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Archive for June, 2014

The Prize is Not as Great as You Think-A Ruritanian Romance

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Here collected on one page are links to the blog posts that serialized the first half of The Prize is Not As Great As You Think. That has been my working title and it is possible that before all is done, something different will suggest itself. Something shorter.

As mentioned it is a Ruritanian Romance. I can’t remember just now how the idea came to me, but then after it did I started to research, and reread such works as Edgar Rice Burroughs 240px-E-R-Burroughs-2012-10-10-07-55-2012-10-31-10-59-2013-01-16-09-12-2014-06-26-05-30.jpg the, The Mad King The_Mad_King-2012-10-10-07-55-2012-10-31-10-59-2013-01-16-09-12-2014-06-26-05-30.jpg as well as the The Prisoner of Zenda 51RcgGgZclL._BO2252C204252C203252C200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click252CTopRight252C35252C-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.yqqGlLNydzRb-2012-10-10-07-55-2012-10-31-10-59-2013-01-16-09-12-2014-06-26-05-30.jpg to prep for writing my tale.

To prep you, the tale deals with events in the Grand Duchy of Almondy, as I describe:

‘bordered the north of Switzerland. To the east was France and now Belgium. The Germanies to the west, and finally the Netherlands to its north. Almondy was landlocked.’

One of the characteristics of a good Ruritanian Romance is intrigue. And as you can tell from the position of the country, the buffer between Germany and France, there certainly will be opportunity for it. With such neighbors, and set 836 years after the conquest. The conquest that took place the same year the William invaded England and defeated Harold. The year of our story begins in 1902, September.

A period of time when the Great War is brewing.

I also have a mailing list just for The Prize and can keep you informed of new chapters being released prior to publication as well as provide you with mail when this goes live as a Kickstarter.

Click on the Mail Chimp button to be taken through to our email list signup.

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Chapter One can be found either at our website:

iWeb-2012-10-10-07-55-2012-10-31-10-59-2013-01-16-09-12-2014-06-26-05-30.jpg

Or here on the blog

RuritanianRomance_SerializingachapteratatimeChapter1TheThingsThatCatchMyEye-2012-10-10-07-55-2012-10-31-10-59-2013-01-16-09-12-2014-06-26-05-30.jpg

Or at our Wattpad site: The_Prize_is_Not_Always_as_Great_as_One_Thinks_-_Wattpad-2014-06-26-05-30.jpg
All our Chapters:
Chapter One
Chapter Two
Chapter Three
Chapter Four
Chapter Five
Chapter Six
Chapter Seven
Chapter Eight
Chapter Nine

Please join us on Facebook should you choose to

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A Trolling We Will Go

Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but I also have delved into Fantasy.

The Trolling series, (the first three are in print) is the story of a man, Humphrey. We meet him as he has left youth and become a man with a man’s responsibilities. We follow him in a series of stories that encompass the stages of life.

We see him when he starts his family, when he has older sons and the father son dynamic is tested. We see him when his children begin to marry and have children, and at the end of his life when those he has loved, and those who were his friends proceed him over the threshold into death.

All this while he serves a kingdom troubled by monsters. Troubles that he and his friends will learn to deal with and rectify.

It is now available in a variety of formats. For $.99 you can get this fantasy adventure.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

Amazon for your Kindle

The Valley Kingdom of Torahn had been at peace for fifty years since the Council of Twenty-One saw fit to dispense with their royal family.

The only Kingdom without a King on the west side of the continent. But late last year, something caused the Goblins in the Old Forest, Karasbahn to stir and act courageous.

Something that men can not remember seeing Goblins ever doing. What has gotten the Goblins in such a state?

Whatever it is, it can not be good news for Torahn. Or for Humphrey, a woodcutter for a small town, far from Karasbahn.

