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Posts Tagged ‘Charles Gordon Lennox 5th Duke of Richmond’

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Sir William Miles 1st Baronet
13 May 1797 – 17 June 1878

Sir William Miles 1st Baronet was the son of Philip John Miles (1773–1845) by his first marriage to Maria Whetham (1776–1811). His father was a landowner, shipowner, banker and sugar baron and reportedly the first millionaire in Bristol.

He was educated at Eton College and Christ Church, Oxford and was created a baronet on 19 April 1859, of Leigh Court, Somerset.

He was Tory Member of Parliament (MP) for Chippenham from 1818 to 1820, for New Romney from 1830 to 1832, and sat for East Somerset from 1834 to 1865 as a Conservative. He voluntarily retired his seat in 1865 and it was subsequently held from 1878 by Sir William’s son, Sir Philip Miles.

Sir William was a staunch Conservative, opposed to the Reform Act and was a protectionist who favoured the Corn Law and supported the Duke of Richmond’s Central Agricultural Protection Society (known as the “Anti-League”).

He supported amendments to the Poor Law to ensure that the responsibility for a bastard was not left solely upon the mother, as originally proposed, but would “place some portion of the responsibility on the head of the father”.

Miles supported Enclosure, maintaining that “Allotments of land under enclosures were much more beneficial to the poor than a common right of pasture. Not one inhabitent in ten of a parish made use of a common for purposes of pasturage; but when Allotments were made, every inhabitent participated in the benefit.”

He was deeply religious, at one stage putting forward an amendment in Parliament to prevent trains running on the then newly proposed Great Western Railway on Sundays.

Sir William was chairman of Somerset Quarter Sessions for 35 years, partner in the family’s bank, Miles & Co (which later became part of NatWest) from 1845 to his death in 1878 and commanded the North Somerset Yeomanry Cavalry as its Colonel.

When the parish church at Abbots Leigh burned down in 1847, he paid for its rebuilding from his own pocket.

This afternoon while the bells were chiming for divine service, a fire broke out in the rafters of the roof on the north side of the Church, it was ascertained the next day that the fire was caused by a crack in the chimney of the Store which was most negligently & stupidly built of only one brick thick and placed in immediate contact with the wall plate upon which the feet of the rafters rested. The fire, not withstanding the most active exertions of all the male inhabitants headed by William Miles Esq., whose exertions were almost incredible; the aid of the powerful engine from Leigh Court and after an interval of an hour and a half the assistance of three engines from Bristol, consumed the whole of the roof of the nave and south Aisle, the gallery, pulpit, reading desk and nearly all the pews leaving the tower and chancel uninjured.

Sir William was Vice-President of the Society for Improving the Condition of the Labouring Classes which sought to improve housing for working families. It eventually became part of the Peabody Trust.

A prominent agriculturalist and one of the founding fathers of the Royal Agricultural Society, he was chairman of the local committee who “contributed to the excellence of the arrangements” for the Bristol Country Meeting. He took a practical interest in experiments on his farms.

He regularly hosted the Society and served on its Management Committee as well as being Chairman of the Local Committee at Bristol in 1842 when he judged the trials at Pusey. He lent his own steam engines at Leigh Court for experiments following an anti-modernisation protest in 1847.

He was the Royal Agricultural Society’s Steward of Implements from 1841–1847 and during his Stewardship, the Exhibition of Implements grew from “a couple of sheds to an extend which even then gave promise of the vast proportions which the Shows have attained in recent years”.

He was then a member of the Council and, from 1852 until his death in 1878, one of the 12 Vice-Presidents. Upon his death, his place as Vice-President was taken by Lord Skelmersdale and the President was HRH The Prince of Wales, a shooting companion of Sir William’s son.

Sir William served also as President in 1854-5 when he headed the Society’s deputation to the Universal Exhibition in Paris when he was “received, both by the Emperor, the Ministers, and the learned Societies of that Capital with marked courtesy.”

