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Archive for September, 2013

I advertise this on Saturdays so some may have seen this before.

I should note that I have found that not everyone who reads my style, hears my writers voice, likes the way I tell a story, while many others ‘get’ me. And they do enjoy my style and voice. Just as there are writers who I don’t like and can’t get past the first five pages of their material. As you read this post you may want to take that into account and look at some of the free samples of my writing that are available, or purchase a book first.

At this point in my writing career, I think, though of course I can’t say for certain, that I have a few fans.

We may be able to count them on the fingers of one hand, but I hope there are more of you out there.

One thing though that I suffer from at this stage, is feedback.

I have 2 writing groups that I attend and we discuss the big issues in writing and critique some of what I have produced, but they do not meet often enough to work through an entire book as fast as I write them.

So, I am looking for someone, or someones who might like to help with the process.

To read my first drafts and check that I am on the right path with my plotting, my character development.

What this means is that I shall include the person(s) who wish to be a part of the process in my thinking and they can help to craft where the story goes.

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The job is to read the draft when I have finished with it, and provide criticism (you can be brutal like that character would never do that! or you forgot David, they didn’t say things like that until forty years later.) Oops… If you see glaring word misuse Then/Than and can correct it that would be appreciated as well, but not totally part of the job description. And to do this in a timely manner.

That last part is because I have hit up close friends to do this. They have volunteered (I placed an open Facebook request) and then I sit, and I wait, and I am reluctant to twist the arms of friends into if they have actually read the files I sent them. So timeliness is important, else I am stumped for moving on to the second draft and the continued editing process so we can release the book for more to read

What you get for this service. A signed copy of the book when released. Your name in the acknowledgements and should we start selling 1000+ copies of each book, real money. (Should we start selling 3000 copies of each book, I’ll place a post for hiring a real copy editor.)

That’s what I got for now. Anyone interested, please don’t hesitate to get in touch!

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables. The list of Previous Notables and Upcoming Entries has grown so long that I will post this once a week on Saturdays now.

Previous Notables (Click to see the Blog):

