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Posts Tagged ‘Beau Brummell’

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Sir Lumley St. George Skeffington
March 23 1771-November 10 1850

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Sir Lumley St. George Skeffington

Skiffy was a member of the Carlton House set and a friend to George IV. He was the 2nd Baronet, a playwright and a fop. He attended Newcome’s School in Hackney and got his taste for drama there. In May of 1802 he presented a five act play at Covent Garden titled The Word of Honour and followed the next season at Drury Lane with The High Road to Marriage. Both moderately successful, but his major achievement was The Sleeping Beauty in 1805 at Drury Lane.

Other plays were Maids and Bachelors, The Mysterious Bride, Bombastes Furioso, Ethelinde, and Lose no Time. None were printed except for a few portions of Beauty. He never married so the title became extinct when he died. George IV consulted Skiffy for his taste on dress and style. He invented the color Skeffington Brown.

Gillray caricatured him, Byron and Moore satirized him. He was described as “A thin pallid little man with sharp features and rouged cheeks, and the atmosphere of a perfume shop.” He designed his own clothes and was said to spend 800 pounds a year on them. Skiffy was also a friend of Shelley’s from their Eaton days, and sat in White’s in the famous bow window with Beau Brummell.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Sir Henry Mildmay (4th Baronet?)
1787-1848

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There is not much to report on Sir Henry. He was the friend of Beau Brummell who along with Alvanley and Pierpoint held the infamous ball in 1813 where George, who was Prince Regent at the time, gave Brummell and Mildmay the cut direct. There was an MP for Hampshire, Sir Henry Mildmay, from May of 1807 to December of 1808 (DWW-Could there be 2?.) There is also a citation that shows the rift between George and Mildmay dates to 1811 where Prinny cut Mildmay also.

He was married and his handsome wife died after 363 days of wedded bliss. Then in 1815 Sir Henry married his deceased wife’s sister Harriet at Wurtemberg and then had three sons. Harriet died at 34 years of age in 1834, and was buried in Milan. She had already been married (DWW-she was 15) when she went away with Sir Henry. There was a criminal case against her for damages and the highest award ever at Fifteen thousand pounds.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Hon. Frederick Gerald aka “Poodle” Byng
December 4 1784-1871

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Byng is the 4th from the left with the poodle

Byng was the son of the 5th Viscount Torrington, John Byng. Poodle was one of 14 children. Byng served in the army as a cornet and ensign, then a clerk in the Foreign Office. He was the Westminster commissioner of Sewers and when he retired from the Foreign Office in 1839 he devoted himself to the sanitary movement,

Either his friend Beau Brummell, George Canning or a young lady gave him the nickname Poodle. Possibly because he had curly hair, or the Brummell story that he was in the park in his carriage with a poodle and Brummell said, “ah, how d’ ye do, Byng? A family vehicle, I see.”

Poodle said he was a page of honor at Prince George’s wedding in 1791 but had little memory beyond that George had thick calves. He was a gossip and an eccentric. He had many acquaintances and love affairs. After the maid of his mother gave birth to his child, they married. (DWW-An upstairs-belowstairs romance.)

Canning had him escort the Hawaiian King Kamehameha II about London when they visited in 1824. The King and Queen died in the Osborne Hotel in July of 1824 from measles and inflammation of the lungs. He was one of Brummell’s set and sat in the bow window at White’s. At the end of his life he was known as a Regency Remnant

Previous Notables (Click to see the Blog):

