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Posts Tagged ‘Duke of Marlborough George Spencer-Churchill 4th Duke’

Regency Personalities Series

In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency (I include those who were born before 1811 and who died after 1795), today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Somerset Lowry-Corry 2nd Earl Belmore
11 July 1774 – 18 April 1841

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Somerset Lowry-Corry 2nd Earl Belmore

Somerset Lowry-Corry 2nd Earl Belmore was the only surviving son of Armar Lowry-Corry, 1st Earl Belmore, and his first wife Lady Margaret Butler. In 1798, he was elected to the Irish House of Commons for Tyrone and represented the constituency until the Act of Union in 1801. Thereafter he was returned to the British House of Commons for County Tyrone, a seat he held until 1802, when he succeeded his father as earl.

In 1819 Lord Belmore was appointed Custos Rotulorum of Tyrone and elected as a Representative Peer for Ireland. He served as Governor of Jamaica from 1828 to 1832 and was also a colonel in the Tyrone Militia.

He inherited from his father the magnificent house at Castle Coole in County Fermanagh, along with considerable debts. Nonetheless he furnished the house and its classical interiors designed by James Wyatt in an exuberant Regency fashion between 1802 and 1825. Elaborate curtains and pelmets, pier glasses, “Grecian” couches and a magnificent state bed designed to accommodate King George IV on his state visit to Ireland in 1821 (although the king did not make it as far as Castle Coole, much to the disappointment of the earl) were all supplied by the Dublin upholsterer John Preston at a total cost of around £35,000. Lord Belmore also commissioned Sir Richard Morrison to build a new stable block in 1817.

Lord Belmore bought the captured James Madison and had her converted from schooner to brig rig. He also renamed her Osprey, of Killybegs in Donegal, armed her with fourteen 9-pounder carronades, and arranged for her to have a letter of marque.

Around 1817, Lord Belmore used Osprey for a family cruise to the Eastern Mediterranean. Her captain was Lord Belmore’s brother, Captain Armar Lowry-Corry, RN. The party included Belmore’s wife, the Countess Juliana, their two sons, their lapdog Rosa, the family doctor, Dr. Robert Richardson, M.D. (Edinburgh), and the vicar, Mr. Holt. They visited Malta, Sicily, Italy, the Ionian Islands, Greece, Rome, and Alexandria. They also sailed up the Nile as far as Luxor in three local boats.

Lord Belmore apparently had two hobbies in Egypt. One was collecting antiquities. To that end he sponsored some of Giovanni Battista Belzoni’s excavations in Egypt with the result that tomb KV30, in the Valley of the Kings, is known as Lord Belmore’s tomb. These excavations were the source of some of Lord Belmore’s collection of Egyptian antiquities, such as the sarcophagus that is now in the British Museum.

Lord Belmore’s other hobby was carving his name on Egyptian antiquities. In his desire to commemorate his travels, Belmore carved his name into a stone at the top of the Great Pyramid of Giza, the Ramesseum (the mortuary temple of Ramses II), and on the side of the Temple of Dendur, which is now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Corry also carved his name on a pillar of the temple of Medinet Habu at Luxor. After Egypt, the family traveled to Palestine and visited Jerusalem.

In 1819 when the family was done with their cruise, Belmore sold Osprey to the King of Naples and the family returned home.

On 20 October 1800 Somerset married his cousin Lady Juliana Butler (20 September 1783 –22 July 1861), second daughter of Henry Butler, 2nd Earl of Carrick by his wife Sarah Taylor, second daughter and co-heiress of Edward Taylor, of Askeaton, County Limerick, and had issue:

Lord Belmore died at Leamington Spa, Warwickshire on 18 April 1841 aged sixty-six and was succeeded by his eldest son.

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Regency Personalities Series

In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Henry Welbore Agar-Ellis 2nd Viscount Clifden
22 January 1761 – 13 July 1836

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Henry Ellis

Henry Ellis 2nd Viscount Clifden was born Henry Welbore Agar, he was the eldest son of James Agar, 1st Viscount Clifden of Gowran Castle, Gowran, Co. Kilkenny Ireland, son of Henry Agar and Anne, daughter of Welbore Ellis, Bishop of Meath, and sister of Welbore Ellis, 1st Baron Mendip. His mother was Lucia, daughter of Colonel John Martin, of Dublin. He was the nephew of Charles Agar, 1st Earl of Normanton.