In his obituary, it was said that
“…ample testimony should be borne to the unwearied energy which Sir William Miles displayed in everything he undertook. No day was too long for him and no obstacle too great to be surmounted… He was endowed with great promptitude of decision and although he required his decisions to be carried out to the very letter, and enforced them where necessary, there always predominated a frankness and manliness of character which won the confidence of all with whom he came in contact and endeared him to those who had the advantage of being associated with him as colleagues.”

“A keen sportsman, he was a hard rider with Sir Richard Sutton, Bt, at Lincoln in his youth (see Burton Hunt), an earnest politician, an able magistrate , and enlightened agriculturalist and a warm-hearted friend.”

Sir William was succeeded in the baronetcy by his eldest son, Philip (1825–1888), who was later an MP for East Somerset. He was uncle of Philip Napier Miles.

Miles married Catherine (1798–1869), daughter of John Gordon, on 12 September 1823, with whom he had the following children:-

  • Sir Philip John William Miles, 2nd Baronet
  • Maria Catherine Miles (1826–1909) who married Robert Charles Tudway, MP for Wells (UK Parliament constituency) and had issue.
  • Agatha Miles (1827–1912) who married General Edward Arthur Somerset, CB; they had eight daughters and one son.
  • Catherine Miles (1834–1911) who married General Sir Robert Onesiphorus Bright, GCB and had three sons and five daughters.
  • Captain William Henry Miles, JP (1830–1888) who married Mary Frances Kynaston Charlton, daughter of Rev John Kynaston Charleton, they had a son, Eustace Miles and two daughters.
  • Emma Clara Miles (1830–1911) who married Reverend Hon James Walter Lascelles, son of Henry Lascelles, 3rd Earl of Harewood and had nine children.
  • Captain Charles John William Miles (1832–1874) who served in the 5th Regiment of Foot and married Elizabeth Maria Lloyd, daughter of Rev Henry Lloyd, but had no children.
  • Frances Harriett Miles (1835–1923) who married Sir William Augustus Ferguson Davie, 3rd Baronet, Senior Clerk to the House of Commons and grandson of General Sir Henry Ferguson Davie, 1st Baronet, they had five children.
  • Florence Louisa Miles (1840–1862) who married The Reverend Francis Edmund Cecil Byng, 5th Earl of Strafford, Chaplain to Queen Victoria and had two children. She died after giving birth to their second child Edmund Byng, 6th Earl of Strafford.
  • Arthur John William Whetham Miles (1841–1853).
  • Harriott Ellin Miles (1841–1864) who married Robert Gurdon, 1st Baron Cranworth, MP for South Norfolk (UK Parliament constituency) and Mid Norfolk, JP, she died after giving birth to their only child, a daughter.
  • Sir Henry Robert William Miles, 4th Baronet (1843–1915) who succeeded his nephew Sir Cecil Miles to the Baronetcy.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Charlotte Lennox Duchess of Richmond
20 September 1768 – 5 May 1842

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Charlotte Lennox

Charlotte Lennox Duchess of Richmond was born at Gordon Castle, Lady Charlotte Gordon was the eldest child of Alexander Gordon, 4th Duke of Gordon, and his wife Jane (née Maxwell). On 9 September 1789, she married Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond, 4th Duke of Lennox and 4th Duke of Aubigny.

In 1814, the family moved to Brussels, where the Duchess gave the ball at which the Duke of Wellington received confirmation that the Army of the North under the command of Napoleon Bonaparte had entered the territory of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands near Charleroi (in what is today Belgium). The Duchess and her family continued to live in Brussels until 1818, when her husband was appointed Governor General of British North America. The Duchess was widowed in 1819, and in 1836, she inherited the vast Gordon estates on the death of her brother, George Gordon, 5th Duke of Gordon, who had left no legitimate children. She died at the age of 73 in London on 5 May 1842.