George III George IV Georgiana Cavendish
William IV Lady Hester Stanhope Lady Caroline Lamb
Princess Charlotte Queen Charlotte Charles James Fox
Queen Adelaide Dorothea Jordan Jane Austen
Maria Fitzherbert Lord Byron John Keats
Princess Caroline Percy Bysshe Shelley Cassandra Austen
Edmund Kean Thomas Clarkson Sir John Moore
John Burgoyne William Wilberforce Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Sarah Siddons Josiah Wedgwood Emma Hamilton
Hannah More John Phillip Kemble John Jervis, Earl St. Vincent
Ann Hatton Stephen Kemble Mary Robinson
Harriet Mellon Zachary Macaulay George Elphinstone
Thomas Babington George Romney Mary Moser
Ozias Humphry William Hayley Daniel Mendoza
Edward Pellew Angelica Kauffman Sir William Hamilton
David Garrick Pownoll Bastard Pellew Charles Arbuthnot
William Upcott William Huskisson Dominic Serres
Sir George Barlow Scrope Davies Charles Francis Greville
George Stubbs Fanny Kemble Thomas Warton
William Mason Thomas Troubridge Charles Stanhope
Robert Fulke Greville Gentleman John Jackson Ann Radcliffe
Edward ‘Golden Ball’ Hughes John Opie Adam Walker
John Ireland Henry Pierrepoint Robert Stephenson
Mary Shelley Sir Joshua Reynolds Francis Place
Richard Harding Evans Lord Thomas Foley Francis Burdett
John Gale Jones George Parker Bidder Sir George Warren
Edward Eliot William Beechey Eva Marie Veigel
Hugh Percy-Northumberland Charles Philip Yorke Lord Palmerston
Samuel Romilly John Petty 2nd Marquess Lansdowne Henry Herbert Southey
Stapleton Cotton Colin Macaulay Amelia Opie
Sir James Hall Henry Thomas Colebrooke Maria Foote
Sir David Baird Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville Dr. Robert Gooch
William Baillie James Northcote Horatio Nelson
Henry Fuseli Home Riggs Popham John Playfair
Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice 3rd Marquess Lansdowne Thomas Douglas 5th Earl of Selkirk Frederick Gerald “Poodle” Byng
Henry Somerset, 7th Duke of Beaufort John Wolcot (Peter Pindar) Joseph John Gurney
Edward John Eliot Henry Perronet Briggs George Lionel Dawson-Damer
Thomas Foley Mark Robinson Charles Culling Smith
Francis Charles Seymour-Ingram, 3rd Marquess of Hertford Thomas Fowell Buxton Tyrone Power
Richard Cumberland William Philip Molyneux, 2nd Earl of Sefton Edward Law, 1st Baron Ellenborough
Jeffry Wyattville Henry Mildmay Nicholas Wood
Hester Thrale Catherine Hughes, Baroness de Calabrella Admiral Israel Pellew
William Wellesley Pole, 3rd Earl of Mornington Henry Moyes Charles Fitzroy
Lord Granville Somerset Lumley St. George Skeffington William Playfair
John Lade Astley Cooper Matthew Gregory Lewis
Edward Pease Thomas Coutts John Urpeth Rastrick
Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond Captain William Baillie John Pitt Kennedy
Henry Cline Sarah Clementina Drummond-Burrell Samuel Wyatt
Lord George Lennox George Bussy Villiers Henry FitzRoy 5th Duke of Grafton
John Bell (Surgeon) Robert Smirke (Painter) John Kennedy (Manufacturer)
John Gell Dugald Stewart Louisa Gurney Hoare
William Nicol (Surgeon) William Nicol (Geologist) Edward Hall Alderson
Thomas Hope Richard Cosway Jonathan Backhouse
Lady Sarah Lennox John Byng, 5th Viscount Torrington Harriette Wilson
Andrew Plimer George Henry Borrow Charles Lamb
Henry Somerset, 5th Duke of Beaufort Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst Skeffington Lutwidge
George Colman the Elder William Hotham Jacob Bell
Charles Heathcote Tatham William Allen (Quaker) John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute
John Henry Manners, 5th Duke of Rutland William Gell Richard Barry, 7th Earl Barrymore
Samuel Bagster the Younger Lady Anne (Wesley) Fitzroy Samuel Gurney
John Liston Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond Luke Howard
Alexander MacKenzie (Explorer) John Pasco Joseph Black
Sir Robert Calder Benjamin Travers John Walker (Cricketer)
John (Johnnie) Walker Joseph Fox the Younger Bishop Beilby Porteus
Sir William Knighton George Rose Edward St. Maur 11th Duke of Somerset
Samuel Bagster the Elder Richard Keppel Craven Edwin Henry Landseer
James Paull (Duelist) Henry Thornton Peter Pond
George Rose (Barrister) William Vincent Humphry Repton
Eliab Harvey Sir George Henry Rose James Kenney
James Kennedy Nevil Maskelyne James Playfair
John Auldjo Thomas Morton (Shipbuilder) Charles Kemble
Sir John Vaughan (Judge) Henry Paget Henry Holland (Cricketer)
Sir Henry Holland (Baronet) Mary Alcock Tom Walker (Cricketer)
Thomas Bradley (Physician) Henry Dundas Trotter Thomas Picton
Sir Charles Middleton William Henry Playfair John Palmer (The 2 Architects)
William Ludlam Thomas Ludlam John Pinch the Elder
George Harris, 1st Baron Edward Waring William Aubrey de Vere Beauclerk 9th Duke of St Albans
Isaac Milner Sir Henry Blackwood William Lovett
General Sir Edward Paget Colonel John Vaughan William Locker
William George Keith Elphinstone Sir William Parker Baronet of Harburn Charles Hutton
John Thomas ‘Antiquity’ Smith Thomas Grey Egerton

1st Earl of Wilton

William Allen (Royal Navy Officer)
Thomas Baldwin Nathaniel Plimer Sir Edward Berry
Charles Gordon Lennox 5th Duke of Richmond George Combe Henry Siddons
Angela Burdett-Coutts William Ellis (Painter) William Drummond of Logiealmond
William George Harris Gerrard Andrewes Berkeley Paget
John Palmer (postal Innovator) Thomas Ludlam Henry Hetherington
Sir Charles Bagot Edward Ellice Francis Douce
Sir Hector Munro Richard Harris Barham Andrew Meikle
William Anderson (Artist) William Hunter Cavendish 5th Duke of Devonshire William Stewart Rose
Harriet Murray John Hunter (Politician) John Thomas Serres
Joseph Antonio Emidy Joseph Hume Thomas Holcroft
Archibald Alison Abraham Rees Thomas Helmore
Colonel William Berkeley Thomas Hearne Richard Carlile
Julius Caesar Ibbetson George Howard, 6th Earl of Carlisle John Rennie
William Oxberry William Hornby William Holme Twentyman
Charles Howard 11th Duke of Norfolk Gerard Lake Sir Archibald Alison, 1st Baronet
Isaac Taylor Edward Howard-Gibbon Marquis of Stafford Granville Leveson-Gower
Robert Aspland George Harris 3rd Baron Harris Thomas Telford
George Phillip Manners Arthur Hill, 3rd Marquess of Downshire Daniel Gurney
Sir Peter Parker John Horsley Palmer Richard Watson (politician)
Joseph Farington Charles Fitzroy, Baron Southampton William Henry West Betty
Charles Stuart (British Army Officer) Marguerite Gardiner, Countess of Blessington Paul III Anton, Prince Esterházy
William Danby George Macartney Richard Payne Knight
Admiral Adam Duncan James George Smith Neill

There will be many other notables coming, a full and changing list can be found here on the blog as I keep adding to it. The list so far is:

  • Victoria
  • Granville Sharp
  • Elizabeth (Gurney) Fry
  • Adam Ferguson of Raith
  • John Pinch the Younger
  • John Palmer (Commissary)
  • William Paley
  • Richard Watson
  • Joseph Louis Lagrange
  • Joseph Milner
  • James Hutton
  • John Boydell
  • Viscount Robert Castlereagh
  • George Canning
  • James Stirling
  • John MacBride
  • William Waldegrave
  • Price Blackwood
  • Alexander Ball
  • William Beatty
  • Sir Sidney Smith
  • Sidney Smith (wit)
  • Geroge Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer
  • John Thomas Duckworth
  • Robert Linzee
  • David Dundas
  • Sir Hyde Parker
  • Sir Thomas Hardy
  • Thomas Hardy (Reformer)
  • Sir William Parker
  • Major General John Dalling
  • William Cornwallis
  • Charles Cornwallis
  • William Baillie (artist)
  • Sir Ralph Abercromby
  • Elizabeth Inchbald
  • George Colman the Younger
  • Thomas Morton
  • Henry Proctor (British Army Officer)
  • Sir George Colebrooke
  • Robert Emmet
  • Thomas Fortescue Kennedy
  • William Taylor of Norwich
  • John Romilly
  • Sir John Herschel
  • John Horne Tooke
  • James Mill
  • Robert Owen
  • Jeremy Bentham
  • John Stuart Mill
  • Thomas Cochrane
  • Edward Jenner
  • Claire Clairmont
  • Fanny Imlay
  • William Godwin
  • William Hazlitt
  • Mary Wollstonecraft
  • James Edward Smith
  • General Sir Robert Arbuthnot
  • Harriet Fane Arbuthnot
  • James Edwards (Bookseller)
  • William Gifford
  • Sir Joseph Banks
  • Richard Porson
  • Edward Gibbon
  • James Smithson
  • William Cowper
  • Jacob Phillipp Hackert
  • Wellington (the Military man)
  • Cuthbert Collingwood
  • Admiral Sir Graham Moore
  • Sydney Smith
  • Admiral Sir William Sydney Smith
  • Admiral Sir Joseph Sydney Yorke
  • Richard Colt Hoare
  • Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville
  • William Howe
  • Richard Howe
  • Viscount Sir Samuel Hood
  • Sir Samuel Hood
  • Alexander Hood
  • Thomas Hope
  • Thomas Babington Macaulay
  • Harriet Martineau
  • Napoleon Bonaparte
  • Charles Pepys, Earl of Cottenham
  • Sir Edward Michael Pakenham
  • General Banastre Tarleton
  • Francis Leggatt Chantrey
  • Sir Charles Grey
  • Charles Grey, 1st Earl Grey
  • Sir Charles Edward Grey
  • John Constable
  • Thomas Lawrence
  • Sir William Lawrence, 1st Baronet
  • George Cruikshank
  • Thomas Gainsborough
  • James Gillray
  • Joseph Priestley
  • William Whewell
  • Horace Walpole
  • Sir Anthony Carlisle
  • Thomas Rowlandson
  • William Blake
  • Isambard Kingdom Brunel
  • Sir Marc Brunel
  • Marquis of Stafford George Leveson-Gower
  • George Stephenson
  • Joseph Locke
  • Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton
  • John Nash
  • John Soane
  • Robert Smirke (architect)
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Robert Southey
  • Henry Holland
  • Sir Walter Scott
  • John Scott, Earl of Eldon
  • Lord Elgin
  • William Windham
  • William Cobbett
  • Madame de Stael
  • John Walker (inventor)(Natural Historian)(Lexicographer)
  • James Boswell
  • Edward James Eliot
  • William Harrison Ainsworth
  • Sir Harry Smith
  • Thomas Cochrane
  • Warren Hastings
  • Edmund Burke
  • William Petty
  • Juana Maria de Los Dolores de Leon (Lady Smith)
  • Lord Bedford, Francis Russell (1765-1802)
  • Colonel George Hanger (c.1751-1824)
  • Lord Hertford, Francis Seymour-Ingram (1743-1822)
  • Louis Philippe Joseph, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1785 as Duc d’ Orleans (1747-1793)
  • Louis Philippe, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1793 as Duc d’ Orleans (1773-1850)
  • Captain John (Jack) Willett Payne (1752-1803)
  • Admiral Lord Hugh Seymour (1759-1801)
  • John Bell
  • Richard Colley Wellesley
  • Henry Wellesley
  • James Wyatt
  • John Blaquiere, 1st Baron de Blaquiere
  • William Pole-Tylney-Long-Wellesley
  • Lord FitzRoy Somerset, 1st Baron Raglan
  • John Fane, 11th Earl of Westmorland
  • Robert Smith, 1st Baron Carrington
  • James Watt
  • John Carr (architect)
  • Henry Thrale
  • John Hunter (Royal Navy)
  • Joseph Pease
  • Richard Trevithick
  • James Foster
  • Emily Lennox
  • Louisa Lennox
  • Thomas Baillie (Royal Navy officer)
  • Charles James Napier
  • John Thelwall
  • Sir William Hotham
  • Beaumont Hotham
  • Matthew Boulton
  • Sir Charles Bell
  • James Gregory
  • John McMahon
  • Edward Maltby
  • Joseph Chitty
  • Ricahrd Barnewell
  • Charles James Blomfield
  • William Carr Beresford, 1st Viscount Beresford
  • Maria Hadfield
  • John Byng 1st Earl of Strafford
  • George Byng 6th Viscount Torrington
  • John Russell, 1st Earl Russell
  • James Spencer-Bell