Agar was returned to the Irish House of Commons for both Gowran and County Kilkenny in 1783, but chose to sit for the latter, a seat he held until 1789, when he succeeded his father in the Irish viscountcy and entered the Irish House of Lords. He had been appointed Clerk of the Irish Privy Council in 1785, which he remained until 1817. In 1793 he was elected to the British House of Commons as one of two representatives for Heytesbury. He succeeded his great-uncle Lord Mendip as second Baron Mendip in 1802 according to a special remainder in the letters patent. This was an English peerage and forced him to resign from the House of Commons and enter the House of Lords. Two years later he assumed by Royal licence the surname of Ellis in lieu of Agar.

Lord Clifden married Lady Caroline, daughter of George Spencer, 4th Duke of Marlborough, in 1792. His only son George became a successful politician and was created Baron Dover in his father’s lifetime, but predeceased his father. Lady Clifden died at Blenheim Palace in November 1813, aged 50. Lord Clifden remained a widower until his death at Hanover Square, Mayfair, London, in July 1836, aged 75. He was succeeded in his titles by his grandson Henry, the eldest son of Lord Dover.

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Regency Personalities Series

In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Francis Almeric Spencer 1st Baron Churchill
26 December 1779 – 10 March 1845

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Francis Almeric Spencer

Francis Almeric Spencer 1st Baron Churchill was a British peer and Whig politician from the Spencer family.

Born Lord Francis Almeric Spencer, he was the second youngest of the 4th Duke of Marlborough. From 1801–15, he was Member of Parliament (MP) for Oxfordshire and on his retirement from the Commons, was raised to the peerage as Baron Churchill, of Whichwood in the County of Oxford.

Lord Churchill married Lady Frances FitzRoy, daughter of Augustus FitzRoy, 3rd Duke of Grafton, on 25 November 1800. He died in 1845 and was succeeded by his eldest son, Francis George. His third son was General The Hon. Sir Augustus Almeric Spencer, G.C.B..

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Cropley Ashley-Cooper 6th Earl of Shaftesbury
21 December 1768 – 2 June 1851

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Cropley Ashley-Cooper

Cropley Ashley-Cooper 6th Earl of Shaftesbury was a younger son of Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 4th Earl of Shaftesbury, by his second wife the Hon. Mary, daughter of Jacob Bouverie, 1st Viscount Folkestone.

Shaftesbury was elected Member of Parliament for Dorchester in 1790, a seat he held until 1811. The latter year he succeeded his elder brother in the earldom and entered the House of Lords, in which he served as Chairman of Committees.

Lord Shaftesbury married Lady Anne, daughter of George Spencer, 4th Duke of Marlborough, in 1796. Their daughter Lady Harriet Anne married Henry Lowry-Corry and was the mother of Montagu Corry, 1st Baron Rowton. Lord Shaftesbury died in June 1851, aged 82, and was succeeded in the earldom by his son, Anthony, the noted social reformer. Another son of his is Anthony Henry Ashley-Cooper, MP for Dorchester. Lady Shaftesbury died in August 1865, aged 91.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Lady Elizabeth Herbert, Countess of Pembroke and Montgomery
March 1737 – 30 April 1831

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Lady Elizabeth Spencer

Lady Elizabeth Herbert was born Elizabeth Spencer to Charles Spencer, 3rd Duke of Marlborough and Elizabeth Trevor.

Her siblings were George, Charles, and Diana.

At nineteen she married Henry Herbert, 10th Earl of Pembroke.

She was admired by George III in the early 1760s, becoming a Lady of the Bedchamber to his wife, Queen Charlotte. The King and Queen stayed for two nights with Henry and Elizabeth at Wilton House in 1778.

“Husbands are dreadfull and powerful Animals” wrote the long-suffering Elizabeth after taking her husband back in 1762, though she did manage to prevent his illegitimate son from that affair from keeping the surname Herbert. She and Henry ended up living in separate quarters at Wilton (he downstairs, she upstairs), with her eventually leaving for Pembroke Lodge in Richmond Park in 1788, which the king had put at her disposal. However, the King – who had been attracted to Elizabeth all his life – suffered his first bout of insanity that same year, and she had to endure the embarrassment of his sporadic and unwanted attentions until his recovery later that year.

Children:
George Augustus Herbert, 11th Earl of Pembroke, 8th Earl of Montgomery 10 September 1759-26 October 1827
Charlotte Herbert 14 July 1773-21 April 1784

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Lord Charles Spencer
31 March 1740 – 16 June 1820

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Charles Spencer

Lord Charles Spencer was the second son of Charles Spencer, 3rd Duke of Marlborough, and the Hon. Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Trevor, 2nd Baron Trevor. George Spencer, 4th Duke of Marlborough, was his elder brother.