George III George IV Georgiana Cavendish
William IV Lady Hester Stanhope Lady Caroline Lamb
Princess Charlotte Queen Charlotte Charles James Fox
Queen Adelaide Dorothea Jordan Jane Austen
Maria Fitzherbert Lord Byron John Keats
Princess Caroline Percy Bysshe Shelley Cassandra Austen
Edmund Kean Thomas Clarkson Sir John Moore
John Burgoyne William Wilberforce Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Sarah Siddons Josiah Wedgwood Emma Hamilton
Hannah More John Phillip Kemble John Jervis, Earl St. Vincent
Ann Hatton Stephen Kemble Mary Robinson
Harriet Mellon Zachary Macaulay George Elphinstone
Thomas Babington George Romney Mary Moser
Ozias Humphry William Hayley Daniel Mendoza
Edward Pellew Angelica Kauffman Sir William Hamilton
David Garrick Pownoll Bastard Pellew Charles Arbuthnot
William Upcott William Huskisson Dominic Serres
Sir George Barlow Scrope Davies Charles Francis Greville
George Stubbs Fanny Kemble Thomas Warton
William Mason Thomas Troubridge Charles Stanhope
Robert Fulke Greville Gentleman John Jackson Ann Radcliffe
Edward ‘Golden Ball’ Hughes John Opie Adam Walker
John Ireland Henry Pierrepoint Robert Stephenson
Mary Shelley Sir Joshua Reynolds Francis Place
Richard Harding Evans Lord Thomas Foley Francis Burdett
John Gale Jones George Parker Bidder Sir George Warren
Edward Eliot William Beechey Eva Marie Veigel
Hugh Percy-Northumberland Charles Philip Yorke Lord Palmerston
Samuel Romilly John Petty 2nd Marquess Lansdowne Henry Herbert Southey
Stapleton Cotton Colin Macaulay Amelia Opie
Sir James Hall Henry Thomas Colebrooke Maria Foote
Sir David Baird Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville Dr. Robert Gooch
William Baillie James Northcote Horatio Nelson
Henry Fuseli Home Riggs Popham John Playfair
Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice 3rd Marquess Lansdowne Thomas Douglas 5th Earl of Selkirk



There will be many other notables coming, a full and changing list can be found here on the blog as I keep adding to it. The list so far is:

