Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Colonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence’

Colonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence For your enjoyment, one of the Regency Romances I published.

It is available for sale and I hope that you will take the opportunity to order your copy.

For yourself or as a gift. It is now available in a variety of formats.

For just a few dollars this Regency Romance can be yours for your eReaders or physically in Trade Paperback.

PastedGraphic2-2013-06-28-06-10-2013-07-18-05-10.jpg

Barnes and Noble for your Nook or in Paperback

Smashwords

iBookstore

Amazon for your Kindle or in Trade Paperback

Witnessing his cousin marry for love and not money, as he felt destined to do, Colonel Fitzwilliam refused to himself to be jealous. He did not expect his acquaintance with the Bennet Clan to change that.    

Catherine Bennet, often called Kitty, had not given a great deal of thought to how her life might change with her sisters Elizabeth and Jane becoming wed to rich and connected men. Certainly meeting Darcy’s handsome cousin, a Colonel, did not affect her.   

 But one had to admit that the connections of the Bingleys and Darcys were quite advantageous. All sorts of men desired introductions now that she had such wealthy new brothers.    

Kitty knew that Lydia may have thought herself fortunate when she had married Wickham, the first Bennet daughter to wed. Kitty, though, knew that true fortune had come to her. She just wasn’t sure how best to apply herself.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

Read Full Post »

Colonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence
For your holiday enjoyment, one of the Regency Romances I published. It is available for sale and I hope that you will take the opportunity to order your copy for the holiday season. For yourself or as a gift.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For just a few dollars this Regency Romance can be yours for your eReaders or physically in Trade Paperback.

PastedGraphic2-2013-04-12-06-55.jpg

Barnes and Noble for your Nook or in Paperback

Smashwords

iBookstore

Amazon for your Kindle or in Trade Paperback
Witnessing his cousin marry for love and not money, as he felt destined to do, Colonel Fitzwilliam refused to himself to be jealous. He did not expect his acquaintance with the Bennet Clan to change that.

   Catherine Bennet, often called Kitty, had not given a great deal of thought to how her life might change with her sisters Elizabeth and Jane becoming wed to rich and connected men. Certainly meeting Darcy’s handsome cousin, a Colonel, did not affect her.

   But one had to admit that the connections of the Bingleys and Darcys were quite advantageous. All sorts of men desired introductions now that she had such wealthy new brothers.

   Kitty knew that Lydia may have thought herself fortunate when she had married Wickham, the first Bennet daughter to wed. Kitty, though, knew that true fortune had come to her. She just wasn’t sure how best to apply herself.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

Read Full Post »

Colonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence
For your holiday enjoyment, one of the Regency Romances I published. It is available for sale and I hope that you will take the opportunity to order your copy for the holiday season. For yourself or as a gift.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For just a few dollars this Regency Romance can be yours for your eReaders or physically in Trade Paperback.

PastedGraphic2-2013-03-26-07-26.jpg

Barnes and Noble for your Nook or in Paperback

Smashwords

iBookstore

Amazon for your Kindle or in Trade Paperback
Witnessing his cousin marry for love and not money, as he felt destined to do, Colonel Fitzwilliam refused to himself to be jealous. He did not expect his acquaintance with the Bennet Clan to change that.

   Catherine Bennet, often called Kitty, had not given a great deal of thought to how her life might change with her sisters Elizabeth and Jane becoming wed to rich and connected men. Certainly meeting Darcy’s handsome cousin, a Colonel, did not affect her.

   But one had to admit that the connections of the Bingleys and Darcys were quite advantageous. All sorts of men desired introductions now that she had such wealthy new brothers.

   Kitty knew that Lydia may have thought herself fortunate when she had married Wickham, the first Bennet daughter to wed. Kitty, though, knew that true fortune had come to her. She just wasn’t sure how best to apply herself.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

Read Full Post »

Colonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence
For your holiday enjoyment, one of the Regency Romances I published. It is available for sale and I hope that you will take the opportunity to order your copy for the holiday season. For yourself or as a gift.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For just a few dollars this Regency Romance can be yours for your eReaders or physically in Trade Paperback.