  • George Brydges Rodney
  • Samuel Pepys Cockerell
  • John Linnell
  • Charles Catton the Younger
  • Frederick Howard, 5th Earl of Carlisle
  • Benjamin Robert Haydon
  • John Dalton
  • Sir Philip Durham
  • William Hasledine Pepys
  • William Babington
  • Joseph Lancaster
  • Samuel Whitbread
  • Francis Augustus Collier
  • Humphry Davy
  • George Shillibeer
  • Samuel Hoare Jr.
  • Thomas Moore
  • Edward Dodwell
  • Archibald Norman McLeod
  • George Vancouver
  • Sir George Simpson
  • William Morgan (actuary)
  • Harry Walker
  • Alexander Walker
  • George Templer
  • Thomas Landseer
  • Sir Robert Inglis
  • Frederick Richard Lee
  • William McGillivray
  • Lucia Elizabeth Vestris
  • John Vaughan 3rd Earl of Lisburne
  • Samuel Rogers
  • Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • Edward Troughton
  • John Richardson
  • John Forsyth
  • Edward Ellice
  • John MacDonald of Garth
  • Sir Archibald Campbell
  • Simon McGillivray
  • Maria Theresa Kemble
  • Thomas Muir of Huntershill
  • Thomas Fyshe Palmer
  • Maurice Margarot
  • Captain William Paget
  • Sir Arthur Paget
  • Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Paget
  • Charles Burney
  • Lord Frederick Beauclerk
  • William Fullarton
  • Francis Jeffrey
  • Charles Simeon
  • Thomas de Quincey
  • James Watson
  • Daniel O’Connell
  • Feargus O’Connor
  • Joseph Nollekens
  • Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster
  • Andrew Geddes
  • Andrew Combe
  • Sir William Hamilton, 9th Baronet
  • William Ellis
  • William A. F. Browne
  • Robert William Elliston
  • William Henry Murray
  • Daniel Terry
  • Joanna Baillie
  • Theodore Hook
  • Robert Scott Lauder
  • Chauncey Hare Townshend
  • Paul Sandby
  • William Heberden the Younger
  • Henry Paget, 1st Earl of Uxbridge
  • Richard Hurd
  • George Mudie
  • Abel Heywood
  • John Cleave
  • George Holyoake
  • Charles Poulett Thomson
  • William Charles Keppel, 4th Earl of Albemarle
  • Thomas Coke, 1st Earl of Leicester
  • George Rennie
  • Elizabeth Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire
  • Frederick Hervey
  • Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Earl Granville
  • Sir Augustus William James Clifford
  • Charles Murray
  • George Lamb (politician and Writer)
  • Dr William Pulteney Alison
  • Francis Baring
  • Thomas Rees
  • John Jones
  • Sir James Edward Smith
  • John Evans
  • Thomas Jervis
  • Olivia Serres
  • Derwent Coleridge
  • Maurice Berkeley, 1st Baron FitzHardinge
  • Henry FitzHardinge Berkeley
  • Grantley Berkeley
  • Craven Berkeley
  • George Cranfield-Berkeley
  • Sir George Beaumont, 7th Baronet
  • Ralph Payne, 1st Baron Lavington
  • Joseph Mallord William Turner
  • Thomas Girtin
  • Thomas Monro
  • George Dance the Younger
  • William Daniell
  • Henry Monro
  • Henry Hunt
  • William Hone
  • James Wilson
  • Robert Taylor (Radical)
  • Benjamin West
  • John Hoppner
  • William Roscoe
  • Thomas Harrison (architect)
  • John Rennie the Younger
  • Sir Samuel Bentham
  • Thomas John Dibdin
  • George Soane
  • John Emery
  • Elizabeth Rebecca Edwin
  • Lawrence Holme Twentyman
  • Mary Ann Gibbon
  • Matthew Howard-Gibbon
  • Sir William Woods
  • John Hely-Hutchinson, 2nd Earl of Donoughmore
  • Patrick Tytler
  • Robert Scott Lauder
  • Isaac Taylor of Ongar
  • Josiah Conder
  • Robert Hall
  • John Foster
  • Olinthus Gilbert Gregory
  • Jane Taylor
  • John Wilson (Scottish writer)
  • Sir James Stephens
  • Ann Taylor (poet)
  • John Eyre
  • Thomas Noon Talfourd
  • Southwood Smith
  • William Johnson Fox
  • Walter Wilson
  • Sir William Pulteney, 5th Baronet
  • William Jessop
  • Benjamin Outram
  • Thomas Campbell
  • Phillip Hardwick
  • Charles Harcourt Masters
  • William Hay, 17th Earl of Erroll
  • Henry Thoby Prinsep
  • Sir Peter Parker, 2nd Baronet
  • John Nichols Thom
  • Thomas Taylour, 1st Marquess of Headfort
  • George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer
  • Charles FitzRoy, 3rd Baron Southampton
  • John Home
  • Frederick Edward Jones
  • John Stuart, 1st Marquess of Bute
  • William Stuart
  • James Archibald Stuart
  • Lady Louisa Stuart
  • James Lowther
  • Charles Stuart, 1st Baron Stuart de Rothesay
  • Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 1st Earl of Minto
  • Andrew Blayney, 11th Baron Blayney
  • Charles Gardiner, 1st Earl of Blessington
  • Richard Robert Madden
  • Walter Savage Landor
  • Sir George Staunton
  • Sir Erasmus Gower
  • William Gilpin
  • Uvedale Price
  • Henry Trollope
  • Sir Richard Onslow
  • Henry Duncan
  • Henry Havelock

