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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

George Green
14 July 1793 – 31 May 1841

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George Green

Green was born and lived for most of his life in the English town of Sneinton, Nottinghamshire, now part of the city of Nottingham. His father, also named George, was a baker who had built and owned a brick windmill used to grind grain.

In his youth, Green was described as having a frail constitution and a dislike for doing work in his father’s bakery. He had no choice in the matter, however, and as was common for the time he likely began working daily to earn his living at the age of five.

Roughly 25–50% of children in Nottingham received any schooling in this period. The majority of schools were Sunday schools, run by the Church, and children would typically attend for one or two years only. Recognizing the young Green’s above average intellect, and being in a strong financial situation due to his successful bakery, his father enrolled him in March 1801 at Robert Goodacre’s Academy in Upper Parliament Street. Robert Goodacre was a well-known science populariser and educator of the time. He published Essay on the Education of Youth, in which he wrote that he did not “study the interest of the boy but the embryo Man”. To a non-specialist, he would have seemed deeply knowledgeable in science and maths, but a close inspection of his essay and curriculum revealed that the extent of his mathematical teachings was limited to algebra, trigonometry and logarithms. Thus, Green’s later mathematical contributions, which exhibited knowledge of very modern developments in maths, could not have resulted from his tenure at the Robert Goodacre Academy. He stayed for only four terms (one school year), and it was speculated by his contemporaries that he probably exhausted all they had to teach him.

In 1773 George’s father moved to Nottingham, which at the time had a reputation for being a pleasant town with open spaces and wide roads. By 1831, however, the population had increased nearly five times, in part due to the budding industrial revolution, and the city became known as one of the worst slums in England. There were frequent riots by starving workers, often associated with special hostility towards bakers and millers on the suspicion that they were hiding grain to drive up food prices.

For these reasons, in 1807, George Green senior bought a plot of land in Sneinton. On this plot of land he built a “brick wind corn mill”, now famously referred to as Green’s Windmill. It was technologically impressive for its time, but required nearly twenty-four hour maintenance, which was to become George Green’s burden for the next twenty years.

Just as with baking, Green found the responsibilities of operating the mill annoying and tedious. Grain from the fields was arriving continuously at the mill’s doorstep, and the sails of the windmill had to be constantly adjusted to the windspeed, both to prevent damage in high winds, and to maximise rotational speed in low winds. The millstones that would continuously grind against each other, could wear down or cause a fire if they ran out of grain to grind. Every month the stones, which weighed over a ton, would have to be replaced or repaired.

In 1823 Green formed a relationship with Jane Smith, the daughter of William Smith, hired by Green Senior as mill manager. Although Green and Jane Smith never married, Jane eventually became known as Jane Green and the couple had seven children together; all but the first had Green as a baptismal name. The youngest child was born 13 months before Green’s death. Green provided for his common-law wife and children in his will.

When Green was thirty, he became a member of the Nottingham Subscription Library. This library exists today, and was likely one of the only sources of Green’s advanced mathematical knowledge. Unlike more conventional libraries, the subscription library was exclusive to a hundred or so subscribers, and the first on the list of subscribers was the Duke of Newcastle. This library catered to requests for specialised books and journals that satisfied the particular interests of their subscribers.

In 1828, Green published An Essay on the Application of Mathematical Analysis to the Theories of Electricity and Magnetism, which is the essay he is most famous for today. It was published privately at the author’s expense, because he thought it would be presumptuous for a person like himself, with no formal education in mathematics, to submit the paper to an established journal. When Green published his Essay, it was sold on a subscription basis to 51 people, most of whom were friends and probably could not understand it.

The wealthy landowner and mathematician Edward Bromhead bought a copy and encouraged Green to do further work in mathematics. Not believing the offer was sincere, Green did not contact Bromhead for two years.

By 1829, the time when Green’s father died, the senior Green had become one of the gentry due to his considerable accumulated wealth and land owned, roughly half of which he left to his son and the other half to his daughter. The young Green, now thirty-six years old, consequently was able to use this wealth to abandon his miller duties and pursue mathematical studies.

Members of the Nottingham Subscription Library who knew Green repeatedly insisted that he obtain a proper University education. In particular, one of the library’s most prestigious subscribers was Sir Edward Bromhead, with whom Green shared many correspondences; he insisted that Green go to Cambridge.

In 1832, aged nearly forty, Green was admitted as an undergraduate at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. He was particularly insecure about his lack of knowledge of Greek and Latin, which were prerequisites, but it turned out not to be as hard for him to learn as he believed, as the expected mastery was not as high as he had expected. In the mathematics examinations, he won the first-year mathematical prize. He graduated BA in 1838 as a 4th Wrangler (the 4th highest scoring student in his graduating class, coming after James Joseph Sylvester who scored 2nd).

Following his graduation, Green was elected a fellow of the Cambridge Philosophical Society. Even without his stellar academic standing, the Society had already read and made note of his Essay and three other publications, and so Green was warmly welcomed.

The next two years provided an unparalleled opportunity for Green to read, write and discuss his scientific ideas. In this short time he published an additional six publications with applications to hydrodynamics, sound and optics.

In his final years at Cambridge, Green became rather ill, and in 1840 he returned to Sneinton, only to die a year later. There are rumours that at Cambridge, Green had “succumbed to alcohol”, and some of his earlier supporters, such as Sir Edward Bromhead, tried to distance themselves from him.

Green’s work was not well known in the mathematical community during his lifetime. Besides Green himself, the first mathematician to quote his 1828 work was the Briton Robert Murphy in his 1833 work. In 1845, four years after Green’s death, Green’s work was rediscovered by the young William Thomson (then aged 21), later known as Lord Kelvin, who popularised it for future mathematicians. According to the book “George Green” by D.M. Cannell, William Thomson noticed Murphy’s citation of Green’s 1828 essay but found it difficult to locate Green’s 1828 work; he finally got some copies of Green’s 1828 work from William Hopkins in 1845.

Green’s work on the motion of waves in a canal anticipates the WKB approximation of quantum mechanics, while his research on light-waves and the properties of the ether produced what is now known as the Cauchy-Green tensor.

Westminster Abbey has a memorial stone for Green in the nave adjoining the graves of Sir Isaac Newton and Lord Kelvin.

It is unclear to historians exactly where Green obtained information on current developments in mathematics, as Nottingham had little in the way of intellectual resources. What is even more mysterious is that Green had used “the Mathematical Analysis”, a form of calculus derived from Leibniz that was virtually unheard of, or even actively discouraged, in England at the time (due to Leibniz being a contemporary of Newton who had his own methods that were thus championed in England). This form of calculus, and the developments of mathematicians such as Laplace, Lacroix and Poisson were not taught even at Cambridge, let alone Nottingham, and yet Green had not only heard of these developments, but also improved upon them.

