Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘1800’

As with the other timeline posts, there are so many graphics, and WordPress just doesn’t format tables very well, so I need to direct you to the website for this.

1800 however is now up with nearly 100 graphics.

TheRegencyEraTimeline-2012-08-7-17-59.jpg

Read Full Post »

Now that the Lexicon is finished for a time, I am back at work on the Timelines, which you can find house

TheRegencyEraTimeline-2012-08-5-14-06.jpg

And should you think that I have gone silent, such is not the case. I have now all of the entires for 1800 finished. I am in the process of adding graphics from my research and the internet. So for now I am giving you a glimpse of this:

Year Month Day Event
1800 Jan 7 Millard Fillmore, 13th US president (1850-1853), was born in Summerhill (Locke), N.Y.

1800-1-2012-08-5-14-06.jpg
1800 Jan 8 Victor of Aveyron (~1785-1828), a feral child, emerged from French forests on his own. In 1797 he had been found wandering the woods near Saint-Sernin-sur-Rance, France, and was captured, but soon escaped. He was later  portrayed in the 1969 movie, The Wild Child (L’Enfant sauvage), by François Truffaut.

1800-2012-08-5-14-06.jpg

1800 Jan 10 The US Senate ratified a peace treaty with Tunis.
1800 Jan 20 Carolina, the sister of Napoleon I, married King Joachim Murat of Naples.
1800 Jan 23 Edward Rutledge (50), US attorney (signed Declaration of Independence), died.
1800 Jan 24 Edwin Chadwick, British social reformer, was born.
1800 Jan 30 US population was reported at 5,308,483; Black population 1,002,037 (18.9%).
1800 Jan Pierre Samuel du Pont de Nemours, his two sons and their families, arrived in Newport, Rhode Island, from France.
1800 Jan Lord Elgin established his British embassy in Constantinople. His orders were to open the borders for trade, obtain entry for British ships to the Black Sea and to secure an alliance against French military expeditions in the eastern Mediterranean.
1800 Feb 11 William Henry Fox Talbot (d.1877), British inventor and pioneer in instantaneous photography, was born.
1800 Mar 14 James Bogardus, US inventor, builder (made cast-iron buildings), was born.
1800 Mar 17 English warship Queen Charlotte caught fire and 700 people died.
1800 Mar 20 French army defeated Turks at Heliopolis, Turkey, and advanced to Cairo.
1800 Apr 2 1st performance of Ludwig van Beethoven’s 1st Symphony in C.
1800 Apr 15 Sir James Clark Ross, Scottish explorer, was born. He located the Magnetic North Pole.
1800 Apr 16 George Charles Bingham, British soldier, was born. He commanded the Light Brigade during its famous charge.
1800 Apr 24 US Congress approved a bill establishing the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. with a $5,000 allocation.
1800 April April: Beethoven premiers his Symphony No. 1 in C major in Vienna.
1800 April April: English poet William Cowper dies at age 68 .
1800 May 5 Louis Hachette, French publisher (Librairie Hachette), was born.
1800 May 7 US Congress divided the Northwest Territory into two parts, and Indiana, the latter out of the western portion, including Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana and parts of Michigan and Minnesota. The provisions of the Treaty of Paris (1783) which ended the Revolutionary War, had defined the borders of the US. Among other concessions, Great Britain agreed to a line through the Great Lakes that placed in US control the territory called the Old Northwest, between the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. States that had previously laid claim to parts of the region ceded their territories in anticipation of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787.
1800 May 7 Niccolo  Piccinni (72), Italian composer (Roland), died in Paris. Gluck’s rival
1800 May 9 John Brown, American abolitionist, was born. His adventures came to an end at Harper’s Ferry, where he tried to start a revolution against slavery.
1800 May 14 Friedrich von Schiller’s “Macbeth,” premiered in Weimar
1800 May 15 King George III survived a 2nd assassination attempt.
1800 May 19 French Bosbeeck, veterinarian, robber, was hanged.
1800 May May: “The Masquerade given at the King’s Theatre, on the 1st instant, was numerously attended. Among the several characters, a Quack Doctor was most conspicuous – a Sylvester Daggerwood who had an infinite deal of nothing to say — Sailors, Countrymen, Chimney Sweepers, Flower Girls, Gipsies, a Tommy Tonsor, a band of Mrs. Montagu’s friends, a Rolla, who tore his fine speeches, full of logic and grammar, and a great number of Harlequins and Clowns, the former sans agility, the latter sans humor, filled up the scene. The supper was the best by far that has of late been given upon such an occasion, and the company was truly respectable. We cannot conclude this brief account without expressing our disapprobation of the indecent custom of men habiting themselves like women. The conduct of some persons of this description, during the evening, disgusted the greater part of the assembly; but at length some gentlemen, much to their credit, actually compelled them to retire from the merry scene.”- The Sporting Magazine
1800 May May: An assassination attempt is made on George III at Drury Lane Theatre.
1800 May May: Napoleon crosses the Alps and invades Italy.
1800 May-Dec US presidential elections were held over this period. On Dec 3 state electors met and cast their ballots and a tie resulted between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr.
1800 Jun 4 The US White House was completed and President & Mrs. John Adams moved in. [see Nov 1]
1800 Jun 14 French General Napoleon Bonaparte pushed the forces of Austria out of Italy in the Battle of Marengo. In 2007 the sword he wore was auctioned off for over $6.4 million.
1800 Jun 14 Jean-Baptiste Kleber (47), French general, architect, was murdered.
1800 June June: Napoleon drives the Austrians from Italy (which they had conquered while he was busy in Egypt) in the Battle of Marengo.
1800 June The new city of Washington in the District of Columbia became the US capital, succeeding Philadelphia. This occurred when government departments began to move into their new buildings on land ceded to the federal government by Maryland and Virginia. The radial design of the city was created by the French architect Pierre Charles L’Enfant. Construction had begun in 1791 but was delayed following L’Enfant’s dismissal in 1792. The first Congress to sit in Washington convened on Nov. 17, 1800. The first president to live in the executive mansion, John Adams moved in also in November. The first president to be inaugurated there, Thomas Jefferson was sworn into office March 4 1801. The US was the first modern nation to design a city exclusively as a capital. Free inhabitants 2,464, slaves 623.
1800 Jul 6 The Sultan of Constantinople at the behest of Lord Elgin issued written orders to his officers in Athens for cooperation with Giovanni Lusieri and the removal of sculptures from the Parthenon.
1800 Jul 8 Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse gave the 1st cowpox vaccination to his son to prevent smallpox. [see May 14, 1796]
1800 Aug 21 The US Marine Band gave its first concert near the future site of the Lincoln Memorial.
1800 Sep 6 Catherine Esther Beecher, educator who promoted higher education for women, was born in East Hampton, Long Island, NY.
1800 Sep 7 The NYC Zion AME Church was dedicated.
1800 Sep 23 William Holmes McGuffey, educator, was born. He is famous for his book “Eclectic Readers” (McGuffey Readers).
1800 September September: At the invitation of the Maltese, British troops liberate the Islands of Malta and Gozo from the French.