But part of the Kingdom’s militia, with no family or other exemptions. He is perfect to be sent to the Old Forest and find out what scares the Goblins that they have become fearless.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Lord Charles FitzRoy
28 February 1791 – 13 June 1865

Fitzroy was a British soldier and Whig politician. He fought at the Battle of Waterloo at an early age and later held political office as Vice-Chamberlain of the Household between 1835 and 1838.

Fitzroy was the second son of George FitzRoy, 4th Duke of Grafton, and his wife Lady Charlotte Maria Waldegrave, daughter of James Waldegrave, 2nd Earl Waldegrave. Henry FitzRoy, 5th Duke of Grafton, was his elder brother.

FitzRoy joined the army and served in the Peninsular War. He was a captain in the 1st Foot Guards and fought in the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. He eventually reached the rank of lieutenant-colonel.

FitzRoy was elected as a Member of Parliament (MP) for Thetford at the 1818 general election, and held the seat until the 1830 general election, which he did not contest. He returned to Commons the following year, when he was elected at the 1831 general election as MP for Bury St Edmunds. He held the seat until 1847, when he did not stand again. When the Whigs came to power under Lord Melbournein 1835, FitzRoy was sworn of the Privy Council and appointed Vice-Chamberlain of the Household, a post he held until 1838.

FItzroy married Lady Anne Cavendish, daughter of George Cavendish, 1st Earl of Burlington and Lady Elizabeth Compton, on 25 October 1825. They had one son and a daughter. He died in June 1865, aged 74. Lady Charles FitzRoy died in May 1871, aged 83

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Are you an Artist?

Now editing the final draft of another of our romance stories, we have started to lean to the idea that perhaps a professional artist might be better than our own renditions. Someone who can bring out the details and bring our stories alive.
If anyone knows of someone who would like to discuss designing a cover for RAP or the interiors (we think that a facing illustration at the start of every chapter like in the early part of the last century would be splendid), please get in contact with us.
In the immediate future we plan to launch a Kickstarter and wish to contract out the cover art and interior illustrations. Should we be funded in this project, you will be paid for your work immediately.
Our many works, one of the things we would like to see is having pen & ink or pencil illustrations at the beginning of each chapter. Can you draw like CE Brock? He did amazing work for the books and stories of Jane Austen in the early 1900s.

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The Rules for Writers

Those who follow me for a long time know that I also write in other fields aside from Regency Romance and the historical novels I do.

A few months ago, before the end of last year and 2011 NaNoWriMo, (where I wrote the first draft of another Regency) I started work on a project about writing.

The premise was what one should think about when starting and working on a project. I came up with 10 rules to follow in a quest to become a writer and tackle that novel.

Here are The 10 Rules:
1) Read like a writer
2) Have a good story
3) Your work will be Thematic
4) Plot: The seven deadly ones
5) Characters will carry your tale, near and far
6) Words are your warriors
7) Stories are structured
8) All tales building to a Crescendo
9) Genghis edits history, shouldn’t you as well
10) Act like a writer

So it is now released. For $4.99 you can get this treatise on honing your skills.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

Amazon for your Kindle

Genghis Khan came from the Steppes of Mongolia, a family torn apart by neighboring tribes, to unite those tribes, or defeat them, and then conquer the greater part of the known world. His heirs would continue his conquest right to the edge of western society. The world feared the Mongols, and Genghis. Now, you can benefit, as a writer from the lessons he has to impart on how, with the changing world of publishing, you can perfect your work and write not only good material for this new age of book publishing. But can write great work for this new age. 10 simple lessons, and you will be on your way to conquering the bookshelves of the 21st century. This short book will have you learning all you really need to know to elevate your writing to the next level. These simple lessons will start you on the road to better writing as a member of the Horde in no time.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Sir Edward Thomas ffrench Bromhead
26 March 1789 – 14 March 1855

Edward Bromhead was a British landowner and mathematician best remembered as patron of the mathematician and physicist George Green.