It is speculated that only one person educated in mathematics, John Toplis, headmaster of Nottingham High School 1806–1819, graduate from Cambridge and an enthusiast of French mathematics, is known to have lived in Nottingham at the time.
List of publications

  • An Essay on the Application of Mathematical Analysis to the Theories of Electricity and Magnetism. By George Green, Nottingham. Printed for the Author by T. Wheelhouse, Nottingham. 1828. (Quarto, vii + 72 pages.)
  • Mathematical Investigations concerning the Laws of the Equilibrium of Fluids analogous to the Electric Fluid, with other similar Researches. By George Green, Esq., Communicated by Sir Edward Ffrench Bromhead, Bart., M.A., F.R.S.L. and E. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 12 November 1832, printed in the Transactions 1833. Quatro, 64 pages.) Vol. III, Part I.
  • On the Determination of the Exterior and Interior Attractions of Ellipsoids of Variable Densities. By George Green, Esq., Caius College. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 6 May 1833, printed in the Transactions 1835. Quarto, 35 pages.) Vol. III, Part III.
  • Researches on the Vibration of Pendulums in Fluid Media. By George Green, Esq., Communicated by Sir Edward Ffrench Bromhead, Bart., M.A., F.R.S.S. Lond. and Ed. (Royal Society of Edinburgh, read 16 December 1833, printed in the Transactions 1836, Quarto, 9 pages.) Vol. III, Part I.
  • On the Motion of Waves in a Variable Canal of Small Width and Depth. By George Green, Esq., BA, of Caius College. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 15 May 1837, printed in the Transactions 1838. Quarto, 6 pages.) Vol. VI, Part IV.
  • On the Reflexion and Refraction of Sound. By George Green, Esq., BA, of Caius College, Cambridge. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 11 December 1837, printed in the Transactions 1838. Quarto, 11 pages.) Vol. VI, Part III.
  • On the Laws of Relexion and Refraction of Light at the common Surface of two non-crystallized Media. By George Green, Esq., BA, of Caius College. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 11 December 1837, printed in the Transactions 1838. Quarto, 24 pages.) Vol. VII, Part I.
  • Note on the Motion of Waves in Canals. By George Green, Esq., BA, of Caius College. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 18 February 1839, printed in the Transactions 1839. Quarto, 9 pages.) Vol. VII, Part I.
  • Supplement to a Memoir on the Reflexion and Refraction of Light. By George Green, Esq., BA, of Caius College. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 6 May 1839, printed in the Transactions 1839. Quarto, 8 pages.) Vol. VII, Part I.
  • On the Propagation of Light in Crystallized Media. By George Green, BA, Fellow of Caius College. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, read 20 May 1839, printed in the Transactions 1839. Quarto, 20 pages.) Vol. VII, Part II.

Colonel Fitzwilliam’s Correspondence For your enjoyment, one of the Regency Romances I published.

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Witnessing his cousin marry for love and not money, as he felt destined to do, Colonel Fitzwilliam refused to himself to be jealous. He did not expect his acquaintance with the Bennet Clan to change that.    

Catherine Bennet, often called Kitty, had not given a great deal of thought to how her life might change with her sisters Elizabeth and Jane becoming wed to rich and connected men. Certainly meeting Darcy’s handsome cousin, a Colonel, did not affect her.   

 But one had to admit that the connections of the Bingleys and Darcys were quite advantageous. All sorts of men desired introductions now that she had such wealthy new brothers.    

Kitty knew that Lydia may have thought herself fortunate when she had married Wickham, the first Bennet daughter to wed. Kitty, though, knew that true fortune had come to her. She just wasn’t sure how best to apply herself.

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Beggars Can’t Be Choosier Reviewed.

Beggars Can’t be Choosier BeggarsCover-2014-07-27-09-43.jpg was reviewed again today. Another fantastic Review and I hope you can go to this webpage The_Review_Group__Beggars_Can_t_be_Choosier_by_D_W_Wilkin_-_A_Review_by_Linda_Root_-2014-07-27-09-43.jpg to see it. I am even giving away a digital copy of Beggars to one of those who stop by and enters the drawing there.

The Review is a website that reviews Historical Novels and my book was selected to be reviewed by my not so near neighbor, Linda Root, who I met on the FaceBook various writing forums and then later found she lived on the other side of the mountain (about 1+ hours away). We have never met, but we might be the closest in distance of any other writer of the hundreds I have met. Linda writes Historicals and she chose to tackle Beggars. A genre that she hasn’t touched since college, and Linda has now been out of college long enough to have had a career and retire.

Her books include: 41SLBhKWBKL-2014-07-27-09-43.jpgMidwife’s Secret I: The mystery of the Hidden Princess and 51Ei-Ktwt7L-2014-07-27-09-43.jpg The First Marie and the Queen of Scots

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Augustus Henry FitzRoy 3rd Duke of Grafton
28 September 1735 – 14 March 1811

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Augustus Henry FitzRoy

Augustus Henry FitzRoy 3rd Duke of Grafton

A son of Lord Augustus FitzRoy, a Captain in the Royal Navy, and Elizabeth Cosby, daughter of Colonel William Cosby, who served as a colonial Governor of New York. His father was the third son of the 2nd Duke of Grafton and Lady Henrietta Somerset, which made FitzRoy a great-grandson of both the 1st Duke of Grafton and the Marquess of Worcester. He was notably a fourth-generation descendant of King Charles II and the 1st Duchess of Cleveland. His younger brother was the 1st Baron Southampton. From the death of his uncle in 1747, he was styled Earl of Euston as his grandfather’s heir apparent.

Lord Euston was educated at Hackney School, made the Grand Tour and obtained a degree at Peterhouse, University of Cambridge.

In 1756, he entered Parliament as MP for Boroughbridge, a pocket borough; several months later, he switched constituencies to Bury St Edmunds, which was controlled by his family. However, a year later, his grandfather died and he succeeded as 3rd Duke of Grafton, which elevated him to the House of Lords.

He first became known in politics as an opponent of Lord Bute, a favourite of King George III. Grafton aligned himself with the Duke of Newcastle against Lord Bute, whose term as Prime Minister was short-lived largely because it was felt that the peace terms to which he had agreed at the Treaty of Paris were not a sufficient return for Britain’s performance in the Seven Years War.

In 1765, Grafton was appointed a Privy Counsellor; then, following discussions with William Pitt the Elder, he was appointed Northern Secretary in Lord Rockingham’s first government. However, he retired the following year, and Pitt (by then Lord Chatham) formed a ministry in which Grafton was First Lord of the Treasury but not Prime Minister.

Chatham’s illness, at the end of 1767, resulted in Grafton becoming the Government’s effective leader (he is credited with entering the office of Prime Minister in 1768)(Just 33 years old), but political differences, the impact of the Corsican Crisis and the attacks of “Junius” led to his resignation in January 1770.