1800 September Cayuga Bridge, an engineering marvel of its time, was completed. It crossed the northern end of Cayuga Lake and the Montezuma Swamp in west central New York. The bridge, one and one-eighth of a mile long, was built of wood and was wide enough for wagons to pass abreast. Stages of the Genesee Turnpike used it, as did American troops in the War of 1812 on their way to the Niagara frontier. The bridge cot $150,000. It was financed by a loan from the Manhattan Company of New York City, which was founded in 1799 by Aaron Burr. Ostensibly established as a water supply company, the Manhattan Company had a charter broad enough so that it could function as a bank.
1800 Oct 1 Spain ceded Louisiana to France in a secret treaty.
1800 Oct 2 Nat Turner, slave and the property of Benjamin Turner, was born in Southampton county, Va. He was sold in 1831 to Joseph Travis from Jerusalem, Southampton county, Va.
1800 Oct 3 George Bancroft, historian, known as the “Father of American History” for his 10-volume A History of the United States, was born.
1800 Oct 7 Gabriel, slave revolt leader in Virginia, was hanged. Gabriel Prosser had mounted a slave rebellion.
1800 Oct 25 Thomas Babington Macaulay (d.1859), England, poet and historian, was born. “No particular man is necessary to the state. We may depend on it that, if we provide the country with popular institutions, those institutions will provide it with great men.”
1800 Oct 26 Helmuth Karl von Moltke, Prussian Field Marshal and Count, was born. His reorganization of the Prussian Army led to military victories that allowed the unification of Germany. His father was a German officer serving in the Danish army. His greatest innovation was the creation of a fighting force that could mobilize quickly and strike when and where it chose. He was one of the first generals to grasp the importance of railroads in moving troops. In 1995 Otto Friedrich authored a biography of the Moltke family line from Bismarck to Hitler: “Blood and Iron: From Bismarck to Hitler the von Moltke Family’s Impact on German History.”
1800 Nov 1 John and Abigail Adams moved into “the President’s House” in Washington DC. It became known as the White House during the Roosevelt administration.
1800 Nov 17 The Sixth Congress (2nd session) convened for the first time in Washington, DC, in the partially completed Capitol building. Previously, the federal capital had briefly been in  other cities, including New York, Philadelphia, and Annapolis, Maryland. George Washington- a surveyor by profession- had been assigned to find a site for a capital city somewhere along the upper Potomac River, which flows between Maryland and Virginia. Apparently expecting to become president, Washington sited the capital at the southernmost possible point, the closest commute from Mount Vernon, despite the fact that this placed the city in a swamp called Foggy Bottom.
1800 Nov 24 Carl Maria Ernst von Weber’s (1786-1826) opera “Das Waldmadchen,” was written in Freiburg.
1800 Dec 2 John Brown (d.1859), US abolitionist, was born. He was hanged for murder in the Harper’s Ferry Incident in 1859. John Brown led the raid on the Federal Arsenal at Harper’s Ferry. The incident is the backdrop for George MacDonald Fraser’s novel “Flashman and the Angel of the Lord.”
1800 Dec 3 Austrians were defeated by the French at the Battle of Hohenlinden, near Munich.
1800 Dec 3 US state electors met and cast their ballots for the presidency. A tie resulted between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr.
1800 Dec 12 Washington DC was established as the capital of US.
1800 Dec 29 Charles Goodyear (d.1860), inventor of vulcanized rubber for tires, was born.
1800 Dec In Virginia Martha Washington set all her slaves free.
1800 December December: Peace negotiations between France and Austria break down, and Napoleon sends General Moreau into Austria, where he is victorious at the Battle of Hohenlinden.
1800 December December: Washington, DC is officially established as the capital of the United States.
1800 A new edition of Lyrical Ballads is published, with a Preface by William Wordsworth (expanded in the 1802 edition) that stands as a Romantic manifesto on the nature of poetry.
1800 Jacques Louis David paints his famous Portrait of Mme. Récamier.
1800 London’s Royal College of Surgeons is founded.
1800 Maria Edgeworth’s Castle Rackrent is published.
1800 In a secret treaty with Spain, the Treaty of San Ildefonso, France regains Louisiana. 
1800 England’s population, around 5.25 million in 1720, has increased to around 9 million. World population has risen from between 600 and 680 million in 1700 to one billion, roughly calculated. The most populous cities in 1800 are: Guangzhou, China: 1.5 million.
Hangchow, China: 1,000,000
Kingtehchen, China: 1,000,000 
NanJing, China: 1,000,000
Edo (Tokyo), Japan 1,000,000 
London, England: 865,000
Beijing, China: 700,000
Constantinople (Istanbul), Turkey: 598,000
Paris, France: 548,000
Kyoto, Japan:530,000
1800 Mexico City has a population of 250,000. New York City: 60,000. Population remains sparse in areas occupied by hunter-gatherers — in Africa and the plains of North America. Areas occupied by pastoral nomads are also sparse.
1800 In the US presidential elections Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr tied in electoral votes. The selection was then moved to the House of Representatives where on the 36th ballot Vermont and Maryland switch their votes to Jefferson. [see Feb 17, 1801]
1800 France Presern (d.1849), author, painter, poet, musician, mathematician and architect, was born in Slovenia. His image was later featured on Slovenia’s 1,000-tolar bills.
1800 Johann Christian Reinhart, German artist, created his work: “The History Painter, Caricature.”
1800 Friedrich Schiller wrote his drama “Mary Stuart.” The play is compressed into the last 3 days of Mary’s life.
1800 Rev. Mason L. Weems (d.1825) authored the biography “Life of Washington.”
1800 Father Demetrius Gallitzin (1770-1840), a Russian-born Catholic priest, was directed by bishop John Carroll to investigate spirits in the home (Wizard’s Clip) of Adam Livingstone in the Shenandoah Valley.
1800 Congress allocated a room in the Capitol for the US Supreme Court.
1800 The American political “revolution” brought the Republicans to office in the (sic) first peaceful transition of power between rival political parties in human history.
1800 Worcestershire sauce was a ketchup and came out about this time.
1800 Jean Baptiste Pointe du Sable, a pioneer trader and founder of the village that became Chicago, sold his holdings and moved to a Missouri farm.
1800 The population of the world doubled from what it was in 1500 to more than 800 million. The world’s population reached about 1 billion about this time. In 1927 it reached 2 billion; in 1959 3 billion; in 1987 5 billion; in 1999 6 billion and in 2011 7 billion.
1800 William Herschel (1738-1822), German-born English astronomer, detected what later became known as infra-red red light in experiments with glass prisms and thermometers. Infrared solar rays.
1800 Alessandro Volta (1745-1827), Italian physicist, first demonstrated the electric pile or battery. Invents the electric cell.
1800 Robert Fulton (35) tested a 20-foot model of his torpedo-armed submarine on the Seine. He made two 20-minute dives himself.
1800 John Chapman (1774-1845), Johnny Appleseed, a Swedenborgian missionary, a land speculator, a heavy drinker and an eccentric dresser, began planting orchards across western Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana from seed. (T&L, 10/1980, p.42) )(AHD, p.225)(HNQ, 1/2/01)
