Caradoc moved his shield in between them. He was there for every strike. And the man had another that he wanted to send Caradoc’s way. Not that Caradoc knew he was very fast, or absurdly fast but the man seemed slow. He was very tall, but he was slow.

And so Caradoc struck again trying to get over the shield but the big man had a big shield. Caradoc’s sword glanced off the top of the rim of the large shield. And the man’s shield shook again. More than it should have. Caradoc must have damaged the ties, he thought. Once more under, and there the enemy had a weakness.

Once more under and pull hard to cut the leather ties and any other armor he could reach. He also had to place his shield between the enemies blade and his head once more. The man should have learned to very his attack. It was too predictable.

Though the enemy losing his shield to the ground was sure to force a change in his routine. As the shield fell away, Caradoc did not want to give him much time. He slashed out again and struck against a now exposed shoulder. He struck hard and though he did not cut into the bone, the man had armor there, he did bruise that shoulder badly. The next strike Caradoc aimed for the helmet. Let him ring a bit.

A solid hit on the man and his head. Time for another. These could be very painful if they kept up. More to do with all that metal on your head being pushed about and how your neck held up. Caradoc would have to be lucky to have his sword cut through the helmet, which was pretty thick steel. But there were places of weakness in the head area. The eye slits, for instance.The neck was always thinly protected, even if there was chainmail there. It had to do with the articulation. If you wanted to see anywhere but straight ahead, you would want to move your helmet about, just as you could do with your head without a helmet. So the neck area was not solid steel.

It took good arm control to move the tip of the blade to where you wanted it to go. But then man squires, especially the sons of the great lords, learned how to do that long before they were considered for advancement to knighthood. Caradoc had mastered it years ago.

Fighting the man, though, also kept others of Powys from engaging him, and should one of those others happen to be Cynwal, then it would be too dramatic for him and the rest of the army. An army that should have had one person kill the Clanrex by then. A thousand gold pieces Cynwal would give to any who killed him. Maybe that was why the warrior still had not retreated. He had no shield and his head must have hurt terribly by then.

“Retreat man. Do you want me to kill you!” Caradoc shouted at the man. Striking once more on the man’s head.

Their steeds were well trained, for they allowed the two men to face each other without too much jostling about. “Never! Swine!”

“Do you not think I shall kill you?”

“Hyfaidd was my friend!” The fool said. That decided it for Caradoc. Hyfaidd was the worst of any type of lord.

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Regency History

Often in my research I keep needing to find who was leading the government and do this through every book. I thought that having the list handy would be good, and then turning it into a research webpage even better. Here is the list. After I post a few more Timeline years and write some more, I will work on the web page with notes about each PM.

The next PM I am doing is Charles Grey, and I am hosting a page devoted to him and then all our period PMs at Regency Assembly Press. That page is here.

Prime Ministers of England

William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland 04/02/1783
12/19/1783
Whig
William Pitt the Younger 12/19/1783
03/14/1801
Tory
Henry Addington 1st Viscount Sidmouth, “The Doctor” 03/14/1801
05/10/1804
Tory
William Pitt the Younger 05/10/1804
01/23/1806
Tory
William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville 02/11/1806
03/31/1807
Whig
William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland 03/31/1807
10/04/1809
Tory*
Spencer Perceval 10/04/1809
05/11/1812
Tory
Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool 06/08/1812
04/09/1827
Tory
George Canning 04/10/1827
08/08/1827
Tory
Frederick John Robinson, 1st Viscount Goderich 08/31/1827
01/21/1828
Tory
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington 01/22/1828
11/16/1830
Tory
Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey 11/22/1830
07/16/1834
Whig
William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne
07/16/1834
11/14/1834
Whig
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington 11/14/1834
12/10/1834
Tory
Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet
12/10/1834
04/18/1835
Conservative
William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne
04/18/1835
08/30/1841
Whig
Tory* (Tory government, PM a Whig)

Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey

“Earl Grey”

Born 03/13/1764 Falloden, Northumberland

Died 07/17/1845 Howick Hall, Howick, Northumberland

Major Acts:

Reform Act 1832 – reformed the electoral process

Slavery Abolition Act 1833 – abolished slavery throughout all the Empire

An affair and child out of wedlock with the notorious Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire

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A firmly Whig politician, Earl Grey oversaw four years of political reform that had enormous impact on the development of democracy in Britain.

Earl Grey’s political experience before becoming the Prime Minister was limited.

He first took office briefly under Grenville in 1806, but it was nearly a quarter of a century before he returned to office as PM.

Earl Grey’s most remarkable achievement was the Reform Act of 1832, which set in train a gradual process of electoral change.

Indeed, it sowed the seeds of the system we recognise today.

Around 130 years of parliamentary reform began with this act and culminated in universal suffrage for men and women over 18, secret ballots and legitimate constituencies.

The battle to pass the historic act was a difficult one.

Grey resigned after the Lords rejected it, although he returned to office when Wellington found himself unable to form an administration.

Wellington then consented, and Grey was able to push the bill through.

Other reforming measures included restrictions on the employment of children, and the abolition of slavery in the British Empire in 1833.

Best-known for tea

One of Grey’s other legacies is the blend of tea known as Earl Grey. He reputedly received a gift, probably a diplomatic present, of tea that was flavored with bergamot oil.

It became so popular that Grey asked British tea merchants to recreate it.

After resigning in 1834, Grey did not linger in politics. He was greatly attached to his family, and he retired from the limelight to spend his remaining years with them.

He was said to be ‘tall, slim and strikingly handsome’ although in later years he went bald and wore spectacles.

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Ministry

11/22/1830                        07/16/1834

        

Lord Grey — First Lord of the Treasury and Leader of the House of Lords

Lord Brougham — Lord Chancellor

Lord Lansdowne — Lord President of the Council

Lord Durham — Lord Privy Seal

Lord Melbourne — Secretary of State for the Home Department

Lord Palmerston — Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs

Lord Goderich — Secretary of State for War and the Colonies

Sir James Graham — First Lord of the Admiralty

Lord Althorp — Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons

Charles Grant — President of the Board of Control

Lord Holland — Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster

The Duke of Richmond — Postmaster-General

Lord Carlisle — Minister without Portfolio

Changes

June, 1831 — Lord John Russell, the Paymaster of the Forces, and Edward Smith-Stanley, the Chief Secretary for Ireland, join the Cabinet.

April, 1833 — Lord Goderich, now Lord Ripon, succeeds Lord Durham as Lord Privy Seal. Edward Smith-Stanley succeeds Ripon as Secretary of State for War and the Colonies. His successor as Chief Secretary for Ireland is not in the Cabinet. Edward Ellice, the Secretary at War, joins the Cabinet.

June, 1834 — Thomas Spring Rice succeeds Stanley as Colonial Secretary. Lord Carlisle succeeds Ripon as Lord Privy Seal. Lord Auckland succeeds Graham as First Lord of the Admiralty. The Duke of Richmond leaves the Cabinet. His successor as Postmaster-General is not in the Cabinet. Charles Poulett Thomson, the President of the Board of Trade, and James Abercrombie, the Master of the Mint, join the Cabinet.

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Family

Grey married Mary Elizabeth Ponsonby (1776 – 1861), only daughter of William Ponsonby, 1st Baron Ponsonby and Hon. Louisa Molesworth in 1794. The marriage was a fruitful one; between 1796 and 1819 the couple had ten sons and six daughters:

        [a dau.] Grey (stillborn, 1796)

        Lady Louisa Elizabeth Grey (7 April 1797 – 26 November 1841); married John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham

        Lady Elizabeth Grey (10 July 1798 – 8 November 1880); married John Crocker Bulteel (d. 10 September 1843). Their daughter, Louisa Emily Charlotte Bulteel, is one of the great-great-great-grandmothers of Diana, Princess of Wales

        Lady Caroline Grey (30 August 1799 – 28 April 1875); married Capt. The Hon. George Barrington

        Lady Georgiana Grey (17 February 1801 – 1900); never married

        Henry George Grey, 3rd Earl Grey (28 December 1802 – 9 October 1894), eldest son, who became a politician like his father

        General Sir Charles Grey (15 March 1804 – 31 March 1870), father of Albert Grey, 4th Earl Grey

        Admiral Sir Frederick William Grey (23 August 1805 – 2 May 1878)

        Lady Mary Grey ( 2 May 1807 – 6 July 1884); married Charles Wood, 1st Viscount Halifax

        Hon. William Grey (13 May 1808 – 11 Feb 1815)

        Admiral The Hon. George Grey (16 May 1809 – 3 October 1891)

        Hon. Thomas Grey (29 Dec 1810 – 8 Jul 1826)

        Rev. Hon. John Grey ( 2 March 1812 – 11 November 1895)

        Rev. Hon. Sir Francis Richard Grey (31 March 1813 – 22 March 1890) married Lady Elizabeth Howard (1816–1891), daughter of George Howard, 6th Earl of Carlisle and Georgiana Cavendish (daughter of Georgiana Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire).