Spencer sat as Member of Parliament for Oxfordshire from 1761 to 1790 and 1796 to 1801 and was sworn of the Privy Council in 1763. He served as Comptroller of the Household from 1763 to 1765, as a Junior Lord of the Admiralty from 1768 to 1779 and as Treasurer of the Chamber from 1779 to 1782, when that sinecure post was abolished. He was later Postmaster General from 1801 to 1806 and Master of the Mint in 1806. From 1808 until his death he was a Lord of the Bedchamber to George III.

Spencer married Mary Beauclerk (4 December 1743 – 13 January 1812), daughter of Vere Beauclerk, 1st Baron Vere and sister of Aubrey Beauclerk, 5th Duke of St Albans, on 2 October 1762. They had three sons.

  • Robert Spencer (circa 1764 – 1831)
  • John Spencer (21 December 1767 – 17 December 1831)
  • William Robert Spencer (9 January 1769 – 23 October 1834)

Lady Charles Spencer died in January 1812 aged 68. Spencer survived her by eight years and died in June 1820, aged 80.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

George Spencer-Churchill 5th Duke of Marlborough
6 March 1766 – 5 March 1840

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George Spencer-Churchill

George Spencer-Churchill 5th Duke of Marlborough was the eldest son of George Spencer, 4th Duke of Marlborough, and Lady Caroline Russell, daughter of John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford. Francis Spencer, 1st Baron Churchill, was his younger brother. He was educated at Eton between 1776 and 1783 and at Christ Church, Oxford between 1784 and 1786, where he graduated on 9 December 1786 as a Bachelor of Arts, later proceeding automatically to Master of Arts. He was later given the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws (D.C.L.) from the University on 20 June 1792.

Lord Blandford represented Oxfordshire in parliament as a Whig between 1790 and 1796 and Tregony as a Tory between 1802 and 1806. From 1804 to 1806 he served under William Pitt the Younger as a Lord of the Treasury. The latter year he was summoned to the House of Lords through a writ of acceleration in his father’s barony of Spencer of Wormleighton. During this time, he lived in Berkshire, at Remenham and Hurst. From 1798, he resided at Whiteknights Park at Earley, near Reading, where he became famous for his extravagant collecting of antiquities, especially books. He was invested as a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries (FSA) on 8 December 1803.

Although the Marquess was born and baptised with the name of George Spencer, soon after succeeding to the Dukedom of Marlborough, he had it legally changed on 26 May 1817 to George Spencer-Churchill. This illustrious name did not, however, save him from his mounting debts and his estates were seized and his collections sold. He retired to Blenheim Palace where he lived the remainder of his life off a small annuity granted to the first Duke by Queen Anne.

The diarist Harriet Arbuthnot wrote one of her most scathing comments about the Duke following a visit to Blenheim in 1824:

The family of the great General is, however, gone sadly to decay, and are but a disgrace to the illustrious name of Churchill, which they have chosen this moment to resume. The present Duke is overloaded with debt, is very little better than a common swindler and lets everything about Blenheim. People may shoot and fish at so much per hour and it has required all the authority of a Court of Chancery to prevent his cutting down all the trees in the park.

Marlborough married Lady Susan Stewart, daughter of John Stewart, 7th Earl of Galloway, on 15 September 1791. They had four children:

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Lady Susan Stewart, Duchess of Marlborough

  • George Spencer-Churchill, 6th Duke of Marlborough (1793–1857)
  • Lord Charles Spencer-Churchill (1794–1840), married Ethelred Catherine Benett and had issue.
  • Reverend Lord George Henry Spencer-Churchill (1796–1828), married Elizabeth Martha Nares.
  • Lord Henry John Spencer-Churchill (1797–1840).

Illegitimate children:

  • John Tustian (1799–1873).

Illegitimate children by Matilda Glover (1802–1876)

  • Georgina Matilda (1819–1898)
  • Caroline Augusta (1821–1905)
  • Elizabeth (Ellen) (1823–1878)
  • Henry Spencer (1831–1831)
  • George
  • Henry

The Duke died in March 1840, aged 73, at Blenheim Palace and was buried there in the vault beneath the chapel on 13 March 1840. His eldest son George, Marquess of Blandford, succeeded in the title. The Duchess of Marlborough died at Park Lane, Mayfair, London, in April 1841, aged 73.

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