Born into a landed family in Lincolnshire, Bromhead was educated at the University of Glasgow and later at Caius College, Cambridge before taking up the study of law at the Inner Temple in London. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1817. Returning to Lincolnshire, he became High Steward of Lincoln.

While at Cambridge, Bromhead was a founder of the Analytical Society, a precursor of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, together with John Herschel, George Peacock and Charles Babbage, with whom he maintained a close and lifelong friendship. While he was, by all accounts, a gifted mathematician in his own right (although ill-health prevented him from pursuing his studies further), his greatest contribution to the subject is at second hand: having subscribed to the first publication of self-taught mathematician and physicist George Green, he encouraged Green to continue his research and to write further papers (which Bromhead sent on to be published in the Transactions of the Cambridge Philosophical Society and those of the Royal Society of Edinburgh)

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Be a First Reader
A few months ago we released Beggars Can’t Be Choosier BeggarsCover-2014-06-24-05-30.jpg which has found critical acclaim, winning a literary award.
Regency Assembly Press’s next Regency project will be Caution’s Heir.

In this tale of the Regency, our hero is making ends meet and restoring the family fortunes at the card tables. Never overindulging the matter, but bringing in enough to live on.

His father, is aging and slightly ill staying in the Country. To the tables at the club comes a man who has just inherited all from his brother, a Marquess, including the title.

The new Marquess, not thinking that he would ever be so fortunate, he is ill prepared for this, and has been somewhat of a fool when it comes to wealth. He gambles all his estates, and all within.

Then flees to the former Colonies to reestablish himself and perhaps find a fortune, now that he has lost all. Forgetting that within his home is his only child, a daughter who was making plans to come out for the Season.

And now she, taking all the courage she can muster, arrives at the doorstep of the man who won all from her father.

This tale is in need of those who will be able to cast a critical eye, as RAP has sought you, our readers, input before. Should you be inclined to get an early copy and have a look for errors, omissions and aid in making this a solid read for others to enjoy, your efforts will be greatly appreciated.
I should note that I have found that not everyone who reads my style, hears my writers voice, likes the way I tell a story, while many others ‘get’ me. And they do enjoy my style and voice. Just as there are writers who I don’t like and can’t get past the first five pages of their material. As you read this post you may want to take that into account and look at some of the free samples of my writing that are available, or purchase a book first.
The mission is to check that the story is on the right path with plotting, with character development.
The job is to read the draft and provide criticism (you can be brutal like that character would never do that! or you forgot, they didn’t say things like that until forty years later.) Oops… If you see glaring word misuse Then/Than and can correct it that would be appreciated as well. And to do this in a timely manner.
What you get for this service. A signed copy of the book when released. Your name in the acknowledgements and should we start selling 1000+ copies of each book, real money. Anyone interested, please don’t hesitate to get in touch!

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covers-banner-2012-11-4-08-40-2012-12-1-07-54-2013-06-29-06-00-2014-06-24-05-30.jpg     http://www.regencyassemblypress.com/  

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A Trolling We Will Go Omnibus:The Latter Years

Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but I also have delved into Fantasy.

The Trolling series, is the story of a man, Humphrey. We meet him as he has left youth and become a man with a man’s responsibilities. He is a woodcutter for a small village. It is a living, but it is not necessarily a great living. It does give him strength, muscles.

We follow him in a series of stories that encompass the stages of life. We see him when he starts his family, when he has older sons and the father son dynamic is tested.

We see him when his children begin to marry and have children, and at the end of his life when those he has loved, and those who were his friends proceed him over the threshold into death.

All this while he serves a kingdom troubled by monsters. Troubles that he and his friends will learn to deal with and rectify.

Here are the last two books together as one longer novel.

Trolling, Trolling, Trolling Fly Hides! and We’ll All Go a Trolling.

Available in a variety of formats.