        Hon. Henry Cavendish Grey (16 October 1814 – 5 September 1880)

        Hon. William George Grey (15 February 1819 – 19 December 1865)

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Mary was frequently pregnant and during his absences in London or elsewhere Grey had a series of affairs with other women. The first, most notorious, and most significant, which antedated his engagement to his future wife, was with Georgiana Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire, whom he met at Devonshire House – the centre of Whig society in London in the 1780s and 1790s – shortly after his arrival in the capital as a young recruit to the House of Commons.

Impetuous and headstrong, Grey pursued Georgiana with persistence until she gave in to his attentions. She became pregnant by Grey in 1791, but she refused to leave her husband the duke, and live with Grey, when the duke threatened that if she did so she would never see their children again.

She went abroad with Elizabeth Foster, and on 20 February 1792 at Aix-en-Provence, gave birth to a daughter who was given the name Eliza Courtney. After their return to England in September 1793 the child was taken to Fallodon and brought up by Grey’s parents as though she were his sister.

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This affair was a significant step in the process by which he became a member of the Whig party, led by Charles James Fox.

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The Writing Life

My current writing project, a Fantasy, the third part of my trilogy on the son of Duke. It is the third in what I started when I left college. I finished the second part about 2 years ago, and so now I will wrap it up and reedit it all. It is tentatively titles, Crown in Jeopardy, the third book in the Born to Grace tale.

It opens with our hero setting up a trap for the enemies.

Chapter 2: Cynwal’s Folly

Caradoc sat atop his horse as the sounds of the horns reverberated over the camp. A call he had heard before this last few months as they battled the men of Powys. Foolish to announce there attack this way. But Caradoc’s men, those who were set to act as if they were taken unawares, rushed about, feigning a hunt for weapons and armor. Trying to convince an enemy now rushing towards them that they were unprepared.

Caradoc had only to wait and stand beneath his banner. He did not even have to order his men to counter attack. He just was to shout at the top of his lungs as he waited for the enemy to engage. Pandaemonium was the detail they were trying to convey and if Cynwal and his commanders saw what Caradoc did, then they would believe that was what was happening. That the men of Northmarch were taken unawares.

“Looks like it is working. That has to be six hundred cavalry charging this way.” Alain said. It was what reports had as there heavy armor. “Did they not think to send scouts to see how we prepared our fortresses? And what we would do to a field after dark had fallen.

“If they had seen us strew caltrops then they would know that we protect our camps. But then, we do not do so when there is light, nor half we left such behind us when we break camp. The enemy I suspect has wondered why our men have spent time cleaning the grounds that we are to leave. Telling the women and children that we have displaced that we do not want to leave them with any of our trash that they may use its value against us I hope would not work should that tale ever be told to me.”

Alain shook his head. “I suspect that Cynwal has never seen a foe spread caltrops and dig holes around a camp, and so does not think that you pick them up. None of Powys were with us when we went to the Holy Lands.”

“Knowing Arthur Argent and the family he married into, they are two cowardly for such.” Caradoc said. Then thought of Arthur’s son who was with Edward and the army going South. Gareth was punished by Edward for the deeds his father had done. They were cousins and Gareth had shown his bravery several times. Especially when defying the actions of his own father. Caradoc had to rescue the young man from his vengeful cousin when they returned to the main column. If they did so.

“I think Cynwal has gotten a few more troops then we thought.” Caradoc turned in his seat, and looked over the heads of the men crouched on their knees below him. He peered to where the false dawn showed the fields and the enemy coming from the distance. “Yes, I make out three thousand here to the front, these cavalry, and then there is at least four thousand behind.”

Alain nodded, then said, “You had planned for ten. We are prepared for this then.”

“As a Vater of Valens, you may always be ready for war, my old mentor, but I have yet to be ready for battle. No matter how many times we are about to enter it.”

“Well, here we go again. And to tell you truthfully, no Vater of Valens is ever ready for battle. No Vater ever wants battle. But we do want it to be as quickly and mercifully done as it may be. Contradictory of course, but often men say war is fought for just means.”

Caradoc frowned. It had been what he had been thinking of the previous night. “There are no just means in war. Or ends. But should Cynwal fall, then perhaps it will be worthwhile. I wonder if he thinks the same as I. That should he slay me, then he will see some resolution. Yet he must also slay Padaric.”

“Which his allies attempt,” Caradoc heard Jamus from in front of him. That they had heard. That the enemy in their coordination to attack all on the same day had attempted such. They had failed, but they had tried.

The enemy neared enough and Caradoc urged his mount forward, “MacLaughlin!” he shouted. The clansmen responded immediately. And so too did the others that had travelled with them north. More than twelve hundred voices shouted the name. Many more.

“They are not phased.” Caradoc said, though it could not be heard much over the chanting of his name. From the tents in the encampment, much larger than would hold two men, but would hold eight and ten, came forth men in armor, prepared for battle.

Alain knew what he had said, though he probably did not hear it. He said something as well. Caradoc was sure that it was along the lines that it did not matter if the enemy understood that more men were appearing in the Northmarch camp. The enemy was committed from too many directions for Cynwal to stop. And the Cavalry unit, amongst which he rode, had begun a charge that it would be near impossible to stop.

The end of Cynwal and his forces was imminent. Caradoc hoped. Caradoc would do his best to see to. It was time to end the Clanrex of Powys. Something that had been done before by a MacLaughlin and had to be done again.

“MacLaughlin” was shouted again and from where he sat, he could see that the charge of the enemy faltered as the caltrops and holes that had been dug were encountered. A counter charge would be dangerous, but there were posts on the inside of the encampment that had been put up to show where safe lanes were. Wide enough for three and four mounted men to ride out, but not more. And then a hundred paces would free them of the danger.

Caradoc though did not intend to ride just yet. Not until the other enemy had marched into the killing grounds. Then, when they were caught up and the archers of Northmarch fired into them, he would ride through the killing lanes, as would three thousand. Through and then, to back of the attackers, where he would try to push them further against their fortified camp.

That, or look for Cynwal and try and kill the man. That would bring an end to things he hoped. Finding Cynwal.

The first of the foot soldiers of Powys had reached the edge of the caltrops infested area and they were not happy. As soon as they understood the danger they began to step gingerly and avoid the harmful spikes. But they did slow tremendously. And they began to be hit with the arrows of Northmarch.

Caradoc had more than six thousand men with him. The Magus had cloaked the movements of many of the troops. Resting hidden under cover of magic during the day, and moving to join forces with Caradoc at night. The enemy only noticed that they had the troops that he had wanted them to see. Now it was a surprise to find so many Northmarchers there and fit to fight.

The enemy moved closer and all the men that Caradoc had been hiding were either at the makeshift wall, or formed up to rush forth and attack.

The enemy cavalry, Cynwal’s Clanrex standard amongst them, mired in the field to the front of the camp. Caradoc caught Avram’s attention and mouthed a question. Avram looked and held up two fingers. Beckoning the enemy to move closer. Then it was just one finger and finally, Avram turned to Caradoc and smiled widely, while waving to some of the horns to sound the attack.

Even as Caradoc heard the notes from the horns he was spurring his horse. As too did Jamus and the other bodyguards. They were watching Caradoc and saw when he had communicated by signal to Avram. Three thousand Cavalry were making there way out of the camp by way of first four exits, and then ten lanes that had been marked. The enemy there, were a little thicker as they did not have to deal with holes or caltrops to slow them. Yet they did not expect to be counterattacked.