1800 Lieven Bauwens stole a spinning “mule jenny” machine from Britain. He had it dismantled and smuggled out in a cargo of coffee. This enabled the textile industry in Ghent, Belgium, to greatly expand. Britain sentenced Bauwens to death in absentia and Ghent made him a hero.
1800 Mary Robinson (42/43), writer, actress, courtesan and fashion icon, died. In 2005 Sarah Gristwood authored “Perdita: Royal Mistress, Writer and Romantic.” Paula Byrne authored Perdita: The Literary, Theatrical, Scandalous Life of Mary Robinson.”
1800 The Parliament in Westminster passed an Act of Union formally binding Ireland with England and abolished the Irish parliament. The Act of Union entailed the loss of legislative independence of the Irish Parliament.
1800 The French regained the territory of Louisiana from Spain by the secret Treaty of Ildefenso.
1800 Dessalines, a lieutenant of Haitian rebel leader Toussaint L’Ouverture (Louverture),  butchered many mulattoes (the estimates range from 200 to 10,000).
1800 The Althing of Iceland was abolished by the Danish king.
1800 About this time an Arab nomadic tribe settled in the southern Israeli desert of Negev. The Al-Sayyid community that developed there grew with a high incidence of profound deafness due to a recessive gene. The village developed a sign language in response that came to be called the Al-Sayyid Bedouin Sign Language (ABSL). In 2007 Margalit Fox authored “Signs and Wonders,” which told the Al-Sayyid story as part of a history of linguistics and sign language in American and the world.
1800 Ito Jakuchu (b.1716), Japanese painter based in Kyoto, died.
1800 In Sweden Count Balthazar Von Platen started the Gut Canal.
1800 Many Bantu people from Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania were taken from their homes and sold as slaves in Somalia.
1800 In Germany Hymnen and Die Nacht by the poetFriedrich Leopold von Hardenberg, called Novalis (1772-1801). Probably the most romantic of all the Romantics, he symbolized their yearnings as the ‘blue flower.’ This poem expressed another German Romantic idea, the death wish.
1800 John Gilchrist in India, principal of the newly-founded college at Fort William, compiled the first Urdu grammar and dictionary. This made possible translation of foreign literature into Urdu.
1800 Coelina, ou L’Enfant de Mystere by Rene Charles Guilbert de Pixerecourt (1773-1844). He was the first writer to use the word ‘melodrama’ on its modern sense, in his manifesto Le Melodrama. Hw claimed to write for those who could not read, and his plays call for spectacular effects. His work was widely translated.
1800 The government of Burma laid down rules controlling the theatre, to ensure that live and puppet performances were respectful to the King and the Buddhist religion. In fact the theatre became a political force; a noted play, Wizaya by U Pon Nya, was written to incite support for a usurper.
1800 In Wales the revival of National Eisteddfod
1800 The Aeolodion, a keyed wind instrument, is said to have been invented by J.T. Eschenbach of Hamburg. It was subsequently modified by various other mechanicians and eventually superseded by the harmonium.
1800 Birth of Mikha’il ibn Jurjis al-lubnani Mushaqa in Arabia. Musical theorist and writer (d.1888), the most important modern Arabic writer on theory of music.
1800 Joseph Marie Jacquard invented a punch card loom.
1800 French silversmiths arriving after the French Revolution in Canada settled in Quebec which became an important centre of silversmithing: unlike the earlier Huguenot immigrants to America, they were Catholic and most of their work was ecclesiastical.
1800 Figurines in pottery were made at Radonezh, Russia, Viatka and Okhta: those from the last two centres were comedy and caricature figures.
1800 Life size statue group, the Twelve Prophets by Antonio Francisco Lisboa (1738-1814) in Brazil. Sculptor and architect he worked in rococo style and despite paralysis, was considered the most important sculptor in colonial Brazil.
1800 Magic lanterns were equipped with limelights in Europe Cylinders of lime heated by an oxyhydrogen flame.
1800 John Crome (1768-1821) painted his more important large pictures. He and Cotman were considered the major artists of the Norwich school of landscape painting. His pictures of Slade Quarries, Moonrise on the Marshes of Yare, Mousehold Heath and Poringland Oak showed a feeling for the spirit of place which foreshadowed he Romantics.
1800 Beginning of Josiah Spode II’s period of Spode’s Stoke-on-Trent porcelain factory; he finally formulated the bone china recipe (hard-paste porcelain modified by the addition of bone-ash)
1800 Development of gold, silver and copper lustre ware pottery in England
1800 Napoleon establishes himself as First Consul in the Tuileries
1800 French army defeats Austrians at Biberach and Hochstadt.
1800 French army advances on Vienna
1800 Napoleon’s army crosses the Great St. Bernard Pass
1800 British conquer Malta
1800 A plot to assassinate Napoleon discovered in Paris
1800 Thomas Morton: “Speed the Plough,” comedy in which for the first time a reference to the character Mrs. Grundy appears
1800 Jean Paul: “Titan,” a german novel
1800 Mme. de Stael: “On Literature”
1800 Napoleon appoints committee of jurists to draw up Civil Code
1800 Goya: “Portrait of a woman”
1800 Cardinal Barnaba Chiaramonti elected Pope Pius VII (-1823)
1800 Fichte: “Der geschlossene Handelsstant”
1800 Arnold Heeren: “European Political Systems”
1800 Schelling; “System des transzendentalen Idealismus”
1800 Church of United Brethern in Christ founded in the US
1800 Boieldieu: “Le Calife de Baagdad,” opera, Paris
1800 Cherubini: (“The Water Carrier”), opera, Paris
1800 Humphry Davy: “Researches, Chemical and Philosophical, Concerning Nitrous Oxide”
1800 German physician F.J. Hall (1758-1828) founds practice of phrenology
1800 Richard Trevithick constructs light pressure steam engine
1800 Eli Whitney makes muskets with interchangeable parts
1800 Grossglockner, in the Austrian Alps, first successfully scaled
1800 Letter post introduced in Berlin
1800 Ottawa founded
1800 Bill Richmond (1763-1829) a former Negro slave, becomes one of the first popular boxers
1800-1861 This period was covered by Nicholas E. Tawa in his 2000 book: “High-Minded and Low-Down: Music in the Lives of Americans, 1800-1861.”
1800-1900 Charles M. Russell, 19th century American landscape painter. In 2001 his painting “A Disputed Trail” sold for $2.4 million.
1800-1900 In the 1990s Claude Rawson wrote Vol. 4 of “The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism: The Eighteenth Century.”
1800-1900 In California floods turned the Central Valley into a lake 700 miles long.
1800-1900 Sir David Brewster, 19th cent. Scottish scientist, inventor of the kaleidoscope.
1800-1900 J.H. Salisbury was a 19th century English dietician who recommended a diet of ground steak for a variety of ailments including pernicious anemia, tuberculosis and hardening of the arteries. His name gave rise to “Salisbury steak.”
1800-1900 19th century Tokyo was called Edo and served as the shogun’s power seat.
1800-1900 In what later became Pakistan feudal families came to power when the British made weak vassals into a hereditary land-owning elite loyal to London.
1800-1900 In South Africa the Witwatersrand gold mines were discovered, the largest gold reserve find in the world. The gold came from a strip of land 62 miles long and 25 miles wide and produced three-fourths of all the gold ever mined.
1800-1900 The main river channel at Hoi An, Vietnam, shifted toward Danang and made navigation by deep-draft ships difficult, and thus lost its commercial importance. A new port was built on the Han River at Da Nang.