The Dukes

  • Duke of Norfolk, Bernard Edward Howard (1765-1842)
  • Duke of Norfolk, Henry Charles Howard (1791-1856)
  • Duke of Somerset, Edward Adolphus Seymour (1804-1885)
  • Duke of Argyll, George William Campbell (1766-1839)
  • Duke of Queensberry, William Douglas (1724-1810)
  • Duke of York , Frederick Augustus Hanover (1763-1827)
  • Duke of Grafton, Augustus Henry FitzRoy, 3rd Duke 1735-1811
  • Duke of Grafton, George FitzRoy, 4th Duke 1760-1844
  • Duke of Gordon, Alexander 4th Duke 1743-1827
  • Duke of Northumberland, Hugh Percy 1742-1817

The Royals

  • Ernest Augustus 1 of Hanover

The Dandy Club

  •         Beau Brummell
  •         William Arden, 2nd Baron Alvanley

Patronesses of Almacks

  •         Emily Lamb, Lady Cowper
  •         Amelia Stewart, Viscountess Castlereagh
  •         Sarah Villiers, Countess of Jersey
  •         Maria Molyneux, Countess of Sefton
  •         Dorothea Lieven, Countess de Lieven, wife of the Russian Ambassador
  •         Countess Esterhazy, wife of the Austrian Ambassador

If there are any requests for personalities to be added to the list, just let us know in the comments section

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First ECO Agents book available

Those who follow me for a long time know that I also write in other fields aside from Regency Romance and the historical novels I do. A few months ago, before the end of last year and after 2011 NaNoWriMo, (where I wrote the first draft of another Regency) I started work on a project with my younger brother Douglas (All three of my brothers are younger brothers.)

The premise, as he is now an educator but once was a full on scientist at the NHI and FBI (Very cloak and dagger chemistry.) was that with the world having become green, and more green aware every week, why not have a group of prodigies, studying at a higher learning educational facility tackle the ills that have now begun to beset the world.

So it is now released. We are trickling it out to the major online channels and through Amazon it will be available in trade paperback. Available at Amazon for your Kindle, or your Kindle apps and other online bookstores. For $5.99 you can get this collaboration between the brothers Wilkin.

Or get it for every teenager you know who has access to a Kindle or other eReader.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

iBookstore for your Apple iDevices

Amazon for your Kindle

Five young people are all that stands between a better world and corporate destruction.

Parker, Priya, JCubed, Guillermo and Jennifer are not just your average high school students. They are ECOAgents, trusted the world over with protecting the planet.

Our Earth is in trouble. Humanity has damaged our home. Billionaire scientist turned educator, Dr. Daniel Phillips-Lee, is using his vast resources to reverse this situation.

Zedadiah Carter, leader of the Earth’s most powerful company, is only getting richer, harvesting resources, with the aid of not so trustworthy employees. When the company threatens part of the world’s water supply, covering up their involvement is business as usual.

The Ecological Conservation Organization’s Academy of Higher Learning and Scientific Achievement, or simply the ECO Academy, high in the hills of Malibu, California overlooking the Pacific Ocean, is the envy of educational institutions worldwide. The teenage students of the ECO Academy, among the best and brightest the planet has to offer, have decided they cannot just watch the world self-destruct. They will meet this challenge head on as they begin to heal the planet.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

James George Smith Neill
26 May 1810 – 25 September 1857

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James George Smith Neill

Neill was born at Swindridgemuir, Scotland and educated at the University of Glasgow. Entering the service of the British East India Company in 1827, he received his lieutenant’s commission a year later. From 1828 to 1852 he was mainly employed in duty with his regiment, the 1st Madras Europeans (of which he wrote a Historical Record), but gained some experience on the general and the personal staffs as D.A.A.G. and as aide-de-camp. In 1850 he received his majority, and two years later set out for the Second Burmese War with the regiment. He served throughout the war with distinction, became second-in-command to Cheape, and took part in the minor operations which followed, receiving the brevet of lieutenant-colonel.