Also, in 1768, Grafton became Chancellor of Cambridge University. He became Lord Privy Seal in Lord North’s ministry (1771) but resigned in 1775, being in favor of conciliatory action towards the American colonists. In the second Rockingham ministry of 1782, he was again Lord Privy Seal. In later years he was a prominent Unitarian, being one of the early members of the inaugural Essex Street Chapel under Rev. Theophilus Lindsey.

On 29 January 1756, he married The Hon. Anne Liddell (1737–1804), daughter of the 1st Baron Ravensworth. They had three children:

  • Lady Georgiana FitzRoy , who married John Smyth
  • George Henry FitzRoy, 4th Duke of Grafton
  • General Lord Charles FitzRoy, who married, firstly, Frances Mundy, secondly, Lady Frances Stewart

After the Duchess had become pregnant by her lover, the Earl of Upper Ossory, she and the Duke were divorced by Act of Parliament in 1769 (DWW-When he was Prime Minister).

Two months later, in May 1769, the Duke married Elizabeth Wrottesley, daughter of the Reverend Sir Richard Wrottesley, Dean of Worcester. They had the following children:

  • Lord Henry FitzRoy, clergyman; he married Caroline Pigot
  • Lord Frederick FitzRoy.
  • Lady Augusta FitzRoy, who married Rev. George F. Tavel
  • Lady Frances FitzRoy, who married the 1st Baron Churchill
  • Admiral Lord William FitzRoy married Georgiana Raikes
  • Lord John Edward FitzRoy
  • Lady Charlotte FitzRoy
  • Lady Elizabeth FitzRoy married her cousin Lt. Gen. The Hon. William FitzRoy
  • Lady Isabella FitzRoy, married Barrington Pope Blachford

The Duke of Grafton’s Government:

  • Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, and Leader of the House of Lords: The Duke of Grafton
  • Lord Chancellor: The Lord Camden
  • Lord President of the Council: The Earl Gower
  • Lord Privy Seal: The Earl of Bristol
  • Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons: Lord North
  • Secretary of State for the Northern Department: Henry Seymour Conway (1766–1768), The Viscount Weymouth (1768), The Earl of Rochford (1768–1770)
  • Secretary of State for the Southern Department: The Earl of Shelburne (1766–1768), The Viscount Weymouth (1768–1770)
  • Secretary of State for the Colonies: The Earl of Hillsborough
  • Master-General of the Ordnance: The Marquess of Granby
  • First Lord of the Admiralty: Sir Edward Hawke

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

William Hone
3 June 1780 – 8 November 1842

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William Hone

Hone was born at Bath, and had a strict religious upbringing. The only education he received was to be taught to read from the Bible. His father moved to London in 1783, and in 1790 Hone was placed in an attorney’s office. After two and a half years in the office of a solicitor at Chatham he returned to London to become clerk to a solicitor at Gray’s Inn. But he disliked the law, and had learned to think for himself. To the great concern of his father, he joined the London Corresponding Society in 1796, which campaigned to extend the vote to working men and was deeply unpopular with the government, who had tried to charge its leaders with treason.

Hone married in 1800, and started a book and print shop with a circulating library in Lambeth Walk. He soon moved to St Martin’s Churchyard, where he brought out his first publication, Shaw’s Gardener (1806). It was at this time that he and his friend, John Bone, tried to establish a popular savings bank, and even spoke to the President of the Board of Trade about the project; they were unsuccessful. Bone then joined Hone in a bookseller’s business; but bankruptcy was the result.

In 1811, Hone was employed by the booksellers as auctioneer to the trade, and had an office in Ivy Lane. Independent investigations carried on by him into the condition of lunatic asylums led again to business difficulties and failure, but he took a small lodging in the Old Bailey, keeping himself and his now large family by contributions to magazines and reviews. He hired a small shop, or rather box, in Fleet Street but this was twice robbed, and valuable books lent for show were stolen. In 1815 he started the Traveller newspaper, and tried in vain to save Elizabeth Fenning, a cook convicted on thin evidence of poisoning her employers with arsenic. Although Fenning was executed, Hone’s 240 page book on the subject, The Important Results of an Elaborate Investigation into the Mysterious Case of Eliza Fenning — a landmark in investigative journalism – demolished the prosecution’s case.

From 1 February to 25 October 1817, Hone published the Reformists’ Register, using it to criticise state abuses, which he later attacked in the famous political squibs and parodies, illustrated by George Cruikshank. In April 1817 three ex-officio informations were filed against him by the attorney-general, Sir William Garrow. Three separate trials took place in the Guildhall before special juries on 18, 19 and 20 December 1817. The first, for publishing The Late John Wilkes’s Catechism of a Ministerial Member (1817), was before Mr Justice Abbot (afterwards Lord Tenterden); the second, for parodying the litany and libelling the Prince Regent in The Political Litany (1817), and the third, for publishing the Sinecurist’s Creed (1817), a parody on the Athanasian Creed, were before Lord Ellenborough.

The prosecution took the ground that the prints were harmful to public morals and brought the prayer-book and even religion itself into contempt. The real motives of the prosecution were political: Hone had ridiculed the habits and exposed the corruption of those in power. He went to the root of the matter when he wished the jury “to understand that, had he been a publisher of ministerial parodies, he would not then have been defending himself on the floor of that court.” In spite of illness and exhaustion Hone spoke on each of the three days for about seven hours. Although his judges were biased against him, he was acquitted on each count, and the result was received enthusiastically by immense crowds inside and outside the court. Soon afterwards, a public collection was made on his behalf.

Among Hone’s most successful political satires were The Political house that Jack built (1819), The Queen’s Matrimonial Ladder (1820), Ill favour of Queen Caroline, The Man in the Moon (1820) and The Political Showman (1821), all illustrated by Cruikshank. Many of his squibs are directed against a certain “Dr Slop”, a nickname given by him to Dr (afterwards Sir John) Stoddart, publisher of The Times. In researches for his defence he had come upon some curious and at that time little trodden literary ground, and the results were shown by his publication in 1820 of his Apocryphal New Testament, and in 1823 of his Ancient Mysteries Explained. In 1826 he published the Every-day Book, in 1827-1828 the Table-Book, and in 1829 the Year-Book. All three were collections of curious information on manners, antiquities and various other subjects.

These are the works by which Hone is best remembered. In preparing them he had the approval of Robert Southey and the assistance of Charles Lamb, but they were not financially successful, and Hone was lodged in King’s Bench Prison for debt. Friends, however, again came to his assistance, and he was established in a coffee-house in Gracechurch Street; but this, like most of his business enterprises, ended in failure. Hone’s attitude of mind had gradually changed to that of extreme devoutness, and during the latter years of his life, he became a follower of Rev. Thomas Binney and preached in Binney’s Weigh House Chapel, Eastcheap. In 1830 he edited Strutt’s Sports and Pastimes of the people of England, and he contributed to the first number of the Penny Magazine. He was also for some years sub-editor of The Patriot. He died at Tottenham and is buried at Dr Watts’ Walk in Abney Park Cemetery, Stoke Newington.