  • Alexander Mackenzie
  • Adam Ferguson of Raith
  • Nevil Maskelyne
  • Dugald Stewart
  • James Playfair
  • William Playfair
  • William Henry Playfair
  • William Ludlam
  • James Hutton
  • Astley Cooper
  • John Boydell
  • Benjamin Tucker
  • Sir Robert Calder
  • Viscount Robert Castlereagh
  • George Rose
  • George Canning
  • Henry Blackwood
  • John Pasco
  • Eliab Harvey
  • Alexander Ball
  • Captain Thomas Foley
  • William Beatty
  • Sir Sidney Smith
  • Geroge Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer
  • John Thomas Duckworth
  • Admiral Adam Duncan
  • Edward Berry
  • Robert Linzee
  • David Dundas
  • Sir Hyde Parker
  • Sir Thomas Hardy
  • Charles Stuart (British Army Officer)
  • Skeffington Lutwidge
  • Mark Robinson
  • William Locker
  • Sir Peter Parker
  • William Parker
  • Major General John Dalling
  • William Cornwallis
  • William Hotham
  • Captain William Baillie (Engraver)
  • William Baillie (artist)
  • Benjamin Travers
  • Sir Ralph Abercromby
  • Sir Hector Munro
  • James Kenney
  • Elizabeth Inchbald
  • George Colman the Younger
  • Thomas Morton
  • John Liston
  • Tyrone Power
  • Colonel William Berkeley
  • Barry Proctor
  • William Henry West Betty
  • Sir George Colebrooke
  • Joseph John Gurney
  • James Hutton
  • Robert Emmet
  • William Taylor of Norwich
  • Sir William Knighton
  • John Romilly
  • Sir John Herschel
  • John Horne Tooke
  • James Mill
  • Edward Hall Alderson
  • Henry Perronet Briggs
  • Robert Owen
  • Jeremy Bentham
  • Joseph Hume
  • Sir Walter Scott
  • Charles Lamb
  • John Stuart Mill
  • Thomas Cochrane
  • James Paull
  • Claire Clairmont
  • William Lovett
  • Sir John Vaughan
  • Fanny Imlay
  • William Godwin
  • Mary Wollstonecraft
  • General Sir Robert Arbuthnot
  • Harriet Fane Arbuthnot
  • Joseph Antonio Emidy
  • James Edwards (Bookseller)
  • William Gifford
  • John Wolcot (Peter Pindar)
  • Sir Joseph Banks
  • Richard Porson
  • Edward Gibbon
  • James Smithson
  • William Cowper
  • Richard Cumberland
  • Richard Cosway
  • Jacob Phillipp Hackert
  • John Thomas Serres
  • Wellington (the Military man)
  • William Vincent
  • Cuthbert Collingwood
  • Admiral Sir Graham Moore
  • Admiral Sir William Sydney Smith
  • Admiral Sir Joseph Sydney Yorke
  • Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville
  • William Howe
  • Richard Howe
  • Viscount Samuel Hood
  • Thomas Hope
  • Baroness de Calabrella
  • Thomas Babington Macaulay
  • Harriet Martineau
  • Napoleon Bonaparte
  • Sir Edward Michael Pakenham
  • Admiral Israel Pellew
  • General Banastre Tarleton
  • Henry Paget
  • Francis Leggatt Chantrey
  • Sir Charles Grey
  • Thomas Picton
  • John Constable
  • Thomas Lawrence
  • George Cruikshank
  • Thomas Gainsborough
  • James Gillray
  • George Stubbs
  • Joseph Priestley
  • Horace Walpole
  • John Thomas ‘Antiquity’ Smith
  • Thomas Coutts
  • Angela Burdett-Coutts
  • Sir Anthony Carlisle
  • Thomas Rowlandson
  • William Blake
  • Isambard Kingdom Brunel
  • Sir Marc Brunel
  • Marquis of Stafford Granville Leveson-Gower
  • Marquis of Stafford George Leveson-Gower
  • George Stephenson
  • Nicholas Wood
  • Edward Pease
  • Thomas Telford
  • Joseph Locke
  • Paul III Anton, Prince Esterházy
  • Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton
  • John Nash
  • Matthew Gregory Lewis
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Robert Southey
  • Thomas Hope
  • Henry Holland
  • Sir Walter Scott
  • Lord Elgin
  • Henry Moyes
  • Jeffery Wyatville
  • Hester Thrale
  • William Windham
  • Madame de Stael
  • Joseph Black
  • John Walker
  • James Boswell
  • Edward John Eliot
  • Edward James Eliot
  • Edward Law, 1st Baron Ellenborough
  • George Combe
  • William Harrison Ainsworth
  • Sir Harry Smith
  • Thomas Cochrane
  • Warren Hastings
  • Edmund Burke
  • William Petty
  • Juana Maria de Los Dolores de Leon (Lady Smith)
  • Lord Barrymore, Richard Barry (1769-1794)
  • Lord Bedford, Francis Russell (1765-1802)
  • Mr. G. Dawson Damer (1788-1856)
  • Colonel George Hanger (c.1751-1824)
  • Lord Hertford, Francis Seymour-Ingram (1743-1822)
  • Lord Yarmouth, Francis Charles Seymour-Ingram (1777-1842)
  • Earl of Jersey, George Bussey Villiers (1735-1805)
  • Sir John , John Lade (1759-1838)
  • Louis Philippe Joseph, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1785 as Duc d’ Orleans (1747-1793)
  • Louis Philippe, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1793 as Duc d’ Orleans (1773-1850)
  • Captain John (Jack) Willett Payne (1752-1803)
  • Lord Sefton, William Philip Molyneux (1772-1838)
  • Admiral Lord Hugh Seymour (1759-1801)
  • Sir Lumley St. George Skeffington Baronet (1771 – 1850)
  • Lord Worcester, Henry Somerset (1766-1835)
  • Lord Worcester, Henry Somerset (1792-1853)

The Dukes

  •         Duke of Richmond, Charles Lennox 3rd Duke
  •         Duke of Richmond, Charles Lennox 4th Duke (1764-1819)
  •         Duke of Richmond, Charles Gordon Lennox 5th Duke (1791-1860)
  •         Duke of Devonshire, William Cavendish (1748-1811)
  •         Duke of Norfolk, Charles Howard (1746-1815)
  •         Duke of Norfolk, Bernard Edward Howard (1765-1842)
  •         Duke of Norfolk, Henry Charles Howard (1791-1856)
  •         Duke of Somerset, Edward St. Maur (1775-1855)
  •         Duke of Somerset, Edward Adolphus Seymour (1804-1885)
  •         Duke of Argyll, George William Campbell (1766-1839)
  •         Duke of Queensberry, William Douglas (1724-1810)
  •         Duke of Rutland, John Henry Manners(1778-1857)
  •         Duke of York , Frederick Augustus Hanover (1763-1827)
  •         Duke of St. Albans,William Aubrey de Vere Beauclerk 9th Duke
  •         Duke of Grafton, Augustus Henry FitzRoy, 3rd Duke 1735-1811
  •         Duke of Grafton, George FitzRoy, 4th Duke 1760-1844
  •         Duke of Grafton, Henry FitzRoy, 5th Duke 1790-1863