PastedGraphic2-2013-03-7-09-05.jpg

Barnes and Noble for your Nook or in Paperback

Smashwords

iBookstore

Amazon for your Kindle or in Trade Paperback
Witnessing his cousin marry for love and not money, as he felt destined to do, Colonel Fitzwilliam refused to himself to be jealous. He did not expect his acquaintance with the Bennet Clan to change that.

   Catherine Bennet, often called Kitty, had not given a great deal of thought to how her life might change with her sisters Elizabeth and Jane becoming wed to rich and connected men. Certainly meeting Darcy’s handsome cousin, a Colonel, did not affect her.

   But one had to admit that the connections of the Bingleys and Darcys were quite advantageous. All sorts of men desired introductions now that she had such wealthy new brothers.

   Kitty knew that Lydia may have thought herself fortunate when she had married Wickham, the first Bennet daughter to wed. Kitty, though, knew that true fortune had come to her. She just wasn’t sure how best to apply herself.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

Read Full Post »

It has been some months since I have done an update on the work in progress writing I am doing. Well a few minutes ago I finished the first draft of a project I call Steamy Suasion, though I hope for a better title then that during the second draft or prior to publication. If you can think of one, let me know.

As with other works, we have published Jane Austen themed work before. The first was our Colonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence. This is the tale of what happens after Pride and Prejudice.

PastedGraphic2-2013-02-15-15-02.jpg

This was followed by another Austen themed book. Jane Austen and Ghosts. This is a tale that has nothing to do much with Jane’s work so much as the recent books that have twisted and tortured Jane’s works.

PastedGraphic-2012-11-30-06-22-2013-02-15-15-02.jpg

But recently the idea came to me that Persuasion lent itself to a little steampunkery. Making the ships that all the naval heroes commanded, Dirigibles, instead of sea going vessels. And then moving the squadron and Admiral Croft to take over Kellynch-hall. The nucleus of the tale came to me. But to aid me, I delved into Shapard’s Annotated Persuasion. It is well worth getting if you are serious about Jane scholarship.

PastedGraphic-2013-02-15-15-02.jpg

Here then are the first few pages of the first draft.

Chapter 1

There are many truths in a man or woman’s life. They change as do the seasons, or the courses of the tide. One truth you hold when the tide is in, may be reversed as the water itself, when the tide has gone out. When circumstances change. Such is the case that happened to Sir Walter Elliot, when he found himself a widower. The truth that he had known, had adhered to when married and his wife, Lady Elliot, had been there to provide an anchor on habits that in other men, he had found abhorrent, was now reversed. Without a wife, he was without his rudder. He floundered and found solace only in the comforts he had when he was young and all acknowledged him beautiful.

A remembrance that age finds fault with all who spend enough time to argue with it. Those either blessed or unfortunate that do not remain to argue the point can only but look in a mirror and see that she makes no judgement but send the affliction of time upon all.

That Sir Walter, without the close guidance that his wife provided found no true course to hold to would have been evident from those who knew him from before that state of wedded bliss he had known for twenty years. Perhaps even one who was willing to bestow an allowance would say that the loss of Lady Elliot gave the man cause to return to a state of mind that was less than it had been when he had been partnered by a spouse that could challenge him to the best of his qualities.

But with Lady Elliot’s passing, Sir Walter was able to indulge upon himself all manner of pleasures and folderol that appeased his vanity. And allowed that quality, as he perceived it, to grow and eclipse his other intentions. While he had grounds that were extensive at Kellynch-hall, he seldom chose to walk about them as the sun might cause his complexion to darken. His library was perhaps the greatest in all Somerset, yet the only book that excited his fancy and that he could be counted upon to peruse, aside from the bible, was the Baronetage. And here he would but look at the page that bore his family name, and the entries therein.