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables. The list of Previous Notables and Upcoming Entries has grown so long that I will post this once a week on Saturdays now.

Previous Notables (Click to see the Blog):

George III George IV Georgiana Cavendish
William IV Lady Hester Stanhope Lady Caroline Lamb
Princess Charlotte Queen Charlotte Charles James Fox
Queen Adelaide Dorothea Jordan Jane Austen
Maria Fitzherbert Lord Byron John Keats
Princess Caroline Percy Bysshe Shelley Cassandra Austen
Edmund Kean Thomas Clarkson Sir John Moore
John Burgoyne William Wilberforce Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Sarah Siddons Josiah Wedgwood Emma Hamilton
Hannah More John Phillip Kemble John Jervis, Earl St. Vincent
Ann Hatton Stephen Kemble Mary Robinson
Harriet Mellon Zachary Macaulay George Elphinstone
Thomas Babington George Romney Mary Moser
Ozias Humphry William Hayley Daniel Mendoza
Edward Pellew Angelica Kauffman Sir William Hamilton
David Garrick Pownoll Bastard Pellew Charles Arbuthnot
William Upcott William Huskisson Dominic Serres
Sir George Barlow Scrope Davies Charles Francis Greville
George Stubbs Fanny Kemble Thomas Warton
William Mason Thomas Troubridge Charles Stanhope
Robert Fulke Greville Gentleman John Jackson Ann Radcliffe
Edward ‘Golden Ball’ Hughes John Opie Adam Walker
John Ireland Henry Pierrepoint Robert Stephenson
Mary Shelley Sir Joshua Reynolds Francis Place
Robert Harding Evans Lord Thomas Foley Francis Burdett
John Gale Jones George Parker Bidder Sir George Warren
Edward Eliot William Beechey Eva Marie Veigel
Hugh Percy-Northumberland Charles Philip Yorke Lord Palmerston
Samuel Romilly John Petty 2nd Marquess Lansdowne Henry Herbert Southey
Stapleton Cotton Colin Macaulay Amelia Opie
Sir James Hall Henry Thomas Colebrooke Maria Foote
Sir David Baird Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville Dr. Robert Gooch
William Baillie James Northcote Horatio Nelson
Henry Fuseli Home Riggs Popham John Playfair
Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice 3rd Marquess Lansdowne Thomas Douglas 5th Earl of Selkirk Frederick Gerald “Poodle” Byng
Henry Somerset, 7th Duke of Beaufort John Wolcot (Peter Pindar) Joseph John Gurney
Edward John Eliot Henry Perronet Briggs George Lionel Dawson-Damer
Thomas Foley Mark Robinson Charles Culling Smith
Francis Charles Seymour-Ingram, 3rd Marquess of Hertford Thomas Fowell Buxton Tyrone Power
Richard Cumberland William Philip Molyneux, 2nd Earl of Sefton Edward Law, 1st Baron Ellenborough
Jeffry Wyattville Henry Mildmay Nicholas Wood
Hester Thrale Catherine Hughes, Baroness de Calabrella Admiral Israel Pellew
William Wellesley Pole, 3rd Earl of Mornington Henry Moyes Charles Fitzroy
Lord Granville Somerset Lumley St. George Skeffington William Playfair
John Lade Astley Cooper Matthew Gregory Lewis
Edward Pease Thomas Coutts John Urpeth Rastrick
Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond Captain William Baillie John Pitt Kennedy
Henry Cline Sarah Clementina Drummond-Burrell Samuel Wyatt
Lord George Lennox George Bussy Villiers Henry FitzRoy 5th Duke of Grafton
John Bell (Surgeon) Robert Smirke (Painter) John Kennedy (Manufacturer)
John Gell Dugald Stewart Louisa Gurney Hoare
William Nicol (Surgeon) William Nicol (Geologist) Edward Hall Alderson
Thomas Hope Richard Cosway Jonathan Backhouse
Lady Sarah Lennox John Byng, 5th Viscount Torrington Harriette Wilson
Andrew Plimer George Henry Borrow Charles Lamb
Henry Somerset, 5th Duke of Beaufort Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst Skeffington Lutwidge
George Colman the Elder William Hotham Jacob Bell
Charles Heathcote Tatham William Allen (Quaker) John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute
John Henry Manners, 5th Duke of Rutland William Gell Richard Barry, 7th Earl Barrymore
Samuel Bagster the Younger Lady Anne (Wesley) Fitzroy Samuel Gurney
John Liston Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond Luke Howard
Alexander MacKenzie (Explorer) John Pasco Joseph Black
Sir Robert Calder Benjamin Travers John Walker (Cricketer)
John (Johnnie) Walker Joseph Fox the Younger Bishop Beilby Porteus
Sir William Knighton George Rose Edward St. Maur 11th Duke of Somerset
Samuel Bagster the Elder Richard Keppel Craven Edwin Henry Landseer
James Paull (Duelist) Henry Thornton Peter Pond
George Rose (Barrister) William Vincent Humphry Repton
Eliab Harvey Sir George Henry Rose James Kenney
James Kennedy Nevil Maskelyne James Playfair
John Auldjo Thomas Morton (Shipbuilder) Charles Kemble
Sir John Vaughan (Judge) Henry Paget, Marquess of Anglesey Henry Holland (Cricketer)
Sir Henry Holland (Baronet) Mary Alcock Tom Walker (Cricketer)
Thomas Bradley (Physician) Henry Dundas Trotter Thomas Picton
Sir Charles Middleton William Henry Playfair John Palmer (The 2 Architects)
William Ludlam Thomas Ludlam John Pinch the Elder
George Harris, 1st Baron Edward Waring William Aubrey de Vere Beauclerk 9th Duke of St Albans
Isaac Milner Sir Henry Blackwood William Lovett
General Sir Edward Paget Colonel John Vaughan William Locker
William George Keith Elphinstone Sir William Parker Baronet of Harburn Charles Hutton
John Thomas ‘Antiquity’ Smith Thomas Grey Egerton