For $5.99 you can get this fantasy adventure.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

Amazon for your Kindle

Trade Paperback

The stories of Humphrey and Gwendolyn. Published separately in: Trolling, Trolling, Trolling Fly Hides! and We’ll All Go a Trolling. These are the tales of how a simple Woodcutter who became a king and an overly educated girl who became his queen helped save the kingdom of Torahn from an ancient evil. Now with the aid of their children and their grandchildren.

Long forgotten is the way to fight the Trolls. Beasts that breed faster than rabbits it seems, and when they decide to migrate to the lands of humans, their seeming invulnerability spell doom for all in the kingdom of Torahn. Not only Torahn but all the human kingdoms that border the great mountains that divide the continent.

The Kingdom of Torahn has settled down to peace, but the many years of war to acheive that peace has seen to changes in the nearby Teantellen Mountains. Always when you think the Trolls have also sought peace, you are fooled for now, forced by Dragons at the highest peaks, the Trolls are marching again.

Now Humphrey is old, too old to lead and must pass these cares to his sons. Will they be as able as he always has been. He can advise, but he does not have the strength he used to have. Nor does Gwendolyn back in the Capital. Here are tales of how leaders we know and are familiar with must learn to trust the next generation to come.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Henry Maudslay
22 August 1771 – 14 February 1831

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Henry Maudslay

Maudslay’s father, also named Henry, served as a wheelwright in the Royal Engineers. After being wounded in action he became a storekeeper at the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich, London. There he married a young widow, Margaret Laundy and they had seven children, among which young Henry was the fifth. Henry’s father died in 1780. Like many boys of his era, Henry began his work in manufacturing quite young; by the age of 12, he was a “powder monkey”, one of the boys employed in filling cartridges at the Arsenal. After two years, he was transferred to a carpenter’s shop followed by a blacksmith’s forge, where at the age of fifteen he began training as a blacksmith. He seems to have specialised in the lighter, more complex kind of forge work. During his time at the Arsenal Maudslay also worked at the Royal Foundry where Jan Verbruggen had installed an innovative Horizontal Boring Machine in 1772.

Maudslay acquired such a good reputation for his skill that Joseph Bramah called for his services. Bramah had recently designed and patented an improved type of lock based on the tumbler principle, but was having difficulty manufacturing the complex lock at an economic price. Having sent for Maudslay on the recommendation of one of his employees, Bramah was surprised to discover that he was only eighteen, but Maudslay demonstrated his ability and started work at Bramah’s workshop in Denmark Street, St Giles. It was Maudslay who built the lock that was displayed in Bramah’s shop window with a notice offering a reward of 200 guineas to anyone who could pick it. It resisted all efforts for forty-seven years. Maudslay designed and made a set of special tools and machines that allowed the lock to be made at an economic price.

Bramah had designed a hydraulic press, but was having problems sealing both the piston and the piston rod where it fitted into the cylinder. The usual method was hemp packing but the pressures were too high for this to work. Maudslay came up with the idea of a leather cup washer, which gave a perfect seal but offered no resistance to movement when the pressure was released. The new hydraulic press worked perfectly thereafter. But Maudslay, who had made a major contribution to its success, received little credit for it.

At the time when Maudslay began working for Bramah, the typical lathe was worked by a treadle and the workman held the cutting tool against the work. This did not allow for precision, especially in cutting iron. Maudslay designed a tool holder into which the cutting tool would be clamped, and which would slide on accurately planed surfaces to allow the cutting tool to move in either direction. The slide rest was positioned by a leadscrew to which power was transmitted through a pair of changeable gears so that it traveled in proportion to the turning of the work. This allowed screw threads to be precisely cut. Changing the gears gave various pitches. The ability of Maudslay’s slide-rest lathe to produce precision parts revolutionised the production of machine components.

