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Posts Tagged ‘John Hely-Hutchinson 2nd Earl of Donoughmore’

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Sir John Abercromby
2 April 1772 – 14 February 1817

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John Abercromby

Abercromby was second son of Sir Ralph Abercromby. Abercromby entered the army in 1782 as a cornet in the 4th Dragoons, transferring in 1786 as an ensign in the 75th Highland Regiment. He gained promotion to lieutenant in 1787, and to captain in 1792. He subsequently served as an ADC to his father during campaigns in Flanders (1793–1794), the West Indies (1796–1797), Ireland (1798) and against the Batavian Republic (1799). Promoted to colonel in 1800, he left his father’s staff, but became deputy adjutant general and served under General Hutchinson in the force led by his father to Egypt (1801). His father died in battle at Alexandria; but John continued to render admirable service, for which General Hutchinson commended him.
When war broke out anew in 1803 the French detained Abercromby while travelling in France and imprisoned him at Verdun for the next five years. During his captivity he received promotion to major-general in 1805 and the appointment as colonel of the 53rd Regiment of Foot in 1807. Exchanged in 1808 for General Brenier, he became Commander-in-Chief of the Bombay Army in 1809. From there he led the forces that captured Mauritius in 1810, returning to Bombay in 1811. In 1813 he transferred to become Commander-in-Chief of the Madras Army and temporary Governor of Madras, with promotion to lieutenant-general. The Indian climate had broken his health, however, and he had to return to Britain at the end of 1813, where he received the KCB. He became GCB in 1815, and succeeded his elder brother George as MP for Clackmannanshire. However, his worsening health drove him to the Continent, and he died in Marseilles in 1817.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

John Hely-Hutchinson 2nd Earl of Donoughmore
15 May 1757 – 29 June 1832

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John Hely-Hutchinson 2nd Earl of Donoughmore

He was the son of John Hely-Hutchinson and the Baroness Donoughmore. In 1801 he was created Baron Hutchinson in the Peerage of the United Kingdom (gaining a seat in the House of Lords) and later succeeded to all his brother Richard’s titles. Educated at Eton, Magdalen College, Oxford, and Trinity College, Dublin. He died 29th June 1832, never having married.

He entered the Army as a Cornet in the 18th Dragoons in 1774, rising to a Lieutenant the next year. In 1776 he was promoted to become a Captain in the 67th Regiment of Foot, and a Major there in 1781. He moved regiments again in 1783, becoming a Lieutenant-Colonel in the 77th Regiment of Foot.

In March 1794 he obtained brevet promotion to Colonel, then became a Major-General in May 1796, a Lieutenant-General in September 1803, and a full General in June 1813. In 1811, he became Colonel of the 18th Regiment of Foot.

He served in the Flanders campaigns of 1793 as aide-de-camp to Sir Ralph Abercromby, and in Ireland during the Irish Rebellion of 1798, where he was second-in-command at the Battle of Castlebar under General Lake. In 1799, he was in the expedition to the Netherlands, and was second-in-command of the 1801 expedition to Egypt, under Abercromby. Following Abercromby’s death in March after being wounded at the Battle of Alexandria, Hely-Hutchinson took command of the force. In reward for his successes there, the Ottoman Sultan Selim III made him a Knight, 1st Class, of the Order of the Crescent.

Hely-Hutchinson sat as Member of Parliament (MP) for Lanesborough from 1776 to 1783 and for Taghmon from 1789 to 1790. Subsequently he represented Cork City in the Irish House of Commons until the Act of Union in 1801 and was then member for Cork City in the after-Union Parliament of the United Kingdom until 1802.

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