1st Earl of Wilton

William Allen (Royal Navy Officer)
Thomas Baldwin Nathaniel Plimer Sir Edward Berry
Charles Gordon Lennox 5th Duke of Richmond George Combe Henry Siddons
Angela Burdett-Coutts William Ellis (Painter) William Drummond of Logiealmond
William George Harris Gerrard Andrewes Berkeley Paget
John Palmer (postal Innovator) Thomas Ludlam Henry Hetherington
Sir Charles Bagot Edward Ellice Francis Douce
Sir Hector Munro Richard Harris Barham Andrew Meikle
William Anderson (Artist) William Hunter Cavendish 5th Duke of Devonshire William Stewart Rose
Harriet Murray John Hunter (Politician) John Thomas Serres
Joseph Antonio Emidy Joseph Hume Thomas Holcroft
Archibald Alison Abraham Rees Thomas Helmore
Colonel William Berkeley Thomas Hearne Richard Carlile
Julius Caesar Ibbetson George Howard, 6th Earl of Carlisle John Rennie
William Oxberry William Hornby William Holme Twentyman
Charles Howard 11th Duke of Norfolk Gerard Lake Sir Archibald Alison, 1st Baronet
Isaac Taylor Edward Howard-Gibbon Marquess of Stafford Granville Leveson-Gower
Robert Aspland George Harris 3rd Baron Harris Thomas Telford
George Phillip Manners Arthur Hill, 3rd Marquess of Downshire Daniel Gurney
Sir Peter Parker John Horsley Palmer Richard Watson (politician)
Joseph Farington Charles Fitzroy, Baron Southampton William Henry West Betty
Charles Stuart (British Army Officer) Marguerite Gardiner, Countess of Blessington Paul III Anton, Prince Esterházy
William Danby George Macartney Richard Payne Knight
Admiral Adam Duncan James George Smith Neill Sir Anthony Carlisle
John Hely-Hutchinson, 2nd Earl of Donoughmore Admiral Lord Hugh Seymour Richard Robert Madden
Joseph Milner Sidney Smith (wit) George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer
Henry Duncan John Nichols Thom Charles Gardiner, 1st Earl of Blessington
Uvedale Price James Foster Richard Colt Hoare
Richard Watson (Bishop) Francis Ingram-Seymour-Conway 2nd Marquess of Hertford Charles FitzRoy 3rd Baron Southampton
Duke of York Frederick Augustus Hanover Price Blackwood Benjamin Outram
Major General John Dalling John Thelwall Robert “Bobus” Percy Smith
John Carr (architect) James Archibald Stuart Roger Curtis
Sir Erasmus Gower Charles Pepys Earl of Cottenham Joseph Chitty
Henry Thoby Prinsep James Coutts Crawford Sir Charles Edward Grey
John Palmer (Commissary) Samuel Barrington William Gifford
John Richardson Henry Holland Thomas Harley
Emily Lennox, Duchess of Leinster Alexander Hood Charles Grey, 1st Earl Grey
John Wilson Croker Beaumont Hotham John Fane 11th Earl of Westmorland
George Johnston Henry Temple 2nd Viscount Palmerston Simon McGillivray
Colonel George Hanger Sir John McMahon William Babington
John Hoppner Sir Richard Onslow John Byng 1st Earl of Strafford
William Wilkins Daines Barrington John Bell (publisher)
Alexander Ball Lord Robert Seymour Jacob Philipp Hackert
John Cleave Hussey Vivian 1st Baron Vivian George Cowper 6th Earl Cowper
Edward Bouverie Pusey Dr William Pulteney Alison William Railton
James Mill Lucuis Curtis Henry Pigot
Hugh James Rose Sir John Easthope Thomas Starkie
John Prinsep Harriet Martineau Edward Gibbon
Richard Watson 4th Duke of Queensberry William Douglas Edward Jenner
James Gillray Molyneux Shuldham 1st Baron Shuldham Charles Catton the Younger
Henry Proctor (British Army Officer) James Stuart-Wortley-Mackenzie 1st Baron Wharncliffe Sir Thomas Brisbane
William Adam of Blair Adam Sir Edward Michael Pakenham Charles Bury 1st Earl of Charleville
John Pinch the Younger John Stuart Count of Maida Robert Hall
Hurrell Froude Olivia Serres Anne Horton Duchess of Cumberland and Strathearn
Sir Marc Brunel George Pryme General Sir John Bell
William Whewell Adam Ferguson of Raith William Beatty
Robert Linzee Richard Porson Edward O’Bryen
William Baillie (artist) John Romilly Edwin Chadwick
William Hay 17th Earl of Erroll Elizabeth Inchbald Maria Walpole
Edward Maltby Folliott Cornewall Edward James Eliot
James Perry (journalist) John Oxley General Sir Robert Arbuthnot
Sir Ralph Abercromby Hannah Cowley Thomas Kidd (classical scholar)
Admiral Sir Graham Moore Duke of Norfolk Henry Charles Howard Henry Dundas 1st Viscount Melville
Francis Leggatt Chantrey Sir Josias Rowley 1st Baronet Richard Grosvenor 1st Earl Grosvenor
Richard Colley Wellesley Edward Adolphus Seymour 12th Duke of Somerset James Henry Monk
Sir John Abercromby Sir George Colebrooke Francis Russell 5th Duke of Bedford
James Burton Thomas Morton (Playwright) John MacBride
George Mudie Sir William Hotham Charles Augustus Murray
Priscilla Fane Countess of Westmorland William Van Mildert Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Sir Gerard Noel 2nd Baronet Sir George Baker Henry Wellesley
William Gregory Albemarle Bertie John Rylands
Sir Arthur Paget George Murray 5th Earl of Dunmore Sir Thomas Munro 1st Baronet
Maurice Margarot Sir Charles Grey Robert James Carr
George Stephenson Bernard Edward Howard, 12th Duke of Norfolk Allan Cunningham
Henry Thynne 3rd Marquess of Bath William Hasledine Pepys George Percy 5th Duke of Northumberland
John Charles Ramsden Thomas Mounsey Cunningham John Nash
Thomas Charles Hope Joseph Gerrald Richard Howe 1st Earl Howe
William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck 3rd Duke of Portland William Pitt the Younger Henry Addington 1st Viscount Sidmouth
William Wyndham Grenville 1st Baron Grenville Spencer Perceval Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool
George Canning Frederick John Robinson 1st Viscount Goderich Arthur Wellesley 1st Duke of Wellington (Political Career)
Charles Grey 2nd Earl Grey William Lamb 2nd Viscount Melbourne Sir Robert Peel 2nd Baronet
Edward Troughton James Cecil 1st Marquess of Salisbury William Salter (artist)
Colonel Sempronius Streton James Lackington Duke of Argyll John Campbell 7th Duke
Charles Noel 1st Earl of Gainsborough Thomas Fortescue Kennedy Robert McQueen
Peregrine Maitland Harriet Fane Arbuthnot Duke of Marlborough George Spencer-Churchill 4th Duke
William Essington Richard Sheepshanks John Linnell
Daniel Rutherford Harry Walker (Cricketer) Thomas Egerton 2nd Earl of Wilton
William Heberden the Younger William Beresford 1st Baron Decies George Agar-Ellis 1st Baron Dover
Tattersalls Robert Jocelyn 3rd Earl of Roden George Stewart 8th Earl of Galloway
George FitzRoy 4th Duke of Grafton Lord Henry John Spencer Richard Grosvenor 2nd Marquess of Westminster
Admiral Sir George Campbell John Fane 10th Earl of Westmorland Phillip Parker King
Admiral Sir Robert Barlow Lady Diana Spencer James Edwards (Bookseller)
Charles Bennet 4th Earl of Tankerville Patrick Fraser Tytler William Handcock 1st Viscount Castlemaine
Lord Frederick Campbell George Leveson-Gower Marquis of Stafford Duke of Sutherland John Scott Earl of Eldon
John Blaquiere 1st Baron de Blaquiere Louisa (Lennox) Conolly Sir Harry Smith
Sir William Hamilton, 9th Baronet Sir Edward Crofton Laura Pulteney 1st Countess of Bath
Brownlow Bertie 5th Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven William Nelson 1st Earl Nelson George Child Villiers 5th Earl of Jersey
Frederick Howard 5th Earl of Carlisle Sir William Oglander 6th Baronet Joseph Bramah
George Cavendish 1st Earl of Burlington George Beresford 1st Marquess of Waterford William Henry Hunt
John Edwards-Vaughan Elizabeth (Gurney) Fry William Waldegrave 1st Baron Radstockv
George Gordon 9th Marquess Huntly William Mulready George Colman the Younger
Ralph Payne 1st Baron Lavington 5th Duke of Argyll John Campbell Charles Grant 1st Baron Glenelg
James Hutton George Byng 6th Viscount Torrington John Russell 6th Duke of Bedford
Sir Philip Durham Frederick Richard Lee Thomas Jervis
William Molesworth 8th Baronet William Cunnington William Beloe
Thomas Postlethwaite Edward Ellice Lady Charlotte Bury
John Adey Repton Sir Hugh Gough Henry Maudslay
Edward Bromhead Lord Charles FitzRoy (Politician) John Horne Tooke
Samuel Whitbread Sir Issac Coffin Matthew Boulton
Joshua Field William McGillivray Andrew Geddes
Edward Turner (chemist) George Lackington Francis Augustus Collier
Henry Beauchamp St John 13th Baron St John of Blesto Richard Taylor (editor) Henry Luttrell 2nd Earl of Carhampton
Derwent Coleridge Severus William Lynam Stretton William Vane 1st Duke of Cleveland
William Cobbett Arthur Phillip Major-General Robert Craufurd
Captain John (Jack) Willett Payne James Gregory George Peacock
Duke of Argyll George William Campbell 6th Duke Robert Scott Lauder Joseph Locke
George Montagu John Eliot Earl of St. Germans John Wheble
Algernon Percy 1st Earl Beverly Sir Richard Sutton