A misunderstanding persisted for many years that James Nasmyth had claimed that Maudslay was the original inventor of the slide rest. By the mid-20th century informed historians understood that Maudslay was not the first person ever to build a slide rest, or to use one on a lathe. But he was in fact the person who combined the slide rest, leadscrew, and change gears in a precision machine, which popularized the concept and caused modern industry to widely adopt it.

Maudslay’s original screw-cutting lathe is at the Science Museum in London.

Maudslay had shown himself to be so talented that after one year the nineteen year old was made manager of Bramah’s workshop. In 1791 he married Bramah’s housemaid, Sarah Tindel. The couple were to have four sons together. Thomas Henry, the eldest, and Joseph, the youngest, subsequently joined their father in business. William, the second, became a civil engineer and was one of the founders of the Institution of Civil Engineers.

In 1797, after having worked for Bramah for eight years, Maudslay asked for an increase in his wage of only 30s a week. Bramah refused his request. This refusal determined Maudslay to set up business on his own account.

Maudslay obtained a small shop and smithy in Wells Street, off Oxford Street. In 1800 he moved to larger premises in Margaret Street, Cavendish Square.

Following earlier work by Samuel Bentham, his first major commission was to build a series of 42 woodworking machines to produce wooden rigging blocks (each ship required thousands) for the Navy under Sir Marc Isambard Brunel. The machines were installed in the purpose-built Portsmouth Block Mills, which still survive, including some of the original machinery. The machines were capable of making 130,000 ships’ blocks a year, needing only ten unskilled men to operate them compared with the 110 skilled workers needed before their installation. This was the first well-known example of specialized machinery used for machining in an assembly-line type factory.

Maudslay also developed the first industrially practical screw-cutting lathe in 1800, allowing standardisation of screw thread sizes for the first time. This allowed the concept of interchangeability (an idea that was already taking hold) to be practically applied to nuts and bolts. Before this, screw threads were usually made by chipping and filing (that is, with skilled freehand use of chisels and files). Nuts were rare; metal screws, when made at all, were usually for use in wood. Metal bolts passing through wood framing to a metal fastening on the other side were usually fastened in non-threaded ways (such as clinching or upsetting against a washer). Maudslay standardized the screw threads used in his workshop and produced sets of taps and dies that would make nuts and bolts consistently to those standards, so that any bolt of the appropriate size would fit any nut of the same size. This was a major advance in workshop technology.

Although Maudslay was not the first person to invent a slide-rest (as many writers have claimed), and may not have been the first inventor to combine a lead screw, slide-rest, and set of change gears all on one lathe (Jesse Ramsden may have done that in 1775; evidence is scant), he is certainly the person who introduced to the rest of the world the winning three-part combination of lead screw, slide rest, and change gears, sparking a great advance in machine tools and in the engineering use of screw threads.

Maudslay invented the first bench micrometer capable of measuring to one ten-thousandth of an inch (0.0001 in ≈ 3 µm). He called it the “Lord Chancellor”, as it was used to settle any questions regarding accuracy of workmanship.

By 1810 Maudslay was employing eighty workers and running out of room at his workshop, so he moved to larger premises in Westminster Bridge Road, Lambeth. Maudslay also recruited a promising young Admiralty draughtsman, Joshua Field, who proved to be so talented that Maudslay took him into partnership. The company later became Maudslay, Sons & Field when Maudslay’s sons became partners.

Maudslay’s Lambeth works began to specialize in the production of marine steam engines. The type of engine he used for ships was a side-lever design, in which a beam was mounted alongside the cylinder. This saved on height in the cramped engine rooms of steamers. His first marine engine was built in 1815, of 17 h.p., and fitted to a Thames steamer named the Richmond. In 1823 a Maudslay engine powered the Lightning, the first steam-powered vessel to be commissioned by the Royal Navy. In 1829 a side-lever engine of 400 h.p. completed for HMS Dee was the largest marine engine existing at that time.

