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Archive for March, 2013

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Lord George Lennox
November 29 1737-March 25 1805

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General Lord George Henry Lennox

General Lord George Henry Lennox was the second son of Charles Lennox the 2nd Duke of Richmond. He was the great-grandson of King Charles II of England. He was a brother of the four famous Lennox sisters and his elder brother was the third Duke of Richmond, Charles Lennox.


As the second son (there were actually a few other elder boys born to the 2nd Duke but they died in infancy) George was the spare and slated for a non-ruling career, in this case a military career.


From 1758 to 1762 George was the Colonel of the 33rd Regiment of Foot. In 1757 a second battalion (2nd/33rd) of the 33rd Regiment had been raised. In 1758 this battalion became an independent regiment, the 72nd Regiment of Foot. At that time his elder brother Charles Lennox had been the Colonel of the 33rd and was then appointed Colonel of the new regiment, the 72nd. George Lennox took command of the 33rd Regiment (1st/33rd).


At the beginning of May 1758 the 33rd Regiment was stationed in Blandford, and was then moved to the Isle of Wight to take part in an attack on the French coast at St Malo on the 5th of May in the Seven Years’ War.


On August 1st 1758 both brothers Regiments (33rd & 72nd) were involved in a raid on Cherbourg, which resulted in the destruction of 30 French ships, and the capture of 200 guns and a large quantity of booty. After this the 33rd Regiment remained inactive, garrisoned on the Isle of Wight.


In 1762, he was appointed Colonel of the King’s Own Scottish Borderers, which he commanded until his death. In 1784, he was appointed Constable of the Tower of London.


He married Lady Louisa kerr in 1759, the daughter of the the 4th Marquess of Lothian. They had four children. Their only son Charles, became the 4th Duke of Richmond.

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TWO PEAS IN A POD

Two Peas in a Pod has now passed the exclusivity to Amazon test and is available in wider release, electronically (digitally) for other readers now. We sold a few copies on Amazon but nothing to warrant an exclusivity period. Amazon is too big and too full of itself.

Two Peas in a Pod is still available as a Trade paperback click here to order Regency Assembly Press.

$3.99 for an electronic copy. The Trade Paperback, due to publishing costs and the cut that Amazon takes continue to see a Trade Paperback costing $15.99 (The much hyped royalties that we writers are supposed to get is nowhere near what the news reports say. Most of that price is taken by Amazon.)

Nook-Barnes and Noble

Smashwords

iBookstore (These are my books

and still at Amazon

Here is a picture, which of course you can click on to go fetch the book:

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TWO PEAS IN A POD

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Love is something that can not be fostered by deceit even should one’s eyes betray one’s heart.

Two brothers that are so close in appearance that only a handful have ever been able to tell them apart. The Earl of Kent, Percival Francis Michael Coldwell is only older than his brother, Peregrine Maxim Frederick Coldwell by 17 minutes. They may have looked as each other, but that masked how they were truthfully quite opposite to one another.

For Percy, his personality was one that he was quite comfortable with and more than happy to let Perry be of a serious nature. At least until he met Veronica Hamilton, the daughter of Baron Hamilton of Leith. She was only interested in a man who was serious.

Once more, Peregrine is obliged to help his older brother by taking his place, that the Earl may woo the young lady who has captured his heart. That is, until there is one who captures Peregrine’s heart as well.

There is a visual guide to Two Peas in a Pod RegencyEravisualresearchforTwoPeasinaPodTheThingsThatCatchMyEye-2012-08-22-08-41-2012-11-26-09-36-2013-03-28-07-26.jpg as well at Pinterest and a blog post here.

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Periodically I have asked for readers specifically for the Beggars Can’t Be Choosier project.

Beggars is a Regency Romance.

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My problem is, I am a guy…

And so as I guy, there are things that I can not experience, or even think that I can come close to.

Beggars though is a story that has things that a woman will experience that I do not want to get wrong. I have our heroine undergoing the tragedy of a miscarriage, and then later the process of childbirth. Both of which I have not encountered and so my understanding is second hand.

I would not want to have this make it to publication if the emotions of this part of life are handled poorly. If anyone would like to read the story and give me feedback of these scenes, or the entire work, I would appreciate it.