The Duke and Duchess had seven sons and seven daughters:

  • Charles Gordon-Lennox, 5th Duke of Richmond (1791–1860).
  • Lady Mary Lennox (c. 1792 – 7 December 1847), married Sir Charles Fitzroy and had issue.
  • Lieutenant-Colonel Lord John George Lennox (3 October 1793 – 10 November 1873), married Louisa Rodney and had issue.
  • Lady Sarah Lennox (c. 1794 – 8 September 1873), married Peregrine Maitland.
  • Lady Georgiana Lennox (30 September 1795 – 15 December 1891), married William FitzGerald-de Ros, 23rd Baron de Ros, and had issue.
  • Lord Henry Adam Lennox (6 September 1797 – 1812), fell overboard from HMS Blake and drowned.
  • Lord William Pitt Lennox (20 September 1799 – 18 February 1881), married first Mary Ann Paton and second Ellen Smith; had issue by the latter.
  • Lady Jane Lennox (c. 1800 – 27 March 1861), married Laurence Peel and had issue.
  • Captain Lord Frederick Lennox (24 January 1801 – 25 October 1829).
  • Lord Sussex Lennox (11 June 1802 – 12 April 1874), married Hon. Mary Lawless and had issue.
  • Lady Louisa Maddelena Lennox (2 October 1803 – 2 March 1900), married Rt. Hon. William Tighe, died without issue.
  • Lady Charlotte Lennox (c. 1804 – 20 August 1833), married Maurice Berkeley, 1st Baron FitzHardinge of Bristol, and had issue.
  • Lieutenant-Colonel Lord Arthur Lennox (2 October 1806 – 15 January 1864), married Adelaide Campbell and had issue.
  • Lady Sophia Georgiana Lennox (21 July 1809 – 17 January 1902), married Lord Thomas Cecil, died without issue.

And Coming on April 1st, 2015

Beaux Ballrooms and Battles anthology, celebrating the 200th anniversary of the victory at Waterloo in story.

BBBcorrect-2015-03-28-06-00.jpg

Looks good, huh? The talented writer and digital artist, Aileen Fish created this.

It will be available digitally for $.99 and then after a short period of time sell for the regular price of $4.99

The Trade Paperback version will sell for $12.99

Wellington1Grey-2015-03-28-06-00.jpg

My story in the anthology is entitled: Not a Close Run Thing at All, which of course is a play on the famous misquote attributed to Arthur Wellesley, “a damn close-run thing” which really was “It has been a damned nice thing — the nearest run thing you ever saw in your life.”

Samantha, Lady Worcester had thought love was over for her, much like the war should have been. The Bastille had fallen shortly after she had been born. Her entire life the French and their Revolution had affected her and all whom she knew. Even to having determined who she married, though her husband now had been dead and buried these eight years.

Yet now Robert Barnes, a major-general in command of one of Wellington’s brigades, had appeared before her, years since he had been forgotten and dismissed. The man she had once loved, but because he had only been a captain with no fortune, her father had shown him the door.

With a battle at hand, she could not let down the defenses that surrounded her heart. Could she?

As her father’s hostess, she had travelled with him to Brussels where he served with the British delegation. Duty had taken her that night to the Duchess of Richmond’s ball. The last man she ever expected to see was Robert, who as a young captain of few prospects, had offered for her, only to be turned out by her father so that she could make an alliance with a much older, and better positioned (wealthy), aristocrat.Now, their forces were sure to engage Napoleon and the resurgent Grande Armée. Meeting Robert again just before he was to be pulled into such a horrific maelstrom surely was Fate’s cruelest trick ever. A fate her heart could not possibly withstand.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Charles Lennox 4th Duke of Richmond
December 9 1764 – August 28 1819
(Note that we profiled the Duke previously in May of 2013)

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Charles Lennox

Richmond was born to of General Lord George Lennox, the younger son of Charles Lennox, 2nd Duke of Richmond, and Lady Louisa, daughter of William Kerr, 4th Marquess of Lothian.

Richmond was a keen cricketer. He was an accomplished right-hand bat and a noted wicket-keeper. He was a founding member of the Marylebone Cricket Club. In 1786, with the Earl of Winchilsea, Richmond offered Thomas Lord a guarantee against any losses Lord might suffer on starting a new cricket ground. This led to Lord opening his cricket ground in 1787. Lennox’ and Winchilsea’s guarantee provided the genesis of the best-known cricket ground in the world, the Home of Cricket. Nearly always listed as the Hon. Colonel Charles Lennox, Lennox had 55 recorded first-class appearances from 1784 to 1800 and played a few more games after that.