Caradoc raised his sword and swung heavily at a man who stood at the side of the lane that his men were clearing. He was not allowed to lead this charge from the front, nor even could he hold his horse to the flank of a lane, as Jamus ensured that he was to one side of him and Vater Alain was to the other. But a man had gotten past his bodyguard and this was where Caradoc aimed.

He was not surprised when the clansman of Powys fell. Caradoc was mounted and had a great height advantage and the man was caught between two mounted warriors. The smartest thing would have been to run away. The Clanrex had done his best to stop his men from doing that once more.

The lane that Caradoc had his guardsmen travel was the one that would lead them closest to the Clanrex and his warriors. Caradoc’s spies had relayed that not all amongst the army they faced were of the Powys clan. Some where there with great reluctance to serve the Clanrex. And Caradoc hoped, should he force upon Powys another defeat, now on their own lands, perhaps those who had given the man their allegiance would think twice before giving such to another who claimed to be a part of that clan.

A much bigger and complex picture, but one that Duchess Amanda had been working towards for years. One that she had sent emissaries once more the leaders of other clans reminding them that should the area that Powys looked to as its lands have a clanrex not of the Powys clan, then friendship with Northmarch and an end to warfare might be possible.

“We have to get Cynwal. We may not get another chance. Someone must bring the Clanrex down.” Not that he had made death of the Clanrex the cause for the incursion that they had made into Powys, but it was a part of it. Forcing the Clanrex to respond until he had exhausted his resources, until he too felt the devastation that his troops had been causing in Hull. That was why they had come north and forced battle. Though, if Caradoc was to tell himself why they came, it was really to kill Cynwal. The man should have been responsible for his son. Hyfaidd was part of the ambush upon those of Northmarch. Could he really have done all that he did with out his father knowing?

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Regency History

Often in my research I keep needing to find who was leading the government and do this through every book. I thought that having the list handy would be good, and then turning it into a research webpage even better. Here is the list. After I post a few more Timeline years and write some more, I will work on the web page with notes about each PM.

The next PM I am doing is Arthur Wellesley, and I am hosting a page devoted to him and then all our period PMs at Regency Assembly Press. That page is here.

Prime Ministers of England

William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland 04/02/1783
12/19/1783
Whig
William Pitt the Younger 12/19/1783
03/14/1801
Tory
Henry Addington 1st Viscount Sidmouth, “The Doctor” 03/14/1801
05/10/1804
Tory
William Pitt the Younger 05/10/1804
01/23/1806
Tory
William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville 02/11/1806
03/31/1807
Whig
William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland 03/31/1807
10/04/1809
Tory*
Spencer Perceval 10/04/1809
05/11/1812
Tory
Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool 06/08/1812
04/09/1827
Tory
George Canning 04/10/1827
08/08/1827
Tory
Frederick John Robinson, 1st Viscount Goderich 08/31/1827
01/21/1828
Tory
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington 01/22/1828
11/16/1830
Tory
Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey
11/22/1830
07/16/1834
Whig
William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne
07/16/1834
11/14/1834
Whig
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington 11/14/1834
12/10/1834
Tory
Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet
12/10/1834
04/18/1835
Conservative
William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne
04/18/1835
08/30/1841
Whig
Tory* (Tory government, PM a Whig)

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington,

“The Iron Duke”, “The Beau”, “The Peer”, “Beau Douro” “and “Beaky“

Born 05/01/1769 Dublin, Ireland

Died 09/14/1852 Walmer Castle, Kent

Major Acts:

Roman Catholic Relief Act-removed many of the restrictions on Catholics in the UK

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The Duke of Wellington is today more famous as a soldier than as a politician. In fact, as the Prime Minister, he was known for his measures to repress reform, and his popularity sank a little during his time in office.

But he did succeed in passing the Catholic Emancipation Bill – something which caused the downfall of many earlier prime ministers – and he remains one of the best-known figures of British history.

Arthur Wellesley was born in Dublin to the Earl and Countess of Mornington.

Fatherless at an early age, and neglected by his mother, he was a reserved, withdrawn child. He failed to shine at Eton, and instead attended private classes in Brussels, followed by a military school in Angers.

Ironically, the young Wellesley had no desire for a military career. Instead he wished to pursue his love of music. Following his mother’s wishes, however, he joined a Highland regiment.

Wellesley fought at Flanders in 1794, (Age 25) and directed the campaign in India in 1796, (Age 27) where his elder brother was Governor General. Knighted for his efforts, he returned to England in 1805.

The following year he was elected Member of Parliament for Rye, and within a year was appointed Chief Secretary of Ireland by the Duke of Portland. He continued with his military career despite his parliamentary duties, fighting campaigns in Portugal and France, and being made commander of the British Army in the Peninsular War.

He was given the title Duke of Wellington in 1814, and went on to command his most celebrated campaigns in the Napoleonic Wars, with final victory at Waterloo in 1815.

On returning to Britain, Wellington was feted as a hero, formally honoured, and presented with both an estate in Hampshire and a fortune of £400,000.

After the Battle of Waterloo, Wellington became Commander in Chief of the army in occupied France until November 1818.

He later returned to England and Parliament, and joined Lord Liverpool’s government in 1819 as Master-General of the Ordnance. He undertook a number of diplomatic visits overseas, including a trip to Russia.

Heading for Parliament

In 1828, after twice being overlooked in favour of Canning and Goderich,

Wellington was finally invited by King George IV to form his own government and set about forming his Cabinet.

As prime minister, Wellington was very conservative, yet one of his first achievements was overseeing Catholic emancipation in 1829, the granting of almost full civil rights to Catholics in the United Kingdom.

Feelings ran very high on the issue. Wellington persuaded the King only by his threat of resignation. Lord Winchilsea, an opponent of the bill, claimed that by granting freedoms to Catholics Wellington “treacherously plotted the destruction of the Protestant constitution”.

As a result, Wellington and Winchilsea fought a duel in Battersea Park in March 1829. The two deliberately missed each other in firing, and honour was satisfied.

Wellington had a much less enlightened position on parliamentary reform. He defended rule by the elite and refused to expand the political franchise.

His fear of mob rule was strengthened by the riots and sabotage that followed rising rural unemployment. His opposition to reform caused his popularity to plummet to such an extent that crowds gathered to throw missiles at his London home.

Specifically his visit to the opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway(see my article-ed) in September of 1830 where the death of Husskisson ensued, and then his refusal to attend the man’s funeral led to the fall of his government.

The Government was defeated in the Commons, and Wellington resigned, to be replaced by Earl Grey. Wellington continued to fight reform in opposition, though he finally consented to the Great Reform Bill in 1832.

Two years later he refused a second invitation to form a government, and instead joined Peel’s ministry as Foreign Secretary. He later became Leader of the House of Lords, and upon Peel’s resignation in 1846, retired from politics.

Marshalling the troops

But in 1848 he organised a military force to protect London against possible Chartist violence at the large meeting at Kennington Common.

‘The Iron Duke’ died in September 1852 after a series of seizures. After lying in state in London, he was buried in St Paul’s Cathedral, London.

The Wellington Arch still stands in London’s Hyde Park. He also gave his name to the humble Wellington boot. And of course we have Been Wellington to remember him by as well.