In June 1854 he was appointed second-in-command to Sir Robert Vivian to organize the Turkish contingent for the Crimean War. Early in 1857 he returned to India. Six weeks after his arrival came the news that all northern India was aflame with revolt. Neill acted promptly; he left Madras with his regiment at a moment’s notice, and proceeded to Benares. As soon as he arrived on 3 June, he preemptively disbanded the local native regiment. A regiment of Sikhs stationed at Varanasi, normally considered ‘loyal’, revolted. They fled after Neill’s commanders shot at them, but returned to duty later.

On 9 June, General Neill set out for Allahabad, where a handful of Europeans still held out in the fort against the rebels. General Neill ordered hanging of those suspected of being the mutineers. His Sikh forces stationed at Jaunpur revolted upon seeing these massacres. From 6 to 15 June his men forced their way under conditions of heat and of opposition.

Allahabad was soon made the concentration of Henry Havelock’s column. Neill then turned to the besieged Kanpur. Following the Bibighar massacre of British women and children at Kanpur, General Neill indulged in indiscriminate killings of Indians. He inflicted the death penalty on all his prisoners. He compelled the high-caste Brahmins to wash up the blood of the Bibighar victims from the floor, an act that degraded them with the loss of caste. The prisoners were then hanged.

Meanwhile, Havelock, in spite of a succession of victories had been compelled to fall back for lack of men; and Neil criticized his superior’s action with a total want of restraint. A second expedition had the same fate, and Neill himself was now attacked, though by his own exertions and Havelock’s victory at Bithor (16 August) the tension on the communications was ended. Havelock’s men returned to Cawnpore, and cholera broke out there, whereupon Neill again committed himself to criticisms, this time addressed to the commander-in-chief and to Outram, who was on the way with reinforcements.

In spite of his very grave acts of insubordination, Havelock gave his rival a brigade command in the final advance. The famous march from Cawnpore to Lucknow began on 18 September; on the 21st there was a sharp fight, on the 22nd incessant rain, on the 23rd intense heat. On the 23rd the fighting opened with the assault on the Alum Bagh, Neill at the head of the leading brigade recklessly exposing himself. Next day he was again heavily engaged, and on the 25th he led the great attack on Lucknow itself. The fury of his assault carried everything before it, and his men were entering the city when their commander was suddenly killed in action at Lucknow – 25 September 1857.

Shot in the head at Khas Bazaar. The rank and precedence of the wife of a K.C.B. was given to his widow, and memorials have been erected in Lucknow and at Ayr. Memorial at the Residency, Lucknow reads – “Sacred to the memory of Brigadier General J.G.S. Neill A.D.C. to the Queen.” (and others) An island in the Andamans was named after him, as a mark of honour and now Neill Island (or Neil Island), with its pristine beaches, is a popular tourist destination in India.

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Trolling’s Pass and Present

Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but I also have delved into Fantasy.

The Trolling series, (the first three are in print) is the story of a man, Humphrey. We meet him as he has left youth and become a man with a man’s responsibilities.

We follow him in a series of stories that encompass the stages of life. We see him when he starts his family, when he has older sons and the father son dynamic is tested.

We see him when his children begin to marry and have children, and at the end of his life when those he has loved, and those who were his friends proceed him over the threshold into death. All this while he serves a kingdom troubled by monsters.

Troubles that he and his friends will learn to deal with and rectify.

It is now available in a variety of formats. For $2.99 you can get this fantasy adventure.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

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Years since their battles with the Trolls, even on foreign soil, the warriors of the Valley Kingdom of Torahn need something to keep their edge honed. The economy too is beginning to fray a little without the great wars to support.

The Leaders hit upon the idea of searching for a path to reach the east side of the continent. The Elves swear that at one time their writings tell of such, the Dwarves swear such a pass across Teantellen is legendary.

Teantellen though is filled with races man has never gotten along with well. Goblins, Dark Elves, Trolls, Giants and Dragons. It has been years since the mountain tops exploded, and perhaps that has changed things enough that a way can be found to link the western lands with the eastern lands and increase trade, and prosperity for all.

Even should they fail in their quest, as the history of man has shown to this point in time, the attempt will do much to spur the economy. Tens of thousands of gold will be spent by the Council of Twenty-One to pay for such an expedition.

Gold that those who are not so scrupulous might choose to pocket as they tried in the Troll Wars. With such shenanigans taking place again, are the hopes of the previous generation, the leaders from the Troll Wars now in retirement, ready to be achieved?