We also have our Giveaway taking place:

For the Giveaway, see our original blog post from Saturday

I finished the Lexicon for this go round, (Found a list of Nautical terms from the period buried in my files to add for the next go round) so time for a little celebration.

For those who missed it, there are a lot of previous posts here of all the letters and you can skip back and have a look.

For this post and running through the week, the winner to be picked on Monday the 5th, I will be giving away a free eBook copy of Jane Austen and Ghosts

PastedGraphic-2012-08-5-14-06.jpg

In the world of moviemaking, nothing is as golden as rebooting a classic tale that has made fortunes every time before when it has been adapted for the silver screen. Certainly any work by Jane Austen made into a movie will not only be bankable, but also considered a work of art.

That is of course until the current wave of adaptations that unite her classic stories with all the elements of the afterlife is attempted to be created. That these have found success in the marketplace amongst booklovers may not be quite understood by those who make movies. But that they are a success is understood and a reason to make them into movies.

All that being said, perhaps it would also be fair to say that the very proper Jane, were she present to have anything to say about it, would not be pleased. Of course she has been away from this Earth for nearly 200 hundred years. But does that mean were she upset enough, she wouldn’t come back?

How to win

But to enter the contest I should like 2 things. As Jane deals with old B Horror Movie legends in Jane Austen and Ghosts, I would like you to put in the comments section here:

1) The name of a B movie legend (and please let us try not to repeat since it will be fun to see how many we can come up with. So to start off, I will give one as an example, Boris Karloff)

2) One favorite word from the Lexicon which you can see each separate letter here in the Blog by looking at the previous days posts, or go to the entire lexicon at the Regency Assembly Press website, here (Regency Lexicon)

3) (Optional) Your name of course (if you are registered and signed into WordPress then I can click back to you if you are the winner, but if you are not,) and an email or some way to get you the prize!

4) (Optional) And if you are super proactive, what eBook format you would need should you be our winner!

Read Full Post »

Now that the Lexicon is finished for a time, I am back at work on the Timelines, which you can find house

TheRegencyEraTimeline-2012-07-30-10-54.jpg

And should you think that I have gone silent, such is not the case. I have about a third of 1800 finished, giving you a glimpse now of this:

1800 1800
Year Month Day Event
1800 Jan 7 Millard Fillmore, 13th US president (1850-1853), was born in Summerhill (Locke), N.Y.
1800 Jan 8 Victor of Aveyron (~1785-1828), a feral child, emerged from French forests on his own. In 1797 he had been found wandering the woods near Saint-Sernin-sur-Rance, France, and was captured, but soon escaped. He was later  portrayed in the 1969 movie, The Wild Child (L’Enfant sauvage), by François Truffaut.
1800 Jan 10 The US Senate ratified a peace treaty with Tunis.
1800 Jan 20 Carolina, the sister of Napoleon I, married King Joachim Murat of Naples.
1800 Jan 23 Edward Rutledge (50), US attorney (signed Declaration of Independence), died.
1800 Jan 24 Edwin Chadwick, British social reformer, was born.
1800 Jan 30 US population was reported at 5,308,483; Black population 1,002,037 (18.9%).
1800 Jan Pierre Samuel du Pont de Nemours, his two sons and their families, arrived in Newport, Rhode Island, from France.
1800 Jan Lord Elgin established his British embassy in Constantinople. His orders were to open the borders for trade, obtain entry for British ships to the Black Sea and to secure an alliance against French military expeditions in the eastern Mediterranean.
1800 Feb 11 William Henry Fox Talbot (d.1877), British inventor and pioneer in instantaneous photography, was born.
1800 Mar 14 James Bogardus, US inventor, builder (made cast-iron buildings), was born.
1800 Mar 17 English warship Queen Charlotte caught fire and 700 people died.
1800 Mar 20 French army defeated Turks at Heliopolis, Turkey, and advanced to Cairo.
1800 Apr 2 1st performance of Ludwig van Beethoven’s 1st Symphony in C.
1800 Apr 15 Sir James Clark Ross, Scottish explorer, was born. He located the Magnetic North Pole.
1800 Apr 16 George Charles Bingham, British soldier, was born. He commanded the Light Brigade during its famous charge.
1800 Apr 24 US Congress approved a bill establishing the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. with a $5,000 allocation.
1800 April April: Beethoven premiers his Symphony No. 1 in C major in Vienna.
1800 April April: English poet William Cowper dies at age 68 .
1800 May 5 Louis Hachette, French publisher (Librairie Hachette), was born.
1800 May 7 US Congress divided the Northwest Territory into two parts, and Indiana, the latter out of the western portion, including Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana and parts of Michigan and Minnesota. The provisions of the Treaty of Paris (1783) which ended the Revolutionary War, had defined the borders of the US. Among other concessions, Great Britain agreed to a line through the Great Lakes that placed in US control the territory called the Old Northwest, between the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. States that had previously laid claim to parts of the region ceded their territories in anticipation of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787.
1800 May 7 Niccolo  Piccinni (72), Italian composer (Roland), died.
1800 May 9 John Brown, American abolitionist, was born. His adventures came to an end at Harper’s Ferry, where he tried to start a revolution against slavery.
1800 May 14 Friedrich von Schiller’s “Macbeth,” premiered in Weimar
1800 May 15 King George III survived a 2nd assassination attempt.
1800 May 19 French Bosbeeck, veterinarian, robber, was hanged.
1800 May May: “The Masquerade given at the King’s Theatre, on the 1st instant, was numerously attended. Among the several characters, a Quack Doctor was most conspicuous – a Sylvester Daggerwood who had an infinite deal of nothing to say — Sailors, Countrymen, Chimney Sweepers, Flower Girls, Gipsies, a Tommy Tonsor, a band of Mrs. Montagu’s friends, a Rolla, who tore his fine speeches, full of logic and grammar, and a great number of Harlequins and Clowns, the former sans agility, the latter sans humor, filled up the scene. The supper was the best by far that has of late been given upon such an occasion, and the company was truly respectable. We cannot conclude this brief account without expressing our disapprobation of the indecent custom of men habiting themselves like women. The conduct of some persons of this description, during the evening, disgusted the greater part of the assembly; but at length some gentlemen, much to their credit, actually compelled them to retire from the merry scene.”- The Sporting Magazine
1800 May May: An assissination attempt is made on George III at Drury Lane Theatre.
1800 May May: Napoleon crosses the Alps and invades Italy.
1800 May-Dec US presidential elections were held over this period. On Dec 3 state electors met and cast their ballots and a tie resulted between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr.
1800 Jun 4 The US White House was completed and President & Mrs. John Adams moved in. [see Nov 1]
1800 Jun 14 French General Napoleon Bonaparte pushed the forces of Austria out of Italy in the Battle of Marengo. In 2007 the sword he wore was auctioned off for over $6.4 million.
1800 Jun 14 Jean-Baptiste Kleber (47), French general, architect, was murdered.
1800 June June: Napoleon drives the Austrians from Italy (which they had conquered while he was busy in Egypt) in the Battle of Marengo.
1800 June The new city of Washington in the District of Columbia became the US capital, succeeding Philadelphia. This occurred when government departments began to move into their new buildings on land ceded to the federal government by Maryland and Virginia. The radial design of the city was created by the French architect Pierre Charles L’Enfant. Construction had begun in 1791 but was delayed following L’Enfant’s dismissal in 1792. The first Congress to sit in Washington convened on Nov. 17, 1800. The first president to live in the executive mansion, John Adams moved in also in November. The first president to be inaugurated there, Thomas Jefferson was sworn into office March 4 1801. The US was the first modern nation to design a city exclusively as a capital.