First Ministry

01/22/1828                        11/16/1830        

Office
Name
Term
First Lord of the Treasury

Leader of the House of Lords

The Duke of Wellington
January 1828 – November 1830
Lord Chancellor
The Lord Lyndhust
January 1828 – November 1830
Lord President of the Council
The Earl Bathurst
January 1828 – November 1830
Lord Privy Seal
The Lord Ellenborough

The Earl of Rosslyn

January 1828 – June 1829

June1829 – November 1830

Chancellor of the Exchequer
Henry Goulburn
January 1828 – November 1830
Home Secretary

Leader of the House of Commons

Robert Peel
January 1828 – November 1830
Foreign Secretary
The Earl of Dudley

The Earl of Aberdeen

January 1828 – June 1828

June 1828 – November 1830

Secretary of State for War and the Colonies
William Huskisson

Sir George Murray

January 1828 – May 1828

May 1828 – November 18

First Lord of the Admiralty
The Viscount Melville
September 1828 – November 1830
Master-General of the Ordnance
Marquess of Anglesey

The Viscount Beresford         

January 1828 – April 1828

April 1828 – November 1830

President of the Board of Trade
Charles Grant         

William Vesey-Fitzgerald         

John Charles Herries         

January 1828 – June 1828

June 1828 – February 1830

February 1830 – November 1830

President of the Board of Control
Charles Watkin Williams-Wynn

The Viscount Melville         

The Lord Ellenborough         

January 1828 – July 1828

July 1828 – September 1828

September 1828 – November 1830

Master of the Mint
John Charles Herries
January 1828 – November 1830
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
The Earl of Aberdeen

Charles Arbuthnot

January 1828 – June 1828

June 1828 – November 1830

First Commissioner of Woods and Forests
Charles Arbuthnot

Viscount Lowther

February 1828 – June 1828

June 1828 – November 1830

Paymaster of the Forces
William Vesey-Fitzgerald         

John Calcraft         

January 1828 – July 1828

July 1828 – November 1830

Secretary at War
Viscount Palmerston

Sir Henry Hardinge         

Lord Francis Leveson-Gower

January 1828 – May 1828

May 1828 – July 1830

July 1830 – November 1830

Second Ministry

11/14/1834                        12/10/1834

Office
Name
Date
Prime Minister

Secretary of State for the Home Department

Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs

Secretary of State for War and the Colonies

Leader of the House of Lords

The Duke of Wellington
17 November 1834 – 9 December 1834
Chancellor of the Exchequer
The Lord Denman
15 November 1834-9 December
Lord Chancellor
The Lord Lyndhurst
21 November 1834-9 December
Lords Commissioners of the Treasury
The Duke of Wellington

The Earl of Rosslyn         

The Lord Ellenborough

Lord Maryborough

Sir John Beckett

Joseph Planta

21 November 1834-9 December

Family

Arthur and Kitty had two sons and adopted 4 children. (See below for more on Kitty)

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After his first Cabinet meeting as PM; “An extraordinary affair. I gave them their orders and they wanted to stay and discuss them.”

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Catherine Sarah Dorothea “Kitty” Pakenham, the sister of one of his generals, Edward Pakenham. who died leading such famous units as the 95th Rifles (Sharp!) and 93rd Highlanders at the Battle of New Orleans in the American war of 1812 which was over by the time the battle had been fought in 1815, but because of communications then, they had not gotten the word.

Wellesley and Kitty might have been hot and heavy at first, but he was turned away when he did not have any prospects and she found another to love. Who, when he found that Wellesley was still interested bowed out. When Kitty and Wellesley did marry, their marriage was not one of love on his side. Though, Kitty did love the Duke. She died in 1831

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GIVEAWAY

Do you know about our Giveaway this week? If you answer in the comments there, that you have an idea, or just comment (not just a HI, but which research track you like and why) I am giving away an eBook in your favorite format, ePub, Mobi, or PDF, etc. You can choose from 1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic4-2012-07-7-06-20.jpgThe End of the World, 1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic3-2012-07-7-06-20.jpgThe Shattered Mirror, 1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-07-7-06-20.jpgColonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence, or the one I think you will enjoy the most, 1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic1-2012-07-7-06-20.jpgJane Austen and Ghosts. (And if you want to ready the 1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic2-2012-07-7-06-20.jpgTrolling books instead, just mention that.

The giveaway will last through Sunday the 8th, at which time I will pick a winner and announce your feedback and what it all means for future posting, as well as the winner on the following Monday.

And then,

Are you A RAPper or a RAPscallion?

The Writing Life

My current writing project, a Fantasy, the third part of my trilogy on the son of Duke. It is the third in what I started when I left college. I finished the second part about 2 years ago, and so now I will wrap it up and reedit it all. It is tentatively titles, Crown in Jeopardy, the third book in the Born to Grace tale.

It opens with our hero setting up a trap for the enemies.

Chapter 1: Bait (to the end)

“Caradoc, everyone is here.” Jamus said from outside the tent. Or at least the small portion of the tent where he rested. Enough room for his cot, and to swing his legs over the side of it.

Coming. His feet had been back in his boots since he had cooled them down with the water to wash them. He hoisted himself from the cot and getting his legs firmly under him, not instantly for he carried nearly two hundred pounds of armor, he then grabbed his sword and strode out of the tent.

His bodyguard awaited him and the commanders of all the troops were there as well. William and most of the Magus were to one side. William turned to Francis, his closest associate. “No enemies, or spies still, my lord.”

That had been a concern, since they had left the column of Northmarch, that their subterfuge would be found out. It still had not, so that was a blessing of Aer. “Now is the time to speak if you have questions. We think that tomorrow, first light, I should guess, will be when this is resolved.”

The other commanders nodded. No one should have a question. They had talked it through for days. And if what was to come did, it would be how they would proceed as well. The best time to attack a camp is at first light. Men are awake and want to piss, or want to eat and rub the sleep from their eyes. Start a fire and get something hot in them. Then there would be enough light, if you were an attacker, to see where your enemy was. Attack in the night, and you had to hope for a moon to see by.

William and the Magus had made sure that at night, it was as dark as if there had been no moon, no stars, and no torches to guide a man, each night. Cynwal’s commanders would have told him that it would be impossible to attack under such circumstances, and Pincus relayed that they had done so on one evening.

“Then to your beds and sleep and rest this night. Tomorrow we are sure to fight. Get your meals tonight as well, for there will likely be no food in the morning. William, the magus will have to be ready to deflect an archery attack, and General Frederick, the scouts, be sure that they do not get caught when the enemy attack. For as we would, the enemy would surely try to sneak upon them and cut their throats. They are not sacrifices and should they be wary, they should survive and can fight during the attack.” That was one of the most worrisome parts of the entire operation.

If he were going to attack a war camp, then he would send men to kill the sentries. That would mask the approach. Here the sentries knew that was something that might happen and the Magus were going to do their best to see that the sentries were not taken unawares. Also, Cynwal was certain that he outnumbered Caradoc’s force near five times. He would be pleased at the advantage that surprise gave him in attack, but it was not so needed.

Superiority of numbers would go a long way towards ensuring victory. That was always an advantage that a commander wished for. Again, Caradoc thought, it disvalued the worth of a man. When one thought in terms that having more men in your command than the enemy, and somehow that greater number meant that you would inflict more death and less would be caused to your own side, may have been a blessing for you, but it also meant that you just regarded your men as so many numbers. Did you care then about how happy there were in their marriage, or that they had a new born daughter? That there parents had been married thirty years? None of that mattered except that you had twice or more times the men to hand as your enemy did.

Caradoc hated this job more then he liked it. He was a well paid murderer. That had become the task of the lords of the land. Not overseeing their people in peace and battling a truer enemy, the weather. One less predictable than a man.

Caradoc shook his head and sent the men away. He might have thought to proceed about the camp and see how all were doing. Instead, he listened to reports to ensure that all were ready. He got his own hot meal and then once more, lay down on his cot. At least in the midst of his army, he did not have to stand a watch. He would be woken early though. He was to inspect the came and sure that the moments before dawn, when it was hoped they lured Cynwal to them, that the camp was perceived to hold only twelve hundred men.

When he had woken, relaxed he found from his sleep, he was joined by the Magus Francis. William was sleeping as much as he could. “We have cast our spells and done all we can think to confuse the enemy.”

“And they have given no indication that they have sussed us out. They think all is as it should be with twelve hundred men having invaded their country. We have done well. You the Magus, have done well.”

“Thank you lord. The ArchMagus has said you have always been generous with your praise, but that it is also well earned.” Francis said.

Caradoc smiled, “I hope so. I hope that is what is said of me. I think it, of course, but you are never sure that is what is said about you. Now, are you all rested. Much of our success when we are engaged will have those of us without magic relying on you with the power.”

“We are rested. Near every magus in the north that was with the Army is here with us. Lady Miriam and only two others remain with Prince Edward.”

Caradoc was aware of that as well. He knew the plan, and he knew where the players he had control of were. His side of the board. And with the aid of the spies of the Atorane who were a part of Cynwal’s army, he knew more about the enemy then hey did of him, he hoped.

“There is one of you maintaining the spell now?” They had an illusion cast about all of the camp, and they knew that it worked as what one saw from outside the camp was much different than what was inside the camp. And what one was able to have followed by watching the patrols that Caradoc had sent out as well.

“Two my lord. As we have gotten closer to when you think the attack will come, we have had much more work to do.”

“Show me.” Caradoc instructed. It was needful as he had to know where the efforts of the Magus were being utilized. He and his commanders needed to prepare for where they suspected the enemy would attack, and where he wanted his men to respond. They had a small wall erected about the camp. Since Landing, armies had made war camps with temporary defenses, and then there had been kingdoms that did not. Those kingdoms who did, seemed to have lasted longer than those that did not.

Northmarch was a kingdom that did erect such walls. But 1200 men did not make the walls as if they were full regiments. They were a raiding force. At least the illusion was such that they had weak points in their walls.

It did not take long for Francis to walk him through the camp and show him where the Magus were stationed, or anticipated that they would need to work their magic. After he had finished with Francis, then it was a chance to walk with Avram and Frederick. Both of whom were then awake. Both of whom had been leaders for far longer than he, but it had been Caradoc’s plan to travel north, and they had been deferential to him since Larsent Bridge.

“We are ready. You spend a great deal of time agonizing over whether we are ready before every battle.” Avram said.

“It is time for you to go back to the Atorane and start your family, or to show them that you are your own man and take a wife with you from here. I think perhaps as good as you are, you may need some new blood amongst you.” Caradoc teased, but there was some truth there. The Atorane was almost entirely comprised of the Hovite religion. They needed blood from elsewhere in the world. Just as the clans married amongst other clans, the Hovites did not need to trade their identity away, but they needed more genes in the mix. That was well thought amongst the tenets of the Captain. No marriage closer than that of a second cousin. And no community with fewer than 100 patriarchs.

“You comment on whether I do not worry enough? I worry, yet once I am sure that a thing is correct and well attended to, I put it from my mind. The men who have that responsibility will take care of it. As to my taking a wife with me back to the Atorane, I have thought that perhaps I might. There is a lady amongst the woman of Princess Sarah I think quite catching. She has been after me since we all returned to Luckston. I think you know her as well.”

Lady ### had been a lover of Caradoc’s once. But when he had returned to Luckston and Clarisse, he had not looked at the girl. She had looked to Caradoc a few times and that had been uncomfortable. But he kept his distance. Not because he was afraid of what Clarisse would do to him knowing that he had a former lover about. Because he was worried what Clarisse would do to the girl.

Clarisse said she bore no grudges, but that would not be the entire truth. Clarisse was a hellion when wronged. “I wish you well of that, my friend. She, I think, would shake things up in the Atorane. And then, you will have a very beautiful wife also. I can see her, the wife of a Medbar of the Atorane and a respected general. She will make quite an impression on Hovite society.”

Avram laughed. “You thought I was joking. Caradoc, I am serious. I have thought to wed her and take her to our homeland for just that reason. We need new perspective and most women of court would be overwhelmed by the Hovite woman back in the Atorane. Lady #### won’t.”

Well Caradoc could agree with that. She would not be shunted aside, but would be in the forefront of any decision or event. As the wife of Avram and the mother of his sons, she would be right in the middle of things, just as he would when he did return to the country.

“I have to marry her in any event. It would not be decent to let things proceed without doing so. Your Aer would think me churlish.” Alain laughed from where he walked.

“Oh, don’t mind me. Valens will take care of any child, whether a father claims him or not. But to have begotten a child on a lady of the court, and related to the king of Falchon. You, general just can not stop playing with hot water.”

Caradoc would have laughed but Francis stiffened. “They come! Less than ten minutes.”

That was all the leaders needed and they all began to hurry away quietly sounding the alarm, as the other Magus did as well. They would be ready much sooner than the ten minutes. Caradoc just mouthed as he went to mount his horse. “It begins. The end is now started.”

Read Full Post »

Regency History

Often in my research I keep needing to find who was leading the government and do this through every book. I thought that having the list handy would be good, and then turning it into a research webpage even better. Here is the list. After I post a few more Timeline years and write some more, I will work on the web page with notes about each PM.

The next PM I am doing is Frederick John Robinson, and I am hosting a page devoted to him and then all our period PMs at Regency Assembly Press. That page is here.

Prime Ministers of England

William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland 04/02/1783
12/19/1783
Whig
William Pitt the Younger 12/19/1783
03/14/1801
Tory
Henry Addington 1st Viscount Sidmouth, “The Doctor” 03/14/1801
05/10/1804
Tory
William Pitt the Younger 05/10/1804
01/23/1806
Tory
William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville 02/11/1806
03/31/1807
Whig
William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland 03/31/1807
10/04/1809
Tory*
Spencer Perceval 10/04/1809
05/11/1812
Tory
Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool 06/08/1812
04/09/1827
Tory
George Canning 04/10/1827
08/08/1827
Tory
Frederick John Robinson, 1st Viscount Goderich 08/31/1827
01/21/1828
Tory
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
01/22/1828
11/16/1830
Tory
Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey
11/22/1830
07/16/1834
Whig
William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne
07/16/1834
11/14/1834
Whig
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
11/14/1834
12/10/1834
Tory
Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet
12/10/1834
04/18/1835
Conservative
William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne
04/18/1835
08/30/1841
Whig
Tory* (Tory government, PM a Whig)

Frederick John Robinson, 1st Viscount Goderich, 1st Earl of Ripon

“Prosperity Robinson”, “Goody Goderich” and “The Blubberer“

Born 11/01/1782 London

Died 01/28/1859 Putney Heath, London

Major Acts:

Seems to be the second shortest serving Prime Minister. No great acts in so short a time.

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Viscount Goderich’s time as prime minister lasted only a few days longer than his predecessor Canning.

Goderich was chosen by King George IV over the favourite for the post, the Duke of Wellington. Goderich seemed a good prospect as Prime Minister, having served ably as Chancellor of the Exchequer under Lord Liverpool.

But Goderich lacked support among his colleagues and in his party, and he was not up to the task of running a quarrelling Cabinet.

Goderich had difficulty in coping practically and emotionally. He resigned after four months in office, before he had achieved anything of note. His time is nearly as short as Canning’s in office. (A Prime Minister of fifteen years, Lord Liverpool, and then 2 short termers in a row.)

He did return to hold political office some years later to serve under Earl Grey and Robert Peel.

He did serve under four other Prime Ministers and his son also served as a Cabinet Minister.

Lord and Lady Ripon are buried in the memorial chapel at All Saints Church, Nocton.

(IMHO, he is the Brad Pitt lookalike amongst the Prime Ministers. See the sketch below)

Ministry

08/31/1827                        01/21/1828        

Lord Goderich – First Lord of the Treasury and Leader of the House of Lords

Lord Lyndhurst – Lord Chancellor

The Duke of Portland – Lord President of the Council

The Earl of Carlisle – Lord Privy Seal

The Marquess of Lansdowne – Secretary of State for the Home Department

The Earl of Dudley – Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs

William Huskisson – Secretary of State for War and the Colonies and Leader of the House of Commons

J. C. Herries – Chancellor of the Exchequer

The Marquess of Anglesey – Master-General of the Ordnance

Charles Grant – President of the Board of Trade and Treasurer of the Navy

Charles Watkin Williams-Wynn – President of the Board of Control

William Sturges Bourne – First Commissioner of Woods and Forests

Lord Bexley – Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster

Viscount Palmerston – Secretary at War

Family

Lord Ripon married Lady Sarah Albinia Louisa, daughter of Robert Hobart, 4th Earl of Buckinghamshire, in 1814. He died in Putney Heath, London, in January 1859, aged 76, and was succeeded by his only son, George, Viscount Goderich. He became a noted Liberal statesman and cabinet minister and was created Marquess of Ripon in 1871. The Countess of Ripon died in April 1867, aged 74

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“There was no one good in this life that had not with it some concomitant evil”

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GIVEAWAY

Do you know about our Giveaway this week? If you answer in the comments there, that you have an idea, or just comment (not just a HI, but which research track you like and why) I am giving away an eBook in your favorite format, ePub, Mobi, or PDF, etc. You can choose from 1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic4-2012-07-4-09-51.jpgThe End of the World, 1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic3-2012-07-4-09-51.jpgThe Shattered Mirror, 1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-07-4-09-51.jpgColonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence, or the one I think you will enjoy the most, 1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic1-2012-07-4-09-51.jpgJane Austen and Ghosts. (And if you want to ready the 1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic2-2012-07-4-09-51.jpgTrolling books instead, just mention that.

The giveaway will last through Sunday the 8th, at which time I will pick a winner and announce your feedback and what it all means for future posting, as well as the winner on the following Monday.

And then,

Are you A RAPper or a RAPscallion?

The Writing Life

My current writing project, a Fantasy, the third part of my trilogy on the son of Duke. It is the third in what I started when I left college. I finished the second part about 2 years ago, and so now I will wrap it up and reedit it all. It is tentatively titles, Crown in Jeopardy, the third book in the Born to Grace tale.

It opens with our hero setting up a trap for the enemies.

Chapter 1: Bait continued

That was the long game that was played. That Cynwal would get information, as they were sure that spies and traitors relayed to the man, suggesting that there were reasons for Caradoc and his contingent to leave the main column and become marauders in the north. Yet those same spies were sure to report that Caradoc had no more than twelve hundred men.

A group that had to be reckoned with, but could move fast. That would make camp at night that was sizable enough that there would need to be several thousand to attack. About the size that Cynwal had still to command after he had retreated across the border to his lands. Several thousand. Not more than six, if Caradoc’s spies were correct, as well as the magus that William employed.

Caradoc believed that rhe Hovites though were probably more accurate. Avram’s countryman, Capain Pincus had established a means to dialogue with them near daily. And the last report was that Cynwal had started to return with that force to confront Caradoc. That was what was driving towards them now that the scouts reported. That William and his Magus had focused on. Six thousand Powys clansmen coming to attack. One would speculate that they were outnumbered about five to one.

Which is what Caradoc wanted the enemy to think.

Avram was in charge of finding a camp for the night and usually had one identified every mile or two, just waiting for the orders to halt and bring everyone on the march together. Caradoc looked forward to finding the spot, after he gave the order to halt for the night, so that he could dismount and get out of his boots. Then have apply liniment to his aching muscles. He prayed they would help. He would have to put his boots back on quickly for there would be little warning if an attack came at night, or early in the morning, and he would be sleeping in them. In his armor as well, else Jamus and the bodyguards would have a fit.

They took seriously the odds that they were outnumbered so heavily. Even though they knew many details of Caradoc’s plan. Then took all of the matter quite seriously. They were nor too afraid, but Caradoc was sleeping in his armor, with his boots on until they were safe across the border into Northmarch and in a castle as well.

“I do not know that all this posturing is necessary all the time. You do not sleep in armor or your boots!” he said to William, as they dismounted where men were erecting tents for them that night.

“No, yet I do have some leather here that I wear. I do not want to wear chainmail, though you know I have done so. It is too heavy.”

Caradoc said, “I thought you complained that it would interfere with your spells.”

“Some. You know if I wanted to levitate, all that extra weight means I have to use a lot more power to get off the ground and go higher. I causes more fatigue then.” William said. “And sleeping in your boots. That is just foolish. It would take you all of a ten seconds to put your feet in your boots if the alarm is sounded.”

“What spells do you know to take away the pains?”

“Oh,” William looked at him, “I can ask one of the Magus who is good at healing. You know I can stop blood spilling out of you, but otherwise, I am not much of a healer. If you have aches, or worse, well I could ask Miriam for some help. She is much better than I, but if it is serious, then I expect she would tell the princess and then we will be up all night as Clarisse bothers Miriam, who will bother me, and I will have to fetch you and relay what you say back to Miriam for Clarisse, who will just ask something else.”

Caradoc held up his hand. “Yes, I know how that works. Archibald, I need to get these boots off quick and if we can find some water to soak them in…” William was chuckling as he went away to the tent that was already raised for him. Everytime they camped, William’s tent had been up first, while Caradoc waited for his to be raised.

It was several times bigger than any other in the camp. Even though Caradoc had use of less space than even William. But still, he was the commander and his tent rose after the ArchMagus. Something was wrong and he would see that when they left Powys, he was treated with more respect. That he was able to take off his boots and relax at the end of the day quickly. He did not have long to do so, since the other commanders would come to report, get orders, and then after the men had built the defenses of the camp, Caradoc would then have to tour them. If he had a half hour of peace before several hours in which he was tasked with numerous and onerous duties, he would think he had reached the right hand of the gods as a reward.

All those that paid taxes which supported his efforts in this did not realize how hard he worked when he was in battle, at war. Which he had been for years continuously, it seemed. It was at these moments that he began to think of larger issues. War was tearing apart the kingdoms and was it right to include the freemen, and peasants in that war? They paid their taxes so they need not fight and leave their families unless it was the worst of situations.

So did Cynwal and his people have to kill so many as they left the lands of Hull, or raise terror upon the freemen when they had invaded? They did not need to have done so. The armies of Northmarch did meet them in battle, eventually. The freemen surrendered their food and supplies when they had them to the invaders.

Now Caradoc used similar tactics to force the enemy to battle. The taking of the hands of those serfs here who opposed them. It was a cruelty. Against men who just wanted to live their lives and protect their families. It was evil. Caradoc knew it.

It forced Cynwal to return and plan to kill Caradoc and his men. That was the need. That was the reason those of Northmarch waged a war this way. To coerce the clanrex to fight.

Saying who started the horrendous deed would not be of consolation to the man who had no hand. It would not replace the entire family that had been slaughtered. But if Caradoc could succeed to his purpose, then perhaps he could end the madness for a time. A generation, two, that would be enough.

Individually the sacrifices would not ever be worth it. A man losing his hand because those born lucky, into powerful families, played a game of chess with his life, would never believe that he had lost his hand in a noble cause. Caradoc though knew that the loss of a few hands if it would later save thousands of lives for years had a worth and value. But it was not a cost he had fully paid for yet. Cynwal still needed to be defeated. Cynwal, Arthur, Danel, and their many other enemies needed to be defeated so that peace could be restored.

There had been border raids and small actions for the last several decades. Not until the army of Northmarch marched to the Holy Lands because of Archpriest Dubh’s visions. Visions that allowed Caradoc to free Archpriest Artorius from the Protector’s dungeons. Visions that allowed them to retrieve relics for safekeeping here in the north.

That had been the first coordinated action of a Northmarcher army in years. And it had been successful in battle and in its mission, thanks to Caradoc. The thing that could be held of the other kingdoms in the North was that they had not fielded large armies either in the decades since Northmarch last fought Powys.

Perhaps that was why things were carrying on so long? No one remembered how long and how hard a war was. Caradoc laughed at himself for that notion. Too many remembered how hard and long war could be. Especially he and the other veterans of the southern campaign. They had taken years to march South and return. Caradoc only avoiding the last leg of the march by sailing north in haste with Edward after his marriage to the daughter of the King of Falchon. That had shaved months off the return and saw to the relics being brought north that much quicker.

And saw to Caradoc being sent by the king on a mission once more. If King Richard hadn’t, then perhaps Clarisse would not have followed him, and they would not have fallen in love as they had. But then, what would have happened at Larsent Bridge? If Clarisse was not in love with him, and he only treated her as the Princess of Northmarch. If he had not needed to rescue her as badly as he had.

Once Edward had been freed, would Caradoc have had to fight to free Clarisse? Would that have mattered if she was a prisoner of her betrothed? He could not play these games of what could have been for long. Hyfaidd had violated treaties and he would have had to have been attacked. And with Lady Miriam having snuck her way into the keep, there was no question about trying to free the Princess. But Caradoc might not have charged the enemy and battled through the ford like a man possessed. The troops still talked of that day.

He had not given much thought to his own safety on that ride, and it had shown in the risks he had taken, and the fear amongst those who had fallen to his sword. The men of Powys paid terribly for Hyfaidd’s mistakes and animosity. They were still paying.

Caradoc reflected that clan wars had a terrible history. Even amongst his own clan and family. But it had been more than two centuries since a MacLaughlin had waged such warfare. The first night that they were away from the Northmarch host, he had called every clansmen that travelled with him. Then he had told them that he invoked blood feud against Cynwal and all his clan. Caradoc had told his people that he would not rest until the line of Cynwal and all his blood was annihilated. That such a family would either be eradicated, or he would die trying to rid the world of them.