Such perusal might take him a mere minute, as he had memorized each line, each comma that had to do with his branch of the Elliot tree. Though often he would look at other entries, for there were many of families much younger than his, and here one might notice the curve of his lips as he might smile when reflecting on the longevity of his line. Or, seldom, he might look upon those few families mentioned that were listed in the rolls of the Baronetage that had history a few years more than his own family. But, he took pride that there were but a handful of those, and seeing the current descendants of those named, he could tell at a glance that their blood must have been tainted in some way as none could put forth a leg or a visage that would in any way be classed in the same circle from which he could exhibit.

But to Sir Walter’s mind, there was little wrong with this. He was from a great and illustrious family that had been in England long before the conqueror thought to row over from Normandy. As supporters of the Restoration of the second Charles, the Elliot’s had been rewarded with their title and so it was recorded in Dugdale’s tome, The Antient Usage of Bearing of such Ensigns of Honour as are commonly call’d Arms.

Yet Sir Walter had responsibilities left to him when his wife died. Three girls of various ages were left for him to sort out. A task that was made hard to bear for they each, in their way to his mind’s eye, took after Lady Elliot. Further, he had not undertaken the study of rearing of children and would promptly admit, should anyone ever venture to broach the topic, that he was the least qualified man in the world to handle such a task.

Miss Elliot, the eldest child Elizabeth was at an early age made mistress of the great estate of Kellynch-hall. Next was Miss Anne Elliot and last Miss Mary Elliot. The latter perhaps too young to understand all that encompassed in the death of one’s mother. The eldest so involved in deciding and managing a great estate at such an early age left her with little time for feeling any emotion whatsoever upon the death of her mother. This left only the middle child, Anne, to have the time, understanding, and inclination to realize what truly had taken place with the death of her mother.

Anne knew that such feelings must be contained, for many children her age lost their parents to death and they found some manner in which to proceed. Anne did as well, but it did not mean she did not note her loss, or did her best to find a way to resolve the emotions that came of it.

She was aided, though never with word, by Lady Elliot’s close friend, Lady Russell. Lady Russell lived in Kellynch, the widow of a knight. Her bond with Lady Elliot had ensured that Lady Russell would do her best, not as a substitute mother, but as an interested party, to see to what little she could in aid of her friend’s children.

While Elizabeth, with her own firm notions of what was required of her as mistress of Kellynch-hall unless circumstances changed and her father, Sir Walter remarried, did not brook any helpful guidance, the younger two girls were quite pleased to seek what passed for care from Lady Russell. Elizabeth, perhaps, took some very slight offense that another woman would choose to have say at Kellynch-hall, but Sir Walter never saw this as an affront to his own sensibilities. He did seem to recognize that there were issues and events where a woman’s touch was needed to help guide him, and cognizant of the great friendship that had persisted between his wife and Lady Russell thought it natural, as he had no other close female relation of such an age, to seek her counsel.

Thus Lady Russell who had been often an fixture about the drawing room at Kellynch-hall prior to Lady Elliot’s sickness, was after her death, seen at the manor house near each day. And held in such high regard by Sir Walter, that Miss Elliot, Elizabeth the eldest of the daughters of Sir Walter, found that though she needn’t listen to all that Lady Russell advised, following much of what Lady Russell advised was a way to keep peace and all calm in the waters that lay about the estate.

A study of her father by Anne, and also that of Lady Russell along the paths of why neither sought solace in another spouse, came to the conclusion that Lady Russell had been provided with enough of a fortune by her late husband that she might live out her life quite comfortably. Her husband had been bright enough to invent the outlet installed upon the wall that converted the new electricity that was carried through the cables to homes, become knighted, marry, and then sell his invention for a quite tidy sum. Able to live the life of a gentleman.

In the case of Sir Walter, Anne concluded that though he might wish for some form of companionship besides she and her sisters, Sir Walter had an aesthetic of beauty that he was searching for. One that was balanced that could never be as beautiful as he perceived himself, yet had to be more beautiful than he found in all others. This was further hampered by some credence that the woman would have to be a great heiress, for he knew that Kellynch-hall needed some little additional income, as he understood it, to maintain it’s glory. A fortune had been spent to keep the manor on a footing that all the new inventions that came were installed in the house.