Richmond became a British Army captain at 23 in 1787. In 1789, while a colonel in the Duke of York’s regiment, he was involved in a duel with Prince Frederick, Duke of York. At Wimbledon Common, Lennox fired, but his ball “grazed his Royal Highness’s curl”; the Royal Duke did not fire. Colonel Lennox shortly after exchanged for a commission of Lieutenant-Colonel in the 35th. Later the same year, he was involved in another duel, with Theophilus Swift, Esq. They met and Swift was wounded in the body, but recovered.

Later that year he married Lady Charlotte Gordon. In 1794 and 1795 he participated in naval engagements against the French in the West Indies and Gibraltar. He was sent home when he came into conflict with his superiors. He was also MP for Sussex, succeeding his father, from 1790 until he succeeded to the dukedom.

He became the 4th Duke of Richmond on 29 December 1806, after the death of his uncle, Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond. In April 1807 he became Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. He remained in that post until 1813, with Arthur Wellesley as his secretary. He participated in the Napoleonic Wars and in 1815 he was in command of a reserve force in Brussels. On 15 June, the night before the Battle of Quatre Bras, his wife held a ball for his fellow officers. Although he observed the battle the next day, as well as Waterloo on 18 June, he did not participate in either.

In 1818 he was appointed Governor General of British North America. During the summer of 1819 Richmond undertook an extensive tour of Upper and Lower Canada. At William Henry (Sorel, Que.) he was bitten on the hand by a fox. The injury apparently healed, and he continued to York (Toronto) and Niagara (Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ont.), even examining military sites as far distant as Drummond Island. Returning to Kingston, he planned a leisurely visit to the settlements on the Rideau. During this part of the journey the first symptoms of hydrophobia appeared. The disease developed rapidly and on 28 August he died in extreme agony in a barn a few miles from a settlement that had been named in his honour. Some accounts suggest that the duke had been bitten by a dog; stronger contemporary evidence, however, supports the view that he had received the rabies infection from a fox. Richmond’s body was brought back to Quebec, where on 4 September he was buried in the Cathedral of the Holy Trinity.

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Richmond had fourteen children:

  • Charles Gordon-Lennox, 5th Duke of Richmond.
  • Lady Mary Lennox, married Sir Charles Fitzroy.
  • Lt.-Col. Lord John George Lennox, married Louisa Rodney and had issue.
  • Lady Sarah Lennox, married Peregrine Maitland.
  • Lady Georgiana Lennox, married William FitzGerald-de Ros, 23rd Baron de Ros.
  • Lord Henry Adam Lennox.
  • Lord William Pitt Lennox, married first Mary Anne Paton & 2nd Ellen Smith.
  • Lady Jane Lennox, married Laurence Peel..
  • Captain Lord Frederick Lennox.
  • Lord Sussex Lennox, married Hon. Mary Lawless.
  • Lady Louisa Maddelena Lennox, married Rt. Hon. William Tighe.
  • Lady Charlotte Lennox, married Maurice Berkeley, 1st Baron FitzHardinge of Bristol.
  • Lt.-Col. Lord Arthur Lennox, married Adelaide Campbell.
  • Lady Sophia Georgiana Lennox, married Lord Thomas Cecil.

And Coming on April 1st, 2015
Beaux Ballrooms and Battles anthology, celebrating the 200th anniversary of the victory at Waterloo in story.

BBBCover-2015-03-20-06-00.jpg

Looks good, huh? The talented writer and digital artist, Aileen Fish created this.

It will be available digitally for $.99 and then after a short period of time sell for the regular price of $4.99

The Trade Paperback version will sell for $12.99

Wellington1Grey-2015-03-20-06-00.jpg

My story in the anthology is entitled: Not a Close Run Thing at All, which of course is a play on the famous misquote attributed to Arthur Wellesley, “a damn close-run thing” which really was “It has been a damned nice thing — the nearest run thing you ever saw in your life.”

Samantha, Lady Worcester had thought love was over for her, much like the war should have been. The Bastille had fallen shortly after she had been born. Her entire life the French and their Revolution had affected her and all whom she knew. Even to having determined who she married, though her husband now had been dead and buried these eight years.