The Dandy Club

  •         Beau Brummell
  •         William Arden, 2nd Baron Alvanley
  •         Henry Mildmay

Patronesses of Almacks

  •         Emily Lamb, Lady Cowper
  •         Amelia Stewart, Viscountess Castlereagh
  •         Sarah Villiers, Countess of Jersey
  •         Maria Molyneux, Countess of Sefton
  •         Mrs. Drummond Burrell
  •         Dorothea Lieven, Countess de Lieven, wife of the Russian Ambassador
  •         Countess Esterhazy, wife of the Austrian Ambassador

If there are any requests for personalities to be added to the list, just let us know in the comments section

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Scrope Berdmre Davies
1782-May 23 1852

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Davies was a member of the Dandy Set. His father was the Reverend Richard Davies and he had five brothers and four sisters. His mother was the daughter of another Reverend. Davies was elected to king’s scholarship at Eton College, which made Scrope the man he was to become. Scrope became a wit, a dandy, and a scholar. He also became a gambler, a drunkard and a spendthrift, and led to his ruination.

Scrope started Eton in 1794 and went on to King’s College, Cambridge in 1802. At college he met Byron and became fast friends with the man. Byron used Davies to borrow money and as a guarantor of his loans. Davies now was a great gambler, in 1815 he thought to have had a fortune of £22,000, Byron mooched off the man. A trunk that was uncovered in 1976 disclosed that Davies kept meticulous notes about his situation as well as his gambling strategies.

He was an enthusiast of pugilism (boxing) and he was a good shot, as well as a jester. Davies also took up with many of the loves that Byron discarded including Caroline Lamb, Lady Oxford and Lady Webster. He took up residence in Cambridge and London, his life scheduled around the racing season and the gambling tables. A member of Watiers, he also could be found at Brooks, the Union Club and the Cocoa Tree.

Such a good friend to Byron, he brought back several of the manuscripts for John Murray after visiting his friend. In 1819, the rich dandy started to take a financial turn for the worse. He went into exile in January of 1820 and died in Paris in 1852.

Previous Notables (Click to see the Blog):

George III George IV Georgiana Cavendish
William IV Lady Hester Stanhope Lady Caroline Lamb
Princess Charlotte Queen Charlotte Charles James Fox
Queen Adelaide Dorothea Jordan Jane Austen
Maria Fitzherbert Lord Byron John Keats
Princess Caroline Percy Bysshe Shelley Cassandra Austen
Edmund Kean Thomas Clarkson Sir John Moore
John Burgoyne William Wilberforce Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Sarah Siddons Josiah Wedgwood Emma Hamilton
Hannah More John Phillip Kemble John Jervis, Earl St. Vincent
Ann Hatton Stephen Kemble Mary Robinson
Harriet Mellon Zachary Macaulay George Elphinstone
Thomas Babington George Romney Mary Moser
Ozias Humphry William Hayley Daniel Mendoza
Edward Pellew Angelica Kauffman Sir William Hamilton
David Garrick Pownoll Bastard Pellew Charles Arbuthnot
William Upcott William Huskisson Dominic Serres
Sir George Barlow

There will be many other notables coming, a full and changing list can be found here on the blog as I keep adding to it. The list so far is:

General Sir Robert Arbuthnot
Harriet Fane Arbuthnot
Richard Harding Evans
Joseph Antonio Emidy
John Ireland
William Gifford
John Wolcot
Richard Porson
Eva Marie Veigel
‘Gentleman’ John Jackson
Edward Gibbon
William Mason
Thomas Warton
Adam Walker
John Opie
William Cowper
Richard Cumberland
Richard Cosway
Jacob Phillipp Hackert
Sir George Warren
John Thomas Serres
Wellington (the Military man)
Horatio Nelson
Cuthbert Collingwood
Thomas Troubridge
Admiral Sir Graham Moore
Admiral Sir William Sydney Smith
Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville
Howe
Viscount Hood
Thomas Hope
Charles Greville
Colin Mccaulay
Thomas Babington Macaulay
Napoleon Bonaparte
Packenham
Admiral Israel Pellew
General Banastre Tarleton
Henry Paget
Stapleton Cotton
Sir Charles Grey
Thomas Picton
Constable
Lawrence
Cruikshank
Thomas Gainsborough
Gillray
Sir Joshua Reynolds
George Stubbs
Joseph Priestley
William Aubrey de Vere Beauclerk 9th Duke of St. Albans
Hugh Percy, 3rd Duke of Northumberland
Horace Walpole
John Thomas ‘Antiquity’ Smith
Thomas Coutts
Rowlandson
William Blake
Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Sir Marc Brunel
Marquis of Stafford George Leveson-Gower
George Stephenson
Robert Stephenson
Fanny Kemble
Mary Shelley
Ann Radcliffe
Paul III Anton, Prince Esterházy
Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton
Henry Herbert Southey
John Nash
Matthew Gregory Lewis
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Thomas Hope
William Beechey
Henry Holland
Sir Walter Scott
Lord Elgin
Jeffery Wyatville
Hester Thrale
William Windham
Madame de Stael
James Boswell
Edward Eliot
George Combe
Sir Harry Smith
Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond
Juana Maria de Los Dolores de Leon (Lady Smith)
Duke of Argyll, George William Campbell (1766-1839)
Lord Barrymore, Richard Barry (1769-1794)
Lord Bedford, Francis Russell (1765-1802)
Mr. G. Dawson Damer (1788-1856)
Duke of Devonshire, William Cavendish (1748-1811)
Lord Foley, Thomas Foley (1780-1833)
Colonel George Hanger (c.1751-1824)
Lord Hertford, Francis Seymour-Ingram (1743-1822)
Lord Yarmouth, Francis Charles Seymour-Ingram (1777-1842)
Edward “Golden Ball” Hughes (1798-1863)
Earl of Jersey, George Bussey Villiers (1735-1805)
Sir John , John Lade (1759-1838)
Duke of Norfolk, Charles Howard (1746-1815)
Duke of York , Frederick Augustus Hanover (1763-1827)
Louis Philippe Joseph, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1785 as Duc d’ Orleans (1747-1793)
Louis Philippe, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1793 as Duc d’ Orleans (1773-1850)
Captain John (Jack) Willett Payne (1752-1803)
Viscount Petersham, Charles Stanhope(1780-1851)
Duke of Queensberry, William Douglas (1724-1810)
Duke of Rutland, John Henry Manners(1778-1857)
Lord Sefton, William Philip Molyneux (1772-1838)
Admiral Lord Hugh Seymour (1759-1801)
Sir Lumley St. George Skeffington Baronet (1771 – 1850)
Lord Worcester, Henry Somerset (1766-1835)
Lord Worcester, Henry Somerset (1792-1853)
Hon. Frederick Gerald aka “Poodle” Byng
Thomas Cochrane
Warren Hastings
Edmund Burke

The Dandy Club
Beau Brummell
William Arden, 2nd Baron Alvanley
Henry Mildmay
Henry Pierrepoint

Patronesses of Almacks
Emily Lamb, Lady Cowper
Amelia Stewart, Viscountess Castlereagh
Sarah Villiers, Countess of Jersey
Maria Molyneux, Countess of Sefton
Mrs. Drummond Burrell
Dorothea Lieven, Countess de Lieven, wife of the Russian Ambassador
        Countess Esterhazy, wife of the Austrian Ambassador

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History

As last week we spent time with Brooks Gentleman’s club, it is only correct that we venture across the street both literally and figuratively and go to Boodles. After this, we should venture to White’s, perhaps the most famous of clubs for the men of the Ton in a future blog and having discussed Waiter’s we should look in there as well in future weeks. My NaNoWriMo novel at the end of last year I have given a work title to of The Other Shoe. While working through it I did some research on Gentleman’s Clubs and thought why not delve into other parts of the Regency besides the Squares I have been reporting on. Many of the scenes of the heroes in our stories are set at their clubs.