1800 Jul 6 The Sultan of Constantinople at the behest of Lord Elgin issued written orders to his officers in Athens for cooperation with Giovanni Lusieri and the removal of sculptures from the Parthenon.
1800 Jul 8 Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse gave the 1st cowpox vaccination to his son to prevent smallpox. [see May 14, 1796]
1800 Aug 21 The US Marine Band gave its first concert near the future site of the Lincoln Memorial.
1800 Sep 6 Catherine Esther Beecher, educator who promoted higher education for women, was born in East Hampton, Long Island, NY.
1800 Sep 7 The NYC Zion AME Church was dedicated.
1800 Sep 23 William Holmes McGuffey, educator, was born. He is famous for his book “Eclectic Readers” (McGuffey Readers).
1800 September September: At the invitation of the Maltese, British troops liberate the Islands of Malta and Gozo from the French.
1800 September Cayuga Bridge, an engineering marvel of its time, was completed. It crossed the northern end of Cayuga Lake and the Montezuma Swamp in west central New York. The bridge, one and one-eighth of a mile long, was built of wood and was wide enough for wagons to pass abreast. Stages of the Genesee Turnpike used it, as did American troops in the War of 1812 on their way to the Niagara frontier. The bridge cot $150,000. It was financed by a loan from the Manhattan Company of New York City, which was founded in 1799 by Aaron Burr. Ostensibly established as a water supply company, the Manhattan Company had a charter broad enough so that it could function as a bank.
1800 Oct 1 Spain ceded Louisiana to France in a secret treaty.
1800 Oct 2 Nat Turner, slave and the property of Benjamin Turner, was born in Southampton county, Va. He was sold in 1831 to Joseph Travis from Jerusalem, Southampton county, Va.
1800 Oct 3 George Bancroft, historian, known as the “Father of American History” for his 10-volume A History of the United States, was born.
1800 Oct 7 Gabriel, slave revolt leader in Virginia, was hanged. Gabriel Prosser had mounted a slave rebellion.
1800 Oct 25 Thomas Babington Macaulay (d.1859), England, poet and historian, was born. “No particular man is necessary to the state. We may depend on it that, if we provide the country with popular institutions, those institutions will provide it with great men.”
1800 Oct 26 Helmuth Karl von Moltke, Prussian Field Marshal and Count, was born. His reorganization of the Prussian Army led to military victories that allowed the unification of Germany. His father was a German officer serving in the Danish army. His greatest innovation was the creation of a fighting force that could mobilize quickly and strike when and where it chose. He was one of the first generals to grasp the importance of railroads in moving troops. In 1995 Otto Friedrich authored a biography of the Moltke family line from Bismarck to Hitler: “Blood and Iron: From Bismarck to Hitler the von Moltke Family’s Impact on German History.”
1800 Nov 1 John and Abigail Adams moved into “the President’s House” in Washington DC. It became known as the White House during the Roosevelt administration.
1800 Nov 17 The Sixth Congress (2nd session) convened for the first time in Washington, DC, in the partially completed Capitol building. Previously, the federal capital had briefly been in  other cities, including New York, Philadelphia, and Annapolis, Maryland. George Washington- a surveyor by profession- had been assigned to find a site for a capital city somewhere along the upper Potomac River, which flows between Maryland and Virginia. Apparently expecting to become president, Washington sited the capital at the southernmost possible point, the closest commute from Mount Vernon, despite the fact that this placed the city in a swamp called Foggy Bottom.
1800 Nov 24 Weber’s opera “Das Waldmadchen,” premiered in Freiburg.
1800 Dec 2 John Brown (d.1859), US abolitionist, was born. He was hanged for murder in the Harper’s Ferry Incident in 1859. John Brown led the raid on the Federal Arsenal at Harper’s Ferry. The incident is the backdrop for George MacDonald Fraser’s novel “Flashman and the Angel of the Lord.”
1800 Dec 3 Austrians were defeated by the French at the Battle of Hohenlinden, near Munich.
1800 Dec 3 US state electors met and cast their ballots for the presidency. A tie resulted between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr.
1800 Dec 12 Washington DC was established as the capital of US.
1800 Dec 29 Charles Goodyear (d.1860), inventor of vulcanized rubber for tires, was born.
1800 Dec In Virginia Martha Washington set all her slaves free.
1800 December December: Peace negotiations between France and Austria break down, and Napoleon sends General Moreau into Austria, where he is victorious at the Battle of Hohenlinden.
1800 December December: Washington, DC is officially established as the capital of the United States.
1800 A new edition of Lyrical Ballads is published, with a Preface by William Wordsworth (expanded in the 1802 edition) that stands as a Romantic manifesto on the nature of poetry.
1800 Jacques Louis David paints his famous Portrait of Mme. Récamier.
1800 London’s Royal College of Surgeons is founded.
1800 Maria Edgeworth’s Castle Rackrent is published.
1800 In a secret treaty with Spain, the Treaty of San Ildefonso, France regains Louisiana. 
1800 England’s population, around 5.25 million in 1720, has increased to around 9 million. World population has risen from between 600 and 680 million in 1700 to one billion, roughly calculated. The most populous cities in 1800 are: Guangzhou, China: 1.5 million.
Hangchow, China: 1,000,000
Kingtehchen, China: 1,000,000 
NanJing, China: 1,000,000
Edo (Tokyo), Japan 1,000,000 
London, England: 865,000
Beijing, China: 700,000
Constantinople (Istanbul), Turkey: 598,000
Paris, France: 548,000
Kyoto, Japan:530,000