Yet now Robert Barnes, a major-general in command of one of Wellington’s brigades, had appeared before her, years since he had been forgotten and dismissed. The man she had once loved, but because he had only been a captain with no fortune, her father had shown him the door.

With a battle at hand, she could not let down the defenses that surrounded her heart. Could she?

As her father’s hostess, she had travelled with him to Brussels where he served with the British delegation. Duty had taken her that night to the Duchess of Richmond’s ball. The last man she ever expected to see was Robert, who as a young captain of few prospects, had offered for her, only to be turned out by her father so that she could make an alliance with a much older, and better positioned (wealthy), aristocrat.Now, their forces were sure to engage Napoleon and the resurgent Grande Armée. Meeting Robert again just before he was to be pulled into such a horrific maelstrom surely was Fate’s cruelest trick ever. A fate her heart could not possibly withstand.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Charles Gordon Lennox 5th Duke of Richmond
3 August 1791 – 21 October 1860

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Charles Gordon-Lennox, 5th Duke of Richmond and 5th Duke of Lennox, 5th Duke of Aubigny

Richmond was the son of Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond, and the former Lady Charlotte Gordon. He was educated at Westminster and Trinity College, Dublin.

Richmond (while Earl of March) served on Wellington’s staff in the Peninsular War, during which time he volunteered to join the 52nd (Oxfordshire) Regiment of Foot’s advance storming party on the fortress of Ciudad Rodrigo.

He formally joined the 52nd Foot in 1813, and took command of a company of 52nd soldiers at Orthez in 1814, where he was severely wounded; the musket-ball in his chest was never removed. During the Battle of Waterloo he was ADC to the Prince of Orange, and following that man’s wounding, served as ADC to Wellington.

Richmond was chiefly responsible for the belated institution in 1847 of the Military General Service Medal for all survivors of the campaigns between 1793 and 1814. (There had only hitherto been a Waterloo Medal). He campaigned in Parliament and also enlisted the interest of Queen Victoria. Richmond himself received the medal with eight clasps.

Richmond sat as Member of Parliament for Chichester between 1812 and 1819. The latter year he succeeded his father in the dukedom and entered the House of Lords. He was a vehement opponent in the House of Lords of Roman Catholic emancipation, and at a later date a leader of the opposition to Peel’s free trade policy, being the president of the Central Agricultural Protection Society to try and preserve the Corn Laws.

Although a vigorous Conservative and Ultra-Tory for most of his career, Richmond’s anger with Wellington over Catholic Emancipation led him to lead the Ultra’s into joining Earl Grey’s reforming Whig government in 1830. He served under Grey as Postmaster General between 1830 and 1834. He was sworn of the Privy Council in 1830. Richmond was also Lord Lieutenant of Sussex between 1835 and 1860 and was appointed a Knight of the Garter in 1829.

In 1836, on inheriting the estates of his mother’s brother, the fifth and last Duke of Gordon, he assumed the name of Gordon before that of Lennox.

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Richmond married Lady Caroline, daughter of Henry Paget, 1st Marquess of Anglesey and Lady Caroline Villiers, on 10 April 1817. The couple had five sons and five daughters, including:

  • Charles Gordon-Lennox, 6th Duke of Richmond
  • Lady Caroline Amelia Gordon-Lennox, married John Ponsonby, 5th Earl of Bessborough
  • Fitzroy George Charles Gordon-Lennox, lost at sea aboard SS President
  • Rt. Hon. Lord Henry Charles George Gordon-Lennox, married Amelia Brooman and left no issue
  • Captain Lord Alexander Francis Charles Gordon-Lennox, married Emily Towneley and left issue
  • Lady Augusta Catherine Gordon-Lennox, married Prince Edward of Saxe-Weimar
  • Lord George Charles Gordon-Lennox, married Minnie Palmer
  • Lady Cecilia Catherine Gordon-Lennox, married Charles Bingham, 4th Earl of Lucan

Richmond died at Portland Place, Marylebone, London, in October 1860, aged 69. The Duchess of Richmond died in March 1874, aged 77.

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