Boodles Gentlemen’s Club

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Founded in 1762 by the Earl of Shelburne, William Petty-FitzMaurice who later became the 1st Marquess of Lansdowne and the Prime Minister of England during the last days of the Revolutionary War, or that trifling thing regarding the colonies. (Just a little representation for our taxation and what coulda, shoulda, woulda, wow, think of the possibilities if the americas were still the colonies…)

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Shelburne was a Whig statement and this club served to be a second place for such to enjoy a day without women in it. It first opened on Pall Mall but in 1782 took over the Savoir Vivre space at 28 St. James Street which is across from Brooks Gentlemen’s club. The club in recent rimes has had such members as Ian Fleming who gave us James Bond, and David Niven who at one time was the Pink Panther…

Such notables who lived during the Regency and were members of the club include menbers we met at Brooks as well. Such as Beau Brummell, William Wilberforce, William Cavendish the 5th Duke of Devonshire. Here we also would see Arthur Wellesley, the 1st Duke of Wellington PastedGraphic2-2012-04-25-21-03.jpg. Also a member was John Fane, PastedGraphic3-2012-04-25-21-03.jpgthe 10th Earl of Westmoreland who really did run away to Gretna Green to marry Sarah Anne ChildPastedGraphic4-2012-04-25-21-03.jpg and looked to be a regency beauty as well as the rich daughter of a banker. The banker though cut his daughter and his grandsons from his will. He left his money to his granddaughter so the Fane name would not have access to his fortune.

So many major men of the Regency were members of Brooks that we have a place to when in London, our heroes will be drawn to for it is the magnet for them socially.

A Trolling We Will Go

I released a new book, an omnibus of the three first Trolling stories. In honor of that I have made the first tale of Humphrey and Gwendolyn available for a limited time for $.99 TrollingOmnibus-2012-04-25-21-03.jpg This introductory price is so those who have not discovered this fantasy work can delve into it for a very incentivised price and see if they like the series and continue on, either ordering the other two stories separately, or ordering all three in the Omnibus edition. There are still two more in the series for me to wrap up with edits and release. They have been written as those who follow my blog know. Just not yet gone through my final check protocols.

The Writing LIfe

I am now near 100 pages (about 30000 words, into writing on The Crown Imposter. A fantasy that has had two different ideas about for the last few years. Neither was working by when I decided to combine them, all of sudden it worked and I wanted to write. Something I have been too exhausted to do these last few months

I enclose a few paragraphs from the first draft and first chapter for perusal.

Chapter 1

        The door opened letting a cold blast of saturated wetness force it’s way into what should have remained a warm and cozy space. Sergeant Middlin grunted but caught his tongue before he cursed aloud. The young Baron turned as he entered the room and pushed hard to shut the door against the raging storm.

        Middlin had sons the Baron’s age. Sons older than the young man if truth were told. He knew holding his tongue was called for at that moment. At least holding some of the obvious things he would say to another man who was not his overlord.

        “Everything as it should be?”

        The Baron, Damien Everheart, had strode to the blazing fire that they had stoked to greatness once the first signs of the storm had become evident some hours before.

        The young man said, “Aye, you were right. All was good. The sentries were in their coveys and hides. You know though I did not go out just to see if they were obeying my orders.” Middlin nodded to that. The Sergeant had charge of the boy, now man, for over a decade. Middlin and a couple others. They had seen to training him for his duties.

        Duties, that with his father’s recent death, Damien had now assumed.

        “‘Course. Wanting the men to know you share in their burdens earns their trust and respect. I taught you that. But there is a limit. You catch sick from all that water nows that drenched your bones and then the Barony be without a leader.”

        Damien smirked a quick laugh, “I’ll stand here in front of the fire and warm myself. I’ll be as dry as bone in three shakes of Spotters tail.” The boy referred to the dog that lay in front of the fire. Old Spot had been a puppy and gift to Damien when he first came to train in the ways of fighting and of ruling. Now the dog had grown old these dozen years since.

        “Fool boy. You need to learn that you take care of yourself proper and you don’t need to worry about getting sick. Rushing about in a storm is a sure way to get sick, no matter how long you stand in front of a fire after.” Middlin knew that advice would not be heeded. He probably had heard something the same when he was young from an oldster, and just as Damien, ignored it. Now as his bones knew ache from the cold and wet, he knew the words to be true.

        “As you say. But you also taught me about showing myself to the men when they are in hardship. They stand watch in the cold and wet now, and they know I am colder and wetter than they are. And they know that I think it is important what they are doing out there. Standing guard.”

        Middlin shook his head. He was not going to win a battle of wits with the Baron. Damien was bright and there was no getting around him for he was stubborn too. And well he should be. He was the lord and now, the Barony was right on the border of the kingdom.