Then last, Anne understood what her sisters and Lady Russell might also understand but certainly would never say aloud. Sir Walter had lived through three young people underfoot as they grew in the nursery, and then the schoolroom. He had Lady Elliot at that time to smooth his feathers and do her best to steer him to calm waters when he was upset by the antics that Anne and her sisters displayed in their youth. Faced though with such events once more with a new wife desiring her own children, Sir Walter would never consent to it. Rather would he remain unmarried, and live with all that came of not having a son to be his heir, and not having a companion in his twilight years, then to live with a new wife and new babes. Further, for companionship, he may not have wished to renew his marital state, but he did have Lady Russell to act as a companion for all else, for she was at Kellynch-hall at least five days of each week and more often than not, all seven.

Anne reflected that Lady Russell was not a companion of her father in the sense that she was looked to be the lady of Kellynch-hall. That would have taken from Elizabeth. And Elizabeth, who had been on the cusp of coming out when their mother died, and forfeited her first season in London instead remaining in the country wearing mourning. Whilst doing so, as Sir Walter’s eldest, she asserted herself and took the place in household matters that their mothers death had laid vacant.

The two younger girls were consoled by Lady Russell, as Lady Elliot had designed when news of the fatality of her illness was brought to light. Anne had some bond with Lady Russell before this event, but it was made stronger after. Lady Russell had more education than most in the near country and she shared this with Anne.

Read Full Post »

Colonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence
For your holiday enjoyment, one of the Regency Romances I published. It is available for sale and I hope that you will take the opportunity to order your copy for the holiday season. For yourself or as a gift.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For just a few dollars this Regency Romance can be yours for your eReaders or physically in Trade Paperback.

PastedGraphic2-2013-02-15-07-04.jpg

Barnes and Noble for your Nook or in Paperback

Smashwords

iBookstore

Amazon for your Kindle or in Trade Paperback
Witnessing his cousin marry for love and not money, as he felt destined to do, Colonel Fitzwilliam refused to himself to be jealous. He did not expect his acquaintance with the Bennet Clan to change that.

   Catherine Bennet, often called Kitty, had not given a great deal of thought to how her life might change with her sisters Elizabeth and Jane becoming wed to rich and connected men. Certainly meeting Darcy’s handsome cousin, a Colonel, did not affect her.

   But one had to admit that the connections of the Bingleys and Darcys were quite advantageous. All sorts of men desired introductions now that she had such wealthy new brothers.

   Kitty knew that Lydia may have thought herself fortunate when she had married Wickham, the first Bennet daughter to wed. Kitty, though, knew that true fortune had come to her. She just wasn’t sure how best to apply herself.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

Read Full Post »

Colonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence
For your holiday enjoyment, one of the Regency Romances I published. It is available for sale and I hope that you will take the opportunity to order your copy for the holiday season. For yourself or as a gift.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For just a few dollars this Regency Romance can be yours for your eReaders or physically in Trade Paperback.

PastedGraphic2-2013-01-31-08-38.jpg

Barnes and Noble for your Nook or in Paperback

Smashwords

iBookstore

Amazon for your Kindle or in Trade Paperback
Witnessing his cousin marry for love and not money, as he felt destined to do, Colonel Fitzwilliam refused to himself to be jealous. He did not expect his acquaintance with the Bennet Clan to change that.

   Catherine Bennet, often called Kitty, had not given a great deal of thought to how her life might change with her sisters Elizabeth and Jane becoming wed to rich and connected men. Certainly meeting Darcy’s handsome cousin, a Colonel, did not affect her.

   But one had to admit that the connections of the Bingleys and Darcys were quite advantageous. All sorts of men desired introductions now that she had such wealthy new brothers.

   Kitty knew that Lydia may have thought herself fortunate when she had married Wickham, the first Bennet daughter to wed. Kitty, though, knew that true fortune had come to her. She just wasn’t sure how best to apply herself.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »