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Posts Tagged ‘Major-General Sir Amos Godsell Robert Norcott’

Regency Personalities Series

In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Lieutenant General Sir William Sherbrooke Ramsey Norcott
12 December 1804 – 23 January 1886

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William Sherbrooke Ramsey Norcott

Lieutenant General Sir William Sherbrooke Ramsey Norcott was born in Chelmsford Essex, the second son to General Sir Amos Godsell Robert Norcott CB KCH who had commanded a battalion of the 95th Rifles at the Battle of Waterloo.

Norcott was commissioned into the Rifle Brigade in 1822 and made a Captain of the 52nd Regiment in on 21 February 1840. Later the same year (7 August) he returned to the Rifles and on 1 August 1847 became a Major.

During the Crimean War he fought at the Battle of Alma and commanded 1st Battalion, the Rifle Brigade at the Siege of Sevastopol.

Between 1855 and 1868 he was Aide-de-Camp to Queen Victoria, then went on to become Lieutenant Governor of Jersey between 1 October 1873 to 30 September 1878.

He was awarded the Knight of the Order of the Bath in 1877 and became a General in 1879.

After his retirement he wrote some letters to The Times newspaper disputing some of the claims made about the battle of Alma.

William died at 87 on 23 January 1886 in St. Leonard’s-on-Sea, Sussex.

In 1848 he married Frances Marrianne Durant; they had six children, at least 3 sons became soldiers.

  • Charles Hawtrey Bruce Norcott born 25 April 1849 became a General of the Rifle Brigade.
  • Walter Gordon Norcott born about 1851, became a Lieutenant-colonel in the Royal Munster Fusiliers (also served in the Royal Bengal Fusiliers)
  • Gerald Alfred born about 1861 became a Major of the Loyal Regiment (North Lancashire) (having originally joined the 47th Foot and who died of Pneumonia whilst on staff service during World War I.
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Regency Personalities Series

In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Major-General Sir Amos Godsell Robert Norcott
3 August 1777 – 8 January 1838

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Amos Godsell Robert Norcott

Major-General Sir Amos Godsell Robert Norcott was born at Westminster, London, the only child of Lieutenant Amos Norcott of the Green Horse Regiment. He entered the British Army in 1793, joining the 33rd Foot Regiment as a second lieutenant and serving on the staff of his great-uncle, Robert Cuninghame, 1st Baron Rossmore, the Commander-in-Chief of Ireland.

Norcott later served with his regiment in India. During his time there, he became friends with Arthur Wellesley (the future Duke of Wellington), who helped him pay off his gambling debts. In 1802 Norcott transferred into the newly formed 95th Rifles and served with them throughout the Peninsular War. Despite being wounded at the Battle of Corunna, he was promoted to the rank of acting lieutenant colonel and he commanded the six companies of 2nd/95th at the Battle of Waterloo. During the battle, he was badly wounded again; for his actions he was later invested as a Companion of the Order of the Bath.

His lieutenant colonelcy was confirmed on 9 September 1819 with the brevet rank of full colonel of the 8th Foot Regiment. He then became a major general in July 1830.

On 13 September 1831, Norcott was made a Knight Commander of the Royal Hanoverian Guelphic Order in a ceremony at St James’s Palace. In 1834, he served as acting Governor of Jamaica before later becoming commander of the Cork District where he died at Marysboro House on 8 January 1838.

Amos Norcott married Elizabeth Noble, of Yorkshire, on 14 November 1801, and had three sons:

  • Robert Norcott served in the army but died of cholera in India;
  • William Sherbrooke Ramsey Norcott became a lieutenant general of the Rifle Brigade, fought in the Crimean War, and was Aide-de-camp to Queen Victoria;
  • Charles Rossmore Robert Norcott became a superintendent of the Western Australia Police and later was an Aide-de-camp to his father in Cork; he died only six weeks after his father.

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