        “Your damnable cousin is responsible for all this mess, and for you having to go make the rounds of the watch. Five years ago, his Duchy protected us against the Altans. Now that he is king of all them Altans he caused all the problems that be facing us!” Middlin said with some feeling. He worried that sooner, rather than later, there was going to be war. Prince Brion, the king’s son was hot headed, if all the tales he had heard of that young man were true.

        And a hot headed prince was sure to want to make a name for himself. Retaking for the kingdom of Centrion what had been the most prosperous Duchy of the kingdom, and doing so by force of arms, was one way to add the moniker Conqueror to Brion’s name.

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History

This week another break from the Squares of London. My NaNoWriMo novel at the end of last year I have given a work title to of The Other Shoe. While working through it I did some research on Gentleman’s Clubs and thought why not delve into other parts of the Regency besides the Squares I have been reporting on. Many of the scenes of the heroes in our stories are set at their clubs.

Brooks Club

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27 men, four of whom were Dukes, set up the club in 1764. It remains one of the most exclusive gentlemen’s clubs still. It was the meeting place for Whigs of the highest rung of the Ton.

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Originally in Pall Mall, it was managed by William Almack who also ran the famed Assembly Rooms with his name. (Managing one place which was the domain of ladies that men were invited to visit, and a place where no ‘Lady’ was invited at all.)

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The current building is on St. James Street and was managed by Brooks who survived its opening there in 1778 by only three years. It is across the street from Boodles, and just up the street is the Carlton club which is associated with the Tories.

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When in London and needing a distraction, riding and hunting being unavailable, the children and the women making such a caterwauling that a lord could just not stand it, what better place to go to then to the club. Here you could meet friends. There was a kitchen that provided large meals, but not great ones. Waiters was thus founded in 1806 for a better dining experience.

Then the gaming rooms became a mainstay of the club. The Betting book at Brooks has many examples of eccentric bets. Some bets so outrageous and impossible for the time that they remain unresolved.

One of the most famous of all the clubs that exist in the Regency period is Brooks. Such notables who lived during the Regency and were members of the club were William Cavendish-Bentinck, the 3rd Duke of Portland who was Prime Minister twice.PastedGraphic-2012-04-21-14-05.jpg William Cavendish,PastedGraphic1-2012-04-21-14-05.jpg the fifth duke of Devonshire, husband of the incomparable GeorgianaPastedGraphic2-2012-04-21-14-05.jpg Charles James Fox, PastedGraphic3-2012-04-21-14-05.jpgwho was the grandson of the 2nd Duke of Richmond, himself a grandson of Charles the II. Fox was the counter to William Pitt the Younger.PastedGraphic4-2012-04-21-14-05.jpg who was the youngest Prime Minister of the United Kingdom first, and then the second time of Great Britain as the way the country was addressed changed its name. Also a member as was his friend, William Wilberforce who was a tireless advocate of the abolition of slavery.PastedGraphic5-2012-04-21-14-05.jpg. Yet perhaps the most famous of our members will be he whom we owe the Regency to, George or often referred to in our novels, as Prinny.

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His brothers as well were members, the Duke of York PastedGraphic7-2012-04-21-14-05.jpg and the Duke of Clarence PastedGraphic8-2012-04-21-14-05.jpgwho later became King William the IV. Last we should make note of one regular visitor to the Regency Novels we write. The Beau, Beau BrummellPastedGraphic9-2012-04-21-14-05.jpgThe arbiter of good taste, leader of the Dandy club and known to sit with his friends in the window seat at White’s. He is worthy of his own posting.

So many major men of the Regency were members of Brooks that we have a place to when in London, our heroes will be drawn to for it is the magnet for them socially.

A Trolling We Will Go

I released a new book, an omnibus of the three first Trolling stories. In honor of that I have made the first tale of Humphrey and Gwendolyn available for a limited time for $.99 TrollingOmnibus-2012-04-21-14-05.jpg This introductory price is so those who have not discovered this fantasy work can delve into it for a very incentivised price and see if they like the series and continue on, either ordering the other two stories separately, or ordering all three in the Omnibus edition. There are still two more in the series for me to wrap up with edits and release. They have been written as those who follow my blog know. Just not yet gone through my final check protocols.

The Writing LIfe

I am not 78 pages (about 24000 words, into writing on The Crown Imposter. A fantasy that have had two different ideas about for the last few years. Neither was working by when I decided to combine them, all of sudden it worked and I wanted to write. Something I have been too exhausted to do these last few months

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