Please comment or send an email

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Samuel Wyatt
September 8 1737-February 8 1807

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Samuel Wyatt

Wyatt was a member of the famed Wyatt family which included many architects. In his twenties, Wyatt had become a master carpenter. Also a clerk of works for Robert Adam at Kedleston Hall. Samuel later worked with his brother James Wyatt on the Pantheon in London. Samuel designed country houses like Tatton Park, Trinity House and Digswell House.
He designed the Albion Mills, which was the first to be powered by steam engines, he patented designs for cast iron bridges. He designed model farm buildings, cottages, and several lighthouses.
From 1784 to 1807 Samuel worked on Holkham Hall estate, designing several farms, ‘The Great Barn’,a new kitchen garden and ‘The Vinery’. He used a simplified new-classical style.
He designed Soho House for his friend Matthew Boulton. Boulton had recommended him to the proprietors of the Theatre Royal of Birmingham in 1777, and in 1780, a portico designed by Wyatt was built. It is also believed that Boulton recommended him to James Watt, for whom Wyatt designed Heathfield House. Sameul also designed Moseley Hall.
With Charles Tatham Samuel designed Dropmore House for Lord Grenville, the Prime Minister. At the turn of the 18th century he remodeled and extended Shugborough Hall for Viscount Anson.

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Theater Royal Birmingham

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A Trolling We Will Go Omnibus:The Early Years
Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but I also have delved into Fantasy. The Trolling series is the story of a man, Humphrey. We meet him as he has left youth and become a man with a man’s responsibilities. We follow him in a series of stories that encompass the stages of life. We see him when he starts his family, when he has older sons and the father son dynamic is tested. We see him when his children begin to marry and have children, and at the end of his life when those he has loved, and those who were his friends proceed him over the threshold into death.
All this while he serves a kingdom troubled by monsters. Troubles that he and his friends will learn to deal with and rectify.
Here are the first three books together as one longer novel. A Trolling We Will Go, Trolling Down to Old Mah Wee and Trolling’s Pass and Present. Available in a variety of formats. For $6.99 you can get this fantasy adventure.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

Amazon for your Kindle
Trade Paperback
The stories of Humphrey and Gwendolyn. Published separately in: A Trolling we Will Go, Trolling Down to Old Mah Wee and Trollings Pass and Present. These are the tales of how a simple Woodcutter and an overly educated girl help save the kingdom without a king from an ancient evil.

Long forgotten is the way to fight the Trolls. Beasts that breed faster than rabbits it seems, and when they decide to migrate to the lands of humans, their seeming invulnerability spell doom for all in the kingdom of Torahn. Not only Torahn but all the human kingdoms that border the great mountains that divide the continent.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Sarah Clementina Drummond-Burrell, A Patroness of Almacks
May 5 1786-January 16 1865

The only surviving child of James Drummond, the 11th Earl of Perth. In 1807 she married Peter Robert Burrell, the 22nd Baron Willoughby de Eresby, 2nd Baron Gwydyr. (Grandson of the 3rd Duke of Ancaster) Peter was a member of Parliament for Boston and the Deputy Lord Great Chamberlain. He was a Dandy and a member of Brook’s Club..

Sarah was known as Clementina and by 1814 she was the youngest of the group of Patronesses of Almacks. With Lady Castlereagh she was considered to be the highest stickler and overly grand. There were several dances named for her, including “Clementina Sarah Drummond”, “Miss Sarah Drummond of Perth.” Her father died in 1800 and she inherited a large fortune. When she married Peter, he took Drummond as a family name. It may have been at Clementina’s instance, or because of the marriage settlement. At first they lived at Drummond Castle.

As a Dandy Peter spent, while Clementina was more thrifty. They may have been at odds over how to use money, but they did not seem to cheat on each other. No mistresses or lovers. Peter left parliament when his father died and went to Paris for a short time. When Peter’s mother died in 1828, Baroness of Eresby in her own right, the couple was now known as Lord and Lady Willoughby de Eresby from then on. It is said that Victoria visited them at Castle Drummond in 1842 and planted copper beech trees. Clementina was described as a Very Great Lady.

She and Peter had five children. One month after she died, Peter passed.

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Colonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence
For your holiday enjoyment, one of the Regency Romances I published. It is available for sale and I hope that you will take the opportunity to order your copy for the holiday season. For yourself or as a gift.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For just a few dollars this Regency Romance can be yours for your eReaders or physically in Trade Paperback.

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Barnes and Noble for your Nook or in Paperback

Smashwords

iBookstore

Amazon for your Kindle or in Trade Paperback
Witnessing his cousin marry for love and not money, as he felt destined to do, Colonel Fitzwilliam refused to himself to be jealous. He did not expect his acquaintance with the Bennet Clan to change that.

   Catherine Bennet, often called Kitty, had not given a great deal of thought to how her life might change with her sisters Elizabeth and Jane becoming wed to rich and connected men. Certainly meeting Darcy’s handsome cousin, a Colonel, did not affect her.

   But one had to admit that the connections of the Bingleys and Darcys were quite advantageous. All sorts of men desired introductions now that she had such wealthy new brothers.