Cynwal would either have to die, and any heirs he had, or submit to Caradoc. Caradoc then could retract his oath. But others came and stood and pledged as he had. Until every clansman amongst the force had stated as had Caradoc. And it was more than MacLaughlin that did so. Ross had spoken as had Stuart. Every man who had been born of the Clans had pledged the same oath.

It did not mean that the other clans were forced to wage a blood feud as well, but it sure gave them reason to. There were seventeen clans represented that night. Even some of Powys blood for the borders were porous. And Clans were large collections of families. Not all families agreed with their fathers, and with Powys actions of the last few months, they had to question if the Cynwal of Powys had been a wise and just leader. Even though these men had owed allegiance to Northmarch for generations.

Read Full Post »

Regency History

Often in my research I keep needing to find who was leading the government and do this through every book. I thought that having the list handy would be good, and then turning it into a research webpage even better. Here is the list. After I post a few more Timeline years and write some more, I will work on the web page with notes about each PM.

The next PM I am doing is George Canning, and I am hosting a page devoted to him and then all our period PMs at Regency Assembly Press. That page is here.

Prime Ministers of England

William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland 04/02/1783
12/19/1783
Whig
William Pitt the Younger 12/19/1783
03/14/1801
Tory
Henry Addington 1st Viscount Sidmouth, “The Doctor” 03/14/1801
05/10/1804
Tory
William Pitt the Younger 05/10/1804
01/23/1806
Tory
William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville 02/11/1806
03/31/1807
Whig
William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland 03/31/1807
10/04/1809
Tory*
Spencer Perceval 10/04/1809
05/11/1812
Tory
Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool 06/08/1812
04/09/1827
Tory
George Canning 04/10/1827
08/08/1827
Tory
Frederick John Robinson, 1st Viscount Goderich
08/31/1827
01/21/1828
Tory
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
01/22/1828
11/16/1830
Tory
Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey
11/22/1830
07/16/1834
Whig
William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne
07/16/1834
11/14/1834
Whig
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
11/14/1834
12/10/1834
Tory
Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet
12/10/1834
04/18/1835
Conservative
William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne
04/18/1835
08/30/1841
Whig
Tory* (Tory government, PM a Whig)

George Canning

“The Cicero of the British Senate” and “The Zany of Debate”

Born 04/11/1770 Marylebone, London

Died 08/08/1827 Chiswick House, Middlesex

Major Acts:

Was shortest serving Prime Minister. Earlier, in 1809 he dueled Lord Castlereagh and lost

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Popular, witty and intelligent, Canning gained an early political following as an excellent public speaker. He was one of the first politicians to campaign heavily in the country, making many speeches outside Parliament. He died suddenly in office just 119 days after taking up the post. It is the shortest duration of a Prime Minister in history.

He was an enthusiastic follower of Pitt the Younger, resigning from his post as Paymaster General in 1801 when Pitt resigned as prime minister.

Canning was known for his opposition to parliamentary reform and his advocacy of Catholic emancipation.

In 1807 Canning was made Foreign Secretary under the Duke of Portland. His wife, Joan was the sister of the Duchess of Portland. His greatest success was out maneuvering Napoleon at Copenhagen by seizing the Danish navy. (Not that Canning commanded this battle, but ordered and planned the campaign as Foreign Secretary.)

But he also quarreled badly with the War Minister, Lord Castlereagh, over the deployment of troops. When Castlereagh discovered in September 1809 that Canning had made a deal with the Duke of Portland to have him removed from office, he was furious.

Demanding redress, he challenged Canning to a duel, which was fought on 21 September 1809. Canning had never before fired a pistol and completely missed, whilst Castlereagh wounded Canning in the thigh. Both men resigned as a result of the incident.

To Portugal and back

A few weeks later, Canning was disappointed to be passed over as the choice for Prime Minister in favor of Spencer Perceval.

His anger was such that he refused a high profile post in Perceval’s government. However, after a brief stint as ambassador to Portugal (1814-1816), he returned to join the government as President of the Board of Control.

He later replaced his old rival as Foreign Secretary in Lord Liverpool’s government after Castlereagh’s suicide in 1822. Once again, he made a successful Foreign Secretary, especially in preventing South America from falling into French hands.

Canning replaced Liverpool as Prime Minister on 10 April 1827, and set about forming a coalition with the Whigs under Lord Lansdowne, even though Canning was a Tory.

But on 8 August 1827, Canning died from pneumonia at Chiswick House, after spending barely five months in office. His last words were ‘Spain and Portugal’.

He has come to be regarded by some as a ‘lost leader’, with much speculation about what would have happened had he lived.

Ministry

04/10/1827                        08/08/1827        

George Canning – First Lord of the Treasury, Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons

Lord Lyndhurst – Lord Chancellor

Lord Harrowby – Lord President of the Council

The Duke of Portland – Lord Privy Seal

William Sturges Bourne – Secretary of State for the Home Department

Lord Dudley – Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs

Lord Goderich – Secretary of State for War and the Colonies and Leader of the House of Lords

William Huskisson – President of the Board of Trade and Treasurer of the Navy

Charles Williams-Wynn – President of the Board of Control

Lord Bexley – Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster

Lord Palmerston – Secretary at War

Lord Lansdowne – Minister without Portfolio

Changes

  • May, 1827 – Lord Carlisle, the First Commissioner of Woods and Forests, enters the Cabinet
  • July, 1827 – The Duke of Portland becomes a minister without portfolio. Lord Carlisle succeeds him as Lord Privy Seal. W. S. Bourne succeeds Carlisle as First Commissioner of Woods and Forests. Lord Lansdowne succeeds Bourne as Home Secretary. George Tierney, the Master of the Mint, enters the cabinet

Family

Canning was married to Joan, daughter of Major General John Scott on July 8th, 1800. Joan was created Viscountess Canning, on January 28, 1828, six months after the death of George.

They had 4 children:

George Charles Canning (1801–1820), died from consumption

William Pitt Canning (1802–1828), died from drowning in Madeira, Portugal

Harriet Canning (1804–1876), married the 1st Marquess of Clanricarde

Charles Canning (later 2nd Viscount Canning and 1st Earl Canning) (1812–1862)

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“The happiness of constant occupation is infinite.”

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GIVEAWAY

Do you know about our Giveaway this week? If you answer in the comments there, that you have an idea, or just comment (not just a HI, but which research track you like and why) I am giving away an eBook in your favorite format, ePub, Mobi, or PDF, etc. You can choose from 1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic4-2012-07-2-07-58.jpgThe End of the World, 1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic3-2012-07-2-07-58.jpgThe Shattered Mirror, 1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2012-07-2-07-58.jpgColonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence, or the one I think you will enjoy the most, 1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic1-2012-07-2-07-58.jpgJane Austen and Ghosts. (And if you want to ready the 1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic2-2012-07-2-07-58.jpgTrolling books instead, just mention that.

The giveaway will last through Sunday the 8th, at which time I will pick a winner and announce your feedback and what it all means for future posting, as well as the winner on the following Monday.

And then,

Are you A RAPper or a RAPscallion?

The Writing Life

My current writing project, a Fantasy, the third part of my trilogy on the son of Duke. It is the third in what I started when I left college. I finished the second part about 2 years ago, and so now I will wrap it up and reedit it all. It is tentatively titles, Crown in Jeopardy, the third book in the Born to Grace tale.

It opens with our hero setting up a trap for the enemies.

Chapter 1: Bait

Caradoc was sore. After days riding, or walking with the men, he was sore. And he wished he wasn’t. When he let his mind dwell on the pains he had, then all he could think of was when he would have a moment to rest. Or a period of time so long that the pains would go away again. He would have to rest for days, though. He did not see that happening any time soon.

And he missed Clarisse. A lot. Not that he missed her for nights when they would sleep together. Which he could not actually say that he didn’t missed. Because that would be untrue. He wanted to spend a lot of time in a bed chamber with her and this war was not helping that.

He missed talking to her, or touching his hand to hers. Little things such as sharing a cup of mead at night. Or after they made love and rested, just holding her.

Caradoc did not know when he would see her again, either. With the war, tearing apart the entire kingdom, it could be months, years, or never. He was not so sure that he would survive the war. He had enemies. A lot of them apparently.

Men who wanted revenge on him for his successes. Men who wanted him dead because he had been too skillful in supporting the Argent’s. Arthur Argent had placed a bounty on his head, and the soldiers under his command said that it was higher than what the rebellious Duke had placed on the King’s head.