Is it time for Torahn, called the Valley Kingdom, but the only Kingdom without a King, to have a King once more?

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Admiral Adam Duncan
1 July 1731 – 4 August 1804

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Admiral Adam Duncan

Duncan was a British admiral who defeated the Dutch fleet off Camperdown (north of Haarlem) on 11 October 1797. This victory was considered one of the most significant actions in naval history.

Adam was the second son of Alexander Duncan of Lundie, Provost of Dundee, and his wife Helen, born at Dundee. In 1746, after receiving his education in Dundee, he entered the Royal Navy on board the sloop Trial, under Captain Robert Haldane, with whom, in HMS Trial and afterwards in HMS Shoreham, he continued till the peace in 1748. In 1749 he was appointed to HMS Centurion, then commissioned for service in the Mediterranean, by the Hon. Augustus Keppel (afterwards Viscount Keppel), with whom he was afterwards in HMS Norwich on the coast of North America, and was confirmed in the rank of lieutenant in 1755.

In August 1755 he followed Keppel to the Swiftsure, and in January 1756 to the Torbay, in which he continued till his promotion to commander’s rank in 1759. During this time he was present in the expedition to Basque Roads in 1757, at the reduction of Gorée in 1758, and in the blockade of Brest in 1759.

From October 1759 to April 1760 he had command of the Royal Exchange, a hired vessel employed in petty convoy service with a miscellaneous ship’s company, consisting to a large extent of boys and foreigners, many of whom (he reported) could not speak English, and all impressed with the idea that as they had been engaged by the merchants from whom the ship was hired so they were not subject to naval discipline. It would seem that a misunderstanding with the merchants on this point was the cause of the ship’s being put out of commission after a few months.

As a commander Duncan had no further service, but in 1761 he was posted and appointed to the HMS Valiant, fitting for Keppel’s broad pennant. In her he had an important share in the reduction of Belle Île in June, and of Havana in August 1762. He returned to England in 1763, and, notwithstanding his repeated request, had no further employment for many years.

During this time he lived principally at Dundee, and married in 1777 Henrietta, daughter of Robert Dundas of Arniston, Lord President of the Court of Session. It would seem that his alliance with this influential family obtained him the employment which he had been vainly seeking during fifteen years. Towards the end of 1778 he was appointed to HMS Suffolk, from which he was almost immediately moved into HMS Monarch.

In January 1779 he sat as a member of the court-martial of Admiral Keppel for the poor performance of the Channel Fleet during the First Battle of Ushant. During the course of the trial Duncan objected several times to stop the prosecutor in irrelevant and in leading questions, or in perversions of answers. The admiralty was therefore desirous that he should not sit on the court-martial of Sir Hugh Palliser for failure to obey orders during the same battle. The court-martial was set for April. The day before the assembling of the court the admiralty sent down orders for the Monarch to go to St. Helens. Her crew, however, refused to weigh the anchor until they were paid their advance; and as this could not be done in time, the Monarch was still in Portsmouth harbour when the signal for the court-martial was made; so that, sorely against the wishes of the admiralty, Duncan sat on this court-martial also.

During the summer of 1779 the Monarch was attached to the Channel fleet under Sir Charles Hardy; in December was one of the squadron with which Rodney sailed for the relief of Gibraltar, and had a prominent share in the action off St. Vincent on 16 January 1780. On returning to England Duncan quit the Monarch, and had no further command till after the change of Ministry in 1782, when Keppel became first lord of the admiralty. He was then appointed to HMS Blenheim of 90 guns, and commanded her during the year in the Grand Fleet under Howe, at the relief of Gibraltar in October, and the encounter with the allied fleet off Cape Spartel. He afterwards succeeded Sir John Jervis in command of the Foudroyant, and after the peace commanded HMS Edgar as guardship at Portsmouth for three years. He attained flag rank on 24 September 1787, became Vice Admiral in 1793, and was promoted to Admiral in 1795. At which time he was appointed commander-in-chief in the North Sea, and hoisted his flag on board HMS Venerable.

During the first two years of Duncan’s command the work was limited to enforcing a rigid blockade of the enemy’s coast, but in the spring of 1797 it became more important from the knowledge that the Dutch fleet in the Texel was getting ready for sea.

The situation was one of extreme difficulty, for the mutiny which had paralyzed the fleet at the Nore broke out also in mutiny under Duncan, and kept it for some weeks in enforced inactivity. Duncan’s personal influence and some happy displays of his vast personal strength held the crew of the Venerable to their duty; but with one other exception, that of the Adamant, the ships refused to quit their anchorage at Yarmouth, leaving the Venerable and Adamant alone to keep up the pretense of the blockade.