There will be many other notables coming, a full and changing list can be found here on the blog as I keep adding to it. The list so far is:

  • Victoria
  • Granville Sharp
  • William Paley
  • John Boydell
  • Viscount Robert Castlereagh
  • James Stirling
  • John MacBride (professor)
  • John Thomas Duckworth
  • David Dundas
  • Sir Hyde Parker
  • Sir Thomas Hardy
  • Thomas Hardy (Reformer)
  • Sir William Parker
  • William Cornwallis
  • Charles Cornwallis
  • Robert Emmet
  • William Taylor of Norwich
  • Sir John Herschel
  • Robert Owen
  • Jeremy Bentham
  • John Stuart Mill
  • Thomas Cochrane 10th Earl of Dundonald
  • Claire Clairmont
  • Fanny Imlay
  • Gilbert Imlay
  • William Godwin
  • William Hazlitt
  • Mary Wollstonecraft
  • James Edward Smith
  • Sir Joseph Banks
  • James Smithson
  • William Cowper
  • Wellington (the Military man)
  • Cuthbert Collingwood
  • Sydney Smith
  • Admiral Sir William Sydney Smith
  • Admiral Sir Joseph Sydney Yorke
  • William Howe
  • Viscount Sir Samuel Hood
  • Sir Samuel Hood
  • Thomas Babington Macaulay
  • Napoleon Bonaparte
  • General Banastre Tarleton
  • John Constable
  • Thomas Lawrence
  • Sir William Lawrence 1st Baronet
  • George Cruikshank
  • Thomas Gainsborough
  • Joseph Priestley
  • Horace Walpole
  • Thomas Rowlandson
  • William Blake
  • John Soane
  • Robert Smirke (architect)
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Robert Southey
  • Sir Walter Scott
  • Lord Elgin
  • William Windham
  • Madame de Stael
  • John Walker (inventor)(Natural Historian)(Lexicographer)
  • James Boswell
  • William Harrison Ainsworth
  • Thomas Cochrane
  • Warren Hastings
  • Edmund Burke
  • William Petty
  • Juana Maria de Los Dolores de Leon (Lady Smith)
  • Louis Philippe Joseph, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1785 as Duc d’ Orleans (1747-1793)
  • Louis Philippe, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1793 as Duc d’ Orleans (1773-1850)
  • John Bell
  • James Wyatt
  • William Pole-Tylney-Long-Wellesley
  • Lord FitzRoy Somerset, 1st Baron Raglan
  • Robert Smith, 1st Baron Carrington
  • James Watt
  • John Hunter (Royal Navy)
  • Joseph Pease
  • Richard Trevithick
  • Thomas Baillie (Royal Navy officer)
  • William Francis Patrick Napier
  • Charles James Napier
  • Sir Charles Bell
  • Donald Gregory
  • Richard Barnwell
  • Charles James Blomfield
  • William Carr Beresford 1st Viscount Beresford
  • Maria Hadfield
  • John Russell, 1st Earl Russell
  • George Brydges Rodney
  • Samuel Pepys Cockerell
  • Benjamin Robert Haydon
  • John Dalton
  • Joseph Lancaster
  • Samuel Whitbread (Politician)
  • Francis Augustus Collier
  • Humphry Davy
  • George Shillibeer
  • Samuel Hoare Jr.
  • Thomas Moore
  • Edward Dodwell
  • Archibald Norman McLeod
  • George Vancouver
  • Sir George Simpson
  • William Morgan (actuary)
  • Alexander Walker
  • George Templer
  • Thomas Landseer
  • Sir Robert Inglis
  • Lucia Elizabeth Vestris
  • John Vaughan 3rd Earl of Lisburne
  • Samuel Rogers
  • Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • John MacDonald of Garth
  • Sir Archibald Campbell
  • Maria Theresa Kemble
  • Thomas Muir of Huntershill
  • Thomas Fyshe Palmer
  • Samuel Palmer
  • William Skirving
  • Captain William Paget
  • Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Paget
  • E.A. Burney
  • Charles Burney
  • Lord Frederick Beauclerk
  • William Fullarton
  • Francis Jeffrey
  • Charles Simeon
  • Sir John Simeon
  • Thomas de Quincey
  • James Watson
  • Daniel O’Connell
  • Feargus O’Connor
  • Joseph Nollekens
  • Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster
  • Andrew Combe
  • Abram Combe
  • William Ellis
  • William A. F. Browne
  • Robert William Elliston
  • William Henry Murray
  • Daniel Terry
  • Joanna Baillie
  • Theodore Hook
  • Robert Scott Lauder
  • Chauncey Hare Townshend
  • Paul Sandby
  • Henry Paget 1st Earl of Uxbridge
  • Richard Hurd
  • Abel Heywood
  • George Holyoake
  • Charles Poulett Thomson
  • William Charles Keppel, 4th Earl of Albemarle
  • Thomas Coke, 1st Earl of Leicester
  • George Rennie
  • Elizabeth Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire
  • Frederick Hervey
  • Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Earl Granville
  • Sir Augustus William James Clifford
  • George Lamb (politician and Writer)
  • Francis Baring
  • Thomas Rees
  • John Jones
  • Sir James Edward Smith
  • John Evans
  • Maurice Berkeley, 1st Baron FitzHardinge
  • Henry FitzHardinge Berkeley
  • Grantley Berkeley
  • Craven Berkeley
  • George Cranfield-Berkeley
  • Sir George Beaumont, 7th Baronet
  • Joseph Mallord William Turner
  • Thomas Girtin
  • Dr. Thomas Monro
  • George Dance the Younger
  • William Daniell
  • Edward Thomas Daniell
  • Henry Monro
  • Henry Hunt
  • William Hone
  • James Wilson
  • Robert Taylor (Radical)
  • Benjamin West
  • John Varley