1800 Mexico City has a population of 250,000. New York City: 60,000. Population remains sparse in areas occupied by hunter-gatherers — in Africa and the plains of North America. Areas occupied by pastoral nomads are also sparse.
1800 In the US presidential elections Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr tied in electoral votes. The selection was then moved to the House of Representatives where on the 36th ballot Vermont and Maryland switch their votes to Jefferson. [see Feb 17, 1801]
1800 France Presern (d.1849), author, painter, poet, musician, mathematician and architect, was born in Slovenia. His image was later featured on Slovenia’s 1,000-tolar bills.
1800 Johann Christian Reinhart, German artist, created his work: “The History Painter, Caricature.”
1800 Friedrich Schiller wrote his drama “Mary Stuart.” The play is compressed into the last 3 days of Mary’s life.
1800 Rev. Mason L. Weems (d.1825) authored the biography “Life of Washington.”
1800 Father Demetrius Gallitzin (1770-1840), a Russian-born Catholic priest, was directed by bishop John Carroll to investigate spirits in the home (Wizard’s Clip) of Adam Livingstone in the Shenandoah Valley.
1800 Congress allocated a room in the Capitol for the US Supreme Court.
1800 The American political “revolution” brought the Republicans to office in the (sic) first peaceful transition of power between rival political parties in human history.
1800 Worcestershire sauce was a ketchup and came out about this time.
1800 Jean Baptiste Pointe du Sable, a pioneer trader and founder of the village that became Chicago, sold his holdings and moved to a Missouri farm.
1800 The population of the world doubled from what it was in 1500 to more than 800 million. The world’s population reached about 1 billion about this time. In 1927 it reached 2 billion; in 1959 3 billion; in 1987 5 billion; in 1999 6 billion and in 2011 7 billion.
1800 William Herschel (1738-1822), German-born English astronomer, detected what later became known as infra-red red light in experiments with glass prisms and thermometers.
1800 Alessandro Volta (1745-1827), Italian physicist, first demonstrated the electric pile or battery.
1800 Robert Fulton (35) tested a 20-foot model of his torpedo-armed submarine on the Seine. He made two 20-minute dives himself.
1800 John Chapman (1774-1845), Johnny Appleseed, a Swedenborgian missionary, a land speculator, a heavy drinker and an eccentric dresser, began planting orchards across western Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana from seed. (T&L, 10/1980, p.42) )(AHD, p.225)(HNQ, 1/2/01)
1800 Lieven Bauwens stole a spinning “mule jenny” machine from Britain. He had it dismantled and smuggled out in a cargo of coffee. This enabled the textile industry in Ghent, Belgium, to greatly expand. Britain sentenced Bauwens to death in absentia and Ghent made him a hero.
1800 Mary Robinson (42/43), writer, actress, courtesan and fashion icon, died. In 2005 Sarah Gristwood authored “Perdita: Royal Mistress, Writer and Romantic.” Paula Byrne authored Perdita: The Literary, Theatrical, Scandalous Life of Mary Robinson.”
1800 The Parliament in Westminster passed an Act of Union formally binding Ireland with England and abolished the Irish parliament. The Act of Union entailed the loss of legislative independence of the Irish Parliament.
1800 The French regained the territory of Louisiana from Spain by the secret Treaty of Ildefenso.
1800 Dessalines, a lieutenant of Haitian rebel leader Toussaint L’Ouverture (Louverture),  butchered many mulattoes (the estimates range from 200 to 10,000).
1800 The Althing of Iceland was abolished by the Danish king.
1800 About this time an Arab nomadic tribe settled in the southern Israeli desert of Negev. The Al-Sayyid community that developed there grew with a high incidence of profound deafness due to a recessive gene. The village developed a sign language in response that came to be called the Al-Sayyid Bedouin Sign Language (ABSL). In 2007 Margalit Fox authored “Signs and Wonders,” which told the Al-Sayyid story as part of a history of linguistics and sign language in American and the world.
1800 Ito Jakuchu (b.1716), Japanese painter based in Kyoto, died.
1800 In Sweden Count Balthazar Von Platen started the Gut Canal.
1800 Many Bantu people from Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania were taken from their homes and sold as slaves in Somalia.
1800-1861 This period was covered by Nicholas E. Tawa in his 2000 book: “High-Minded and Low-Down: Music in the Lives of Americans, 1800-1861.”
1800-1900 Charles M. Russell, 19th century American landscape painter. In 2001 his painting “A Disputed Trail” sold for $2.4 million.
1800-1900 In the 1990s Claude Rawson wrote Vol. 4 of “The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism: The Eighteenth Century.”
1800-1900 In California floods turned the Central Valley into a lake 700 miles long.
1800-1900 Sir David Brewster, 19th cent. Scottish scientist, inventor of the kaleidoscope.
1800-1900 J.H. Salisbury was a 19th century English dietician who recommended a diet of ground steak for a variety of ailments including pernicious anemia, tuberculosis and hardening of the arteries. His name gave rise to “Salisbury steak.”
1800-1900 19th century Tokyo was called Edo and served as the shogun’s power seat.
1800-1900 In what later became Pakistan feudal families came to power when the British made weak vassals into a hereditary land-owning elite loyal to London.
1800-1900 In South Africa the Witwatersrand gold mines were discovered, the largest gold reserve find in the world. The gold came from a strip of land 62 miles long and 25 miles wide and produced three-fourths of all the gold ever mined.
1800-1900 The main river channel at Hoi An, Vietnam, shifted toward Danang and made navigation by deep-draft ships difficult, and thus lost its commercial importance. A new port was built on the Han River at Da Nang.