Fortunately the Dutch were not at the time ready for sea; and when they were ready and anxious to sail, with thirty thousand troops, for the invasion of Ireland, a persistent westerly wind detained them in harbour till they judged that the season was too far advanced. For political purposes, however, the French Revolutionaries who controlled the government in Holland, in spite of the opinion of their admiral, De Winter, to the contrary, ordered him to put to sea in the early days of October.

Duncan, with the main body of the fleet, was at the time lying at Great Yarmouth revictualling, the Texel being watched by a small squadron under Captain Henry Trollope in HMS Russell, from whom he received early information of the Dutch being at sea. He at once weighed anchor, and with a fair wind approached the Dutch coast, saw that the fleet was not returned to the Texel, and steering towards the south sighted it on the morning of 11 October about seven miles from the shore and nearly halfway between the villages of Egmont and Camperdown. The wind was blowing straight on shore, and though the Dutch forming their line to the north preserved a bold front, it was clear that if the attack was not made promptly they would speedily get into shoal water, where no attack would be possible. Duncan at once realized the necessity of cutting off their retreat by getting between them and the land. At first he was anxious to bring up his fleet in a compact body, for his numbers were at best equal to those of the Dutch; but seeing the absolute necessity of immediate action, without waiting for the ships astern to come up, without waiting to form line of battle, and with the fleet in very irregular order of sailing, in two groups, led respectively by himself in the Venerable and Vice-admiral Richard Onslow in the Monarch, he made the signal to pass through the enemy’s line and engage to leeward.

It was a bold departure from the absolute rule laid down in the Fighting Instructions, and on this occasion, was crowned with complete success. The engagement was long and bloody; for though Duncan, by passing through the enemy’s line, had prevented their untimely retreat, he had not advanced further in tactical science, and the battle was fought out on the primitive principles of ship against ship, the advantage remaining with those who were the better trained to the great gun exercise, though the Dutch by their obstinate courage inflicted great loss on the Royal navy.

It had been proposed to De Winter to make up for the want of skill by firing shell from the lower deck guns; and some experiments had been made during the summer which showed that the idea was feasible; but want of familiarity with an arm so new and so dangerous presumably prevented its being acted on in the battle.

The news of the victory was received in Britain with the warmest enthusiasm. It was the first certain sign that the mutinies of the summer had not destroyed the power and the prestige of the Royal Navy. Duncan was at once raised to the peerage as Viscount Duncan, of Camperdown, and Baron Duncan, of Lundie in the Shire of Perth (with which came the lands now known as Camperdown Park in Dundee), and there was a strong feeling that the reward was inadequate.

Even as early as 18 October his aunt, Lady Mary Duncan, wrote to Henry Dundas, at that time secretary of state for war: Report says my nephew is only made a Viscount. Myself it is nothing, but the whole nation thinks the least you can do is to give him an English earldom. … Am sure were this properly represented to our good king, who esteems a brave, religious man like himself, would be of my opinion. …. It was not, however, till 1831, many years after Duncan’s death, that his son, then bearing his title, was raised to the dignity of an earl, and his other children to the rank and precedence of the children of an earl.

Duncan was awarded the Large Naval Gold Medal and an annual pension of £3,000, to himself and the next two heirs to his title – this was the biggest pension ever awarded by the British government. Additionally, he was given the freedom of several cities, including Dundee and London.

Duncan continued in command of the North Sea fleet until 1801, but without any further opportunity of distinction. Three years later, 4 August 1804, he died quite suddenly, aged seventy-three, at the inn at Cornhill, a village on the border, where he had stopped for the night on his journey to Edinburgh and was buried in Lundie. He left a family of four daughters, and, besides the eldest son who succeeded to the peerage, a second son, Henry, who died a captain in the navy and K.C.H. in 1835.

  • Several ships have been named HMS Duncan after him.
  • Duncan Street in Leeds town centre is named for him. The pub on this street honours him with its name and many pictures and paintings.
  • The Galapagos island, now known as Pinzón Island, was named Duncan Island.
  • A statue of Duncan was erected in 1997 in his birthplace, Dundee, on the corner of High Street and Commercial Street.
  • Several public houses, including one in Soho, London, a gay pub that was the scene of a terrorist bombing in 1999, perpetuate his name.

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The Shattered Mirror

For your enjoyment, one of the Regency Romances I published. It is available for sale and now at a reduced price, and I hope that you will take the opportunity to order your copy.

Order for yourself or as a gift. It is now available in a variety of formats. For just a few dollars this Regency Romance can be yours for your eReaders or physically in Trade Paperback.

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Bridget Halifax-Stokes was giddy with the excitement of her season in London. Town had beckoned and her season came on the heels of the end of the war against the tyrant.

All the handsome men were returning heroes. What better year to come out. Her father thought it all nonsense. Her mother believed that it would be the best showing of any of her daughters.

More lords available and luck that Bridget was just the perfect age. All is fun and frivolity until Bridget literally crashes into Sir Patrick Hampton as he limps along the high street.

A man she knew once well, now a stranger with dark and foreboding eyes.

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