In 1825 Marc Isambard Brunel began work on the Thames Tunnel, intended to link Rotherhithe with Wapping. After many difficulties this first tunnel under the Thames was successfully completed in 1842. The tunnel would not have been possible without the innovative tunneling shield designed by Marc Brunel and built by Maudslay Sons & Field at their Lambeth works. Maudslay also supplied the steam-driven pumps that were so important for keeping the tunnel workings dry.

Near the end of his life Maudslay developed an interest in astronomy and began to construct a telescope. He intended to buy a house in Norwood and build a private observatory there, but died before he was able to accomplish his plan. In January 1831 he caught a chill while crossing the English Channel after visiting a friend in France. He was ill for four weeks and died on 14 February 1831. He was buried in the churchyard of St Mary Magdalen Woolwich; he designed the memorial located in its Lady Chapel.

Many outstanding engineers trained in his workshop, including Richard Roberts, David Napier, Joseph Clement, Sir Joseph Whitworth, James Nasmyth (inventor of the steam hammer), Joshua Field and William Muir.

Henry Maudslay played his part in the development of mechanical engineering when it was in its infancy, but he was especially pioneering in the development of machine tools to be used in engineering workshops across the world.

Maudslay’s company was one of the most important British engineering manufactories of the nineteenth century, finally closing in 1904.

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The Prize is Not as Great as You Think-A Ruritanian Romance

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Here collected on one page are links to the blog posts that serialized the first half of The Prize is Not As Great As You Think. That has been my working title and it is possible that before all is done, something different will suggest itself. Something shorter.

As mentioned it is a Ruritanian Romance. I can’t remember just now how the idea came to me, but then after it did I started to research, and reread such works as Edgar Rice Burroughs 240px-E-R-Burroughs-2012-10-10-07-55-2012-10-31-10-59-2013-01-16-09-12-2014-06-23-05-30.jpg the, The Mad King The_Mad_King-2012-10-10-07-55-2012-10-31-10-59-2013-01-16-09-12-2014-06-23-05-30.jpg as well as the The Prisoner of Zenda 51RcgGgZclL._BO2252C204252C203252C200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click252CTopRight252C35252C-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.yqqGlLNydzRb-2012-10-10-07-55-2012-10-31-10-59-2013-01-16-09-12-2014-06-23-05-30.jpg to prep for writing my tale.

To prep you, the tale deals with events in the Grand Duchy of Almondy, as I describe:

‘bordered the north of Switzerland. To the east was France and now Belgium. The Germanies to the west, and finally the Netherlands to its north. Almondy was landlocked.’

One of the characteristics of a good Ruritanian Romance is intrigue. And as you can tell from the position of the country, the buffer between Germany and France, there certainly will be opportunity for it. With such neighbors, and set 836 years after the conquest. The conquest that took place the same year the William invaded England and defeated Harold. The year of our story begins in 1902, September.

A period of time when the Great War is brewing.

I also have a mailing list just for The Prize and can keep you informed of new chapters being released prior to publication as well as provide you with mail when this goes live as a Kickstarter.

Click on the Mail Chimp button to be taken through to our email list signup.

1__%252524%252521%252540%252521__PastedGraphic-2014-06-23-05-30.png

Chapter One can be found either at our website:

iWeb-2012-10-10-07-55-2012-10-31-10-59-2013-01-16-09-12-2014-06-23-05-30.jpg

Or here on the blog

RuritanianRomance_SerializingachapteratatimeChapter1TheThingsThatCatchMyEye-2012-10-10-07-55-2012-10-31-10-59-2013-01-16-09-12-2014-06-23-05-30.jpg

Or at our Wattpad site: The_Prize_is_Not_Always_as_Great_as_One_Thinks_-_Wattpad-2014-06-23-05-30.jpg
All our Chapters:
Chapter One
Chapter Two
Chapter Three
Chapter Four
Chapter Five
Chapter Six
Chapter Seven
Chapter Eight
Chapter Nine

Please join us on Facebook should you choose to

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