  • William Roscoe
  • Thomas Harrison (architect)
  • John Rennie the Younger
  • Sir Samuel Bentham
  • Thomas John Dibdin
  • Thomas Frognall Dibdin
  • George Soane
  • John Emery (English Actor)
  • Elizabeth Rebecca Edwin
  • Lawrence Holme Twentyman
  • Mary Ann Gibbon
  • Matthew Howard-Gibbon
  • Sir William Woods
  • Isaac Taylor of Ongar
  • Josiah Conder
  • Jacob Rey
  • John Foster
  • Olinthus Gilbert Gregory
  • Jane Taylor
  • John Wilson (Scottish writer)
  • Sir James Stephens
  • Ann Taylor (poet)
  • John Eyre
  • Thomas Noon Talfourd
  • Thomas Southwood Smith
  • Neil Arnott
  • James Kay-Shuttleworth
  • William Johnson Fox
  • Nassau William Senior
  • Elizabeth Fox, Baroness Holland
  • Walter Wilson
  • William James Erasmus Wilson
  • Sir William Pulteney, 5th Baronet
  • William Jessop
  • Thomas Campbell
  • Phillip Hardwick
  • Charles Harcourt Masters
  • Sir Peter Parker, 2nd Baronet
  • Thomas Taylour, 1st Marquess of Headfort
  • George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer
  • John Home
  • Frederick Edward Jones
  • John Stuart, 1st Marquess of Bute
  • William Stuart
  • Lady Louisa Stuart
  • James Lowther 1st Earl of Lonsdale
  • Charles Stuart, 1st Baron Stuart de Rothesay
  • Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 1st Earl of Minto
  • Andrew Blayney, 11th Baron Blayney
  • Walter Savage Landor
  • Sir George Staunton
  • William Gilpin
  • Henry Trollope
  • Henry Havelock
  • Nicholas Carlisle
  • William Nicholson
  • Sir George Seymour
  • Miles Atkinson
  • William Dealtry
  • Samuel Marsden
  • Thomas Perronet Thompson
  • Alexander Horn
  • John Ryland
  • James Mackintosh
  • Sir Richard Bickerton
  • Robert Corbet
  • Richard Cope (minister)
  • William Wordsworth
  • Elizabeth Barrett Browning
  • William Lyttelton
  • Francis Nicholson
  • Geroge Hay, 8th Marquess of Tweeddale
  • James Anderson of Hermiston
  • John Hookham Frere
  • Henry Vassall-Fox
  • George Richardson (Architect)
  • William Chambers (Architect)
  • James Stuart-Mackenzie
  • William Legge
  • George Cartwright
  • Anthony James Pye Molloy
  • James Gambier 1st Baron Gambier
  • William Wingfield
  • James Prinsep
  • Francis Rawdon-Hastings, 1st Marquess of Hastings
  • Sir Charles Knowles
  • William Bligh
  • Sophia Campbell (Palmer)
  • Robert Campbell
  • Francis Grose
  • John Macarthur
  • George Ellis
  • John Gibson Lockhart
  • William Stevens
  • William Adam
  • John Thomas Troy
  • Sir Robert Dallas
  • Thomas Hardwick
  • Esther Abrahams
  • William Paterson (explorer)
  • Joseph Foveaux
  • Henry Fulton
  • Simon McTavish
  • Colin Robertson
  • William McMahon
  • William Behnes
  • Rowland Hill 1st Viscount Hill
  • John Peter Gandy
  • William Crotch
  • Samuel Wesley
  • Henry Vincent
  • William Cathcart, 1st Earl Cathcart
  • Thomas de Grey, 2nd Earl de Grey
  • John Henry Newman
  • John Keble
  • Sir William Molesworth 8th Baronet
  • Samuel Pym
  • Henry Lambert
  • Nesbit Willoughby
  • William Palmer
  • William Innell Clement
  • Henry John Rose
  • John Austin (legal philosopher)
  • Thomas Dunham Whitaker
  • Adam Clarke
  • Marchioness of Hertford, Maria Emilia Fagnani
  • Charles Douglas, 6th Marquess of Queensberry
  • Francis Douglas, 8th Earl of Wemyss
  • Edward Thurlow 1st Baron Thurlow
  • Sir George Prevost
  • Sir Isaac Brock
  • John Thomas Bigge
  • John Creighton 1st Earl Erne
  • Dr. Robert Wardell
  • James Dunlop
  • Admiral Sir Charles Adam
  • Catherine Wellesley Duchess of Wellington
  • Robert Ross
  • Henry Prittie 1st Baron Dunalley
  • Henry Prittie 2nd Baron Dunalley
  • Robert Cuninghame 1st Baron Rossmore
  • Sir Sames Craig
  • Henry Edward Fox
  • Hudson Lowe
  • John Clayton
  • Samuel Horsley
  • James Wilmot
  • Samuel Hood Linzee
  • John Gore
  • George Atwood
  • Stephen Weston (antiquary)
  • Walter Whiter
  • Joseph Robertson
  • Samuel Parr
  • Joseph Goodall
  • Gilbert Wakefield
  • Robert Mann (Royal Navy Officer)
  • William Otter
  • Joseph Warton
  • George Pretyman Tomline
  • William Enfield
  • Henry Bathurst (bishop)
  • William Turner (Unitarian minister)
  • Edward Craggs-Eliot 1st Baron Eliot
  • Alexander Abercromby
  • Geroge Abercromby, 2nd Baron Abercromby
  • James Abercromby, 1st Baron Dunfermline
  • Alexander Abercromby (British Army Officer)
  • Robert Merry
  • John Moore (physician)
  • Sir Richard Hughes
  • William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland
  • John Raphael Smith
  • Daniel Asher Alexander
  • Henry Weekes
  • Thomas Stothard
  • Charles Manners-Sutton
  • Sir Richard Westmacott
  • Decimus Burton
  • James Pennethorne
  • James Haliburton
  • Joseph George Holman
  • Hugh Palliser
  • Thomas Louis
  • Willoughby Thomas Lake
  • Henry Hotham
  • John Holloway
  • Sir Richard Strachan
  • Edward Thornbrough
  • Benjamin Hawes
  • Charles Wetherell
  • John Scott Russell
  • William Horsley