We also have our Giveaway taking place:

For the Giveaway, see our original blog post from Saturday

I finished the Lexicon for this go round, (Found a list of Nautical terms from the period buried in my files to add for the next go round) so time for a little celebration.

For those who missed it, there are a lot of previous posts here of all the letters and you can skip back and have a look.

For this post and running through the week, the winner to be picked on Monday the 5th, I will be giving away a free eBook copy of Jane Austen and Ghosts

PastedGraphic-2012-07-30-10-54.jpg

In the world of moviemaking, nothing is as golden as rebooting a classic tale that has made fortunes every time before when it has been adapted for the silver screen. Certainly any work by Jane Austen made into a movie will not only be bankable, but also considered a work of art.

That is of course until the current wave of adaptations that unite her classic stories with all the elements of the afterlife is attempted to be created. That these have found success in the marketplace amongst booklovers may not be quite understood by those who make movies. But that they are a success is understood and a reason to make them into movies.

All that being said, perhaps it would also be fair to say that the very proper Jane, were she present to have anything to say about it, would not be pleased. Of course she has been away from this Earth for nearly 200 hundred years. But does that mean were she upset enough, she wouldn’t come back?

How to win

But to enter the contest I should like 2 things. As Jane deals with old B Horror Movie legends in Jane Austen and Ghosts, I would like you to put in the comments section here:

1) The name of a B movie legend (and please let us try not to repeat since it will be fun to see how many we can come up with. So to start off, I will give one as an example, Boris Karloff)

2) One favorite word from the Lexicon which you can see each separate letter here in the Blog by looking at the previous days posts, or go to the entire lexicon at the Regency Assembly Press website, here (Regency Lexicon)

3) (Optional) Your name of course (if you are registered and signed into WordPress then I can click back to you if you are the winner, but if you are not,) and an email or some way to get you the prize!

4) (Optional) And if you are super proactive, what eBook format you would need should you be our winner!

Read Full Post »