   Kitty knew that Lydia may have thought herself fortunate when she had married Wickham, the first Bennet daughter to wed. Kitty, though, knew that true fortune had come to her. She just wasn’t sure how best to apply herself.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Henry Cline
1750-January 2 1827

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Henry Cline

Cline was born in London, and educated at Merchant Taylors’ School. When seventeen he apprenticed to Mr. Thomas Smith, and became a lecturer in anatomy.

He obtained his diploma in 1774. In 1781, Cline was appointed to lecture on anatomy. In 1784, the death of his old master Smith, allowed Cline to succeed him in a surgeoncy at St. Thomas’s Hospital. In 1796 to Lincoln’s Inn Fields, where he remained during the rest of his life.

In 1796 Cline was elected a member of the court of assistants of the Surgeons’ Company; but there were some shenanigans involved. It tool until 1800 when they were incorporated by charter as the Royal College of Surgeons, to fix this. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1806.

In 1808 Cline bought land at Bound’s Green in Essex, and visited it regularly, becoming greatly interested in agriculture, according to Astley Cooper, his pupil. When he was sixty years old his practice brought him about £10,000 per annum. In 1810 Cline became an examiner at the College of Surgeons. In 1815 he became master of the College of Surgeons. In 1823 Cline was president of the college.

Cline was a friend of John Horne Tooke, attending him professionally when in the Tower of London, and also friends with John Thelwell. He was in favor of the French Revolution and saw to Astley Cooper’s safety in Paris in 1792. He published Form of Animals in 1805. In 1775 Cline married Miss Webb. They had a son who also became a lecturer on anatomy and surgery, Henry, who died before his father.

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We’ll All Go A Trolling
Not only do I write Regency and Romance, but I also have delved into Fantasy. The Trolling series is the story of a man, Humphrey. We meet him as he has left youth and become a man with a man’s responsibilities. We follow him in a series of stories that encompass the stages of life. We see him when he starts his family, when he has older sons and the father son dynamic is tested. We see him when his children begin to marry and have children, and at the end of his life when those he has loved, and those who were his friends proceed him over the threshold into death.
All this while he serves a kingdom troubled by monsters. Troubles that he and his friends will learn to deal with and rectify.
It is now available in a variety of formats. For $2.99 you can get this fantasy adventure.

Trolling-5-Front-2013-03-25-07-26.jpg

Barnes and Noble for your Nook

Smashwords

Amazon for your Kindle
King Humphrey, retired, has his 80th birthday approaching. An event that he is not looking forward to. A milestone, of course, but he has found traveling to Torc, the capital of the Valley Kingdom of Torahn, a trial. He enjoys his life in the country, far enough from the center of power where his son Daniel now is King and rules.

Peaceful days sitting on the porch. Reading, writing, passing the time with his guardsmen, his wife, and the visits of his grandson who has moved into a manor very near. Why go to Torc where he was to be honored, but would certainly have a fight with his son, the current king.

The two were just never going to see eye to eye, and Humphrey, at the age of 80, was no longer so concerned with all that happened to others. He was waiting for his audience with the Gods where all his friends had preceded him. It would be his time soon enough.

Yet, the kingdom wanted him to attend the celebrations, and there were to be many. So many feasts and fireworks he could not keep track, but the most important came at the end, when word was brought that the Trolls were attacking once more.

Now Humphrey would sit as regent for his son, who went off to fight the ancient enemy. Humphrey had ruled the kingdom before, so it should not have been overwhelming, but at eighty, even the little things could prove troublesome.

Feedback

If you have any commentary, thoughts, ideas about the book (especially if you buy it, read it and like it 😉 then we would love to hear from you.        

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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

John Pitt Kennedy
1796-1879

Kennedy was born at Carndonagh in Ireland and educated at Foyle College in Derry. Then the Royal Military Academy in Woolwich. He became a lieutenant in the Royal Engineers in 1815. Four years later he was sent to Malta and after to Corfu. He was the superintendent of a canal at Lefkada in 1820 and served under Sir Charles Napier at Cephalonia. Later he was sub-inspector of the militia in the Ionian Islands.

Returning to Ireland, he began to work on ways to improve the lives of the agricultural classes. His work, Instruct; Employ; Don’t Hang Them: or Ireland Tranquilized without Soldiers and Enriched without English Capital in 1835 showcased his thoughts. He wrote more and was made Inspector General for Irish Education in 1837, secretary to the Devon Commission in 1843 and part of the famine relief committee in 1845. He was once again made part of the army in 1849 as military secretary to Napier and accompanied the man to India.

Kennedy then built the road from Kalka to Kunawur and Tibet. He also published British Home and Colonial Empire between 1865 and 1869.

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