Caradoc did not want to dissuade the men about that. The truth was though, that Arthur may have wanted him dead, but he would pay more to see that the heirs of King Richard were first caught and killed.

And that led Caradoc to work on his current mission. For two days after they had left Hull the men under his command had marched south. Any who had thought to spy on his command would be sure that they were traveling to join the Argent forces and take back the kingdom, or those parts that had been seized by Duke Arthur.

Edward had been against it. Edward still was not as he had been when they had journeyed to the Holy Lands. And then the night that they had started on this mission, word had come that the King had died. That had made Edward worse than before, Caradoc felt.

“Lord, better concentrate, it’s been a week and they have to know we are close.” Avram said. Caradoc gave the man a bitter look. He should have gone with the Edward, as Frederick and Alain also should have done. Paxton was the only one who went South with the Prince. And he had taken five minutes to talk to Caradoc before the larger group of warriors continued to the south.

“I don’t like it. The Prince has acted selfish and scared. And you lot are off on another adventure and I have to tend the man. I am not some childsitter but you would have me act as one.”

Caradoc could not fault that. “You travel with my wife, Great Captain. I have put a lot of trust and faith in you and those under your command.”

Paxton said, “You are very right I travel with your wife, who will throw crockery as easily at my head as yours when she finds that you have gone back north. When she finds that this was your plan all along and that the messenger that you are going to pretend rides in tomorrow forces you to hare away.”

Avram smiled, “There will be a messenger. It will not be pretend. Just that he will have a message that we wrote a few minutes ago, instead of one that the Duchess of Hull has written.”

Alain drank his jack of ale, and looked at Frederick, “Too much subterfuge. There are probably spies in the camp. Spies with the soldiers. There always are such. But you need not hide your true task from all.”

“If we told Edward, do you not think in a moment of weakness he might say something that he should not?” Caradoc asked. That was the reason they had come up with subterfuge. Of those who knew what they planned the following day, only the Archmagi William and Miriam were not in the tent then. Caradoc knew he was being cowardly. Not that he felt he should tell Edward, for the man might betray the secret. But that he was not confronting Clarisse and telling her what he was up to. She, as she had done in the past, might find a way to join them. And he was not going to take her north to Powys. He was not sure that Cynwal, the Clanrex, if he captured Clarisse, wouldn’t torture her to death.

The man was the father of Hyfaidd, and there had never been a man so evil as he. Caradoc was glad that he had killed the man. Stupid and arrogant, and responsible for making the borders unsafe. So unsafe that Caradoc had come to realize that the only way to secure them was to destroy the line of Chiefs of Powys. He had killed the son. Caradoc’s father had killed the Clanrex’s father. Now it was time to see that the Clanrex was killed as well.

Caradoc did not care who did it, as long as it was done.

That the Clanrex and his line be eradicated. They wanted war, and had gone a long way to putting Northmarch in jeopardy. That the battles of spring and summer had seen to the destruction of much of the armies of Powys did not finish off the Clanrex and his powerbase. Duchess Amanda had said that man would not go to extremes to have his revenge against Caradoc., but he should be prepared for being hunted by the agents of the Clanrex as long as the Clanrex lived.

That was something Caradoc did not want to have over his head, or that of his children. Thus, with a few companions, and an army, he had broken from the main contingent that marched south.

“Last year it would have been a dozen of us,” Caradoc mused.

“And Clarisse would have been hanging on you as well. I should hope that she never realizes that Miriam made her groggy so she would not argue.” William said. He rode next to Caradoc. He was not troubled by the soreness from riding for so long. William cast spells to make himself comfortable.

“I suspect that if Princess Clarisse does realize that Lady Miriam had cast spells upon her to restrain her, then she will also realize why.” Caradoc said. He had talked to Miriam about that issue. That if she had come, as she had done in the past, then he would not be able to concentrate on the task that he had to do.

Clarisse was smart enough to understand that should she be captured, or hurt, Caradoc did not think well. The last time he had cut his way through an army to rescue her. He had killed or wounded badly enough that his enemies had fled, more than forty men. Then later, in a second part of that attack, had dueled and killed Hyfaidd, and allowed William to collapse part of the castle where Clarisse had been held.

“I can check if you wish. It has been some days, and I am certain that none of the Magus still in the employ of the Clanrex will know that I speak to Miriam. I am worried that she does stay with Edward and travels south.”

Caradoc said, “No, I do not need to know my wife’s state of mind. I do worry that they stay south also, but Clarisse knows she will earn my displeasure should she leave Edward’s column. Now, we have other business at hand. How much longer did you think?”

William had reported that the previous night, they having been in Powys for four days, had attracted warriors of the Clanrex heading towards them. Caradoc and his men had attacked twice, doing the same amount of damage that the armies of Powys had done to the countryside of Hull. Caradoc had struck the hands of men who had raised weapons against his men. Those of Powys had struck the heads form men, women, and children who had remained on their farms in Hill when their armies had crossed over the border.

Caradoc left his enemies with one hand, and did not kill the children of women. He did have his men burn their homes, and fields. He was summoning the Clanrex. The ruling line of Powys had been tried and found wanting, again. Just as the Clanrex’ father had his chance to make peace, and had found reasons to attack and kill those of Northmarch who had been of no attachment to warriors, so had the son, and Hyfaidd was totally evil. Caradoc wanted word to spread. Cynwal’s head, or more terror.

“Better make camp soon. My young men are telling me that the clansmen of Powys are getting close.” William said then, rubbing at his head That generally meant he had heard something in his mind. “Here come some of your scouts to tell you the same.”

It was so. The Magus had really begun to understand and work on communications in their minds. They had been able to do this before, but it had taken a lot of power. Something thad had been done with great difficulty. Since William and Miriam had met and could communicate without any effort across great distances, things had begun to change in communications.

If the Magus were known to each, and the better known, the easier, then they could speak over greater distances than those who were only acquainted with each other. And acquaintance was no determination that the spell would be easy. Mere acquaintance could exhaust a man trying to communicate with another a mile away.

“Lord,” the first of the men to draw near said. “It is as we planned. As we hoped.”

Caradoc knew what that meant. “Then there are warbands approaching.”

It was a statement, not a question.

“Yes, my lord.” The scout said and looked to the ArchMagus. William shrugged his shoulders. Caradoc hated that his friend did that. William needed to have patrols go forth to espy the land and look for the enemy. He could not see if they were out there without men, and specifically the other Magus, roaming ahead, to the sides and behind. That he would then tell Caradoc what the scouts found before they returned made the reports of the scouts redundant. Caradoc did not want his men to feel as if their duty was worthless, so he listened to the reports in full and asked questions. Questions that often William had already told him the answers to.

Sending the scout on his way after Caradoc had quizzed him he turned to the ArchMagus and said, “I will have to stop riding with you. You know it belittles the work of the men.”

William said, “That is not my intention. So, now what do we do? Set-up camp?”

Caradoc nodded. “Yes, I shall give the orders. And then we shall see if the plan will work.”

William shivered. “I do not much like sitting around as a target. I can not think that we did that much when we went to the Holy Lands.”

Caradoc nodded, “No, there we were always moving. And, if a small group of twenty or less of us could have found and killed Cynwal, I would have come north with far fewer men.”

Again William shivered. “I don’t like the thought of this mission either. We have never acted to single out one man for this type of justice.”

“One might think it unchivalrous. It isn’t chivalrous. But we are not mere knight or apprentice no longer. We must act for a larger purpose. The realm, and all those generations must be protected. The clans of Powys are led by men who have proven traitorous, deceitful and vengeful. I have judged them, and found them wanting, as have others. Their punishment is imminent.”

William chuckled even as the situation was very grave, “You should have said that to your wife. She would have argued. Princess Clarisse will always argue, but you would have had a rightness when speaking to her. She would not have been able to thwart you in this quest at all.”

“Hmm,” Was all he had to comment. Let William take the lady Miriam to wife and see what being right would mean to surviving an argument. The only thing that had saved him from his wife’s displeasure and her visible anger, for she kept that private when they parted, was the subterfuge of the message. That had been inspired, and the agents of Powys, that were surely in the Northmarch camp, would have reported on the messenger arriving as well.

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