  • Henry Noel, 6th Earl of Gainsborough
  • James Harris 1st Earl of Malmesbury
  • Henry Richard Charles Wellesley 1st Earl of Cowley
  • William O’Bryen Drury
  • Sir John Borlase Warren
  • John Parker 1st Earl of Morley
  • John Murray 4th Earl of Dunmore
  • Alexander Murray 6th Earl of Dunmore
  • John Munro 9th of Teaninich
  • John Wilkes
  • Henry George Grey 3rd Earl Grey
  • John Lambton 1st Earl of Durham
  • Matthew Murray
  • William Losh
  • John Vaughan
  • John Metcalf
  • Henry Both
  • James Hogg
  • Allan Cunningham (botanist)
  • Peter Miller Cunningham
  • Robert Hartley Cromek
  • Sir David Wilkie
  • Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath
  • William Feilding, 7th Earl of Denbigh
  • Josceline Percy (Royal Navy Officer)
  • William Henry Percy
  • Thomas Dundas 1st Baron Dundas
  • William Fitzwilliam 4th Earl Fitzwilliam
  • Augustus Charles Pugin
  • Frederick Crace
  • James Morgan
  • Edward Blore
  • Alexander Monro
  • Joseph Galloway
  • Richard Curzon-Howe
  • Stephen Groombridge
  • William Simms
  • Sir James South
  • George Nugent 1st Marquess of Westmeath
  • James Gascoyne-Cecil 2nd Marquess of Salisbury
  • Sir Frederic Adam
  • Sir Henry Askew
  • Sir Andrew Francis Barnard
  • Sir Henry Wyndham
  • William Stretton
  • Eyre Massey
  • Richard Handcock 2nd Baron Castlemaine
  • John Flaxman
  • Sir George Grey 1st Baronet
  • Hugh Cloberry Christian
  • Henry Harvey
  • William Young
  • Andrew Snape Douglas
  • George Burlton
  • Sir John Hill
  • Sir Henry Raeburn
  • Sir Colin Campbell/Cailean Mor
  • Henry Fane
  • Lord Charles Spencer
  • Lady Elizabeth Spencer
  • Henry Ellis 2nd Viscount Clifden
  • Edward Nares
  • Cropley Ashley-Cooper 6th Earl of Shaftesbury
  • Lord Francis Almeric Spencer
  • George Biddell Airy
  • Charles Babbage
  • Richard Whately
  • Thomas Carlyle
  • Robert Grosvenor, 1st Baron Ebury
  • Edward Smith-Stanley, 12th Earl of Derby
  • William Heberden the Elder
  • Marcus Beresford
  • John Julius Angerstein
  • Charles Pierrepont, 1st Earl Manvers
  • Robert Jocelyn, 2nd Earl of Roden
  • John Stewart 7th Earl of Galloway
  • William Stewart (1774-1827)
  • William Porden
  • William Burn
  • Sarah Fane, Countess of Westmorland
  • John Ponsonby 4th Earl of Bessborough
  • Philip Gidley King
  • Anna Josepha King
  • Matthew Flinders
  • John Septimus Roe
  • Vice-Admiral Robert FitzRoy
  • Charles Darwin
  • Emma Crewe
  • Elizabeth Templetown
  • Ricahrd Gough (antiquarian)
  • Henry Grey Bennet
  • James Tytler
  • Alexander Fraser Tytler
  • George Thomson
  • William Power Keating Trench 1st Earl of Clancarty
  • George Townshend 1st marquess Townshend
  • John Campbell 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane
  • Elilzabeth Leveson-Gower Duchess of Sutherland
  • Nathan Rothschild
  • Charles Cavendish Fulke Greville
  • Patrick Sellar
  • Francis (Leveson-Gower) Egerton 1st Earl of Ellesmere
  • William Scott 1st Baron Stowell
  • Thomas Erskine 1st Baron Erskine
  • Thomas Thynne 1st Marquess of Bath
  • Thomas Conolly
  • Edward Michael (Pakenham) Conolly
  • Benjamin D’Urban
  • Robert Hamilton (ecnomist)
  • Thomas Hamilton (writer)
  • Augustus De Morgan
  • Sir James Pulteney 7th Baronet
  • Thomas Colyear 4th Earl of Portmore
  • Albemarle Bertie 9th Earl of Lindsey
  • Thomas Nelson 2nd Earl Nelson
  • Charlotte Hood 3rd Duchess of Bronte
  • Francis Villiers Countess of Jersey
  • John Campbell 1st Baron Cawdor
  • Henry Howard (priest)
  • Joseph Clement
  • Arthur Woolf
  • Charles Monck 1st Viscount Monck
  • Henry Beresford 2nd Marquess of Waterford
  • Lord John Beresford
  • Sir John Beresford 1st Baronet
  • Lord George Thomas Beresford
  • Denis Pack
  • John Gurney
  • Joseph Fry(tea merchant)
  • Stephen Grellet
  • John James Waldegrave 6th Earl Waldegrave
  • Charles Gordon 10th Marquess of Huntly
  • Charles Compton Cavendish 1st Baron Chesham
  • Lord Frederick Gordon-Hallyburton
  • Richard Monckton Milnes 1st Baron Houghton
  • Elizabeth Gunning, 1 Baroness of Hamilton of Hameldon
  • Charles Grant (British East India Company)
  • Sir Robert Grant
  • Charles Lyell
  • Richard Kirwan
  • William Charles Wells
  • Patrick Matthew
  • Major-General Lord George Russell
  • Martha Bruce Countess of Elgin and Kincardine
  • William Brown
  • William Lechmere
  • Thomas Lee
  • Thomas Sidney Cooper
  • George Hamilton-Gordon 4th Earl of Aberdeen
  • William Ewart Gladstone
  • Charles Buller
  • George Grote
  • John Arthur Roebuck
  • John Roebuck
  • Thomas Dampier
  • Samuel Butler
  • George Edmund Byron Bettesworth
  • Eliza Courtney
  • General Robert Ellice
  • George Sackville-West 5th Earl De la Warr
  • John Britton (antiquary)
  • Henry Hardinge 1st Viscount Hardinge
  • James Nasmyth
  • Jesse Ramsden
  • Sir Joseph Whitworth
  • John Penn
  • Richard Roberts
  • David Napier
  • George Green
  • Charles Augustus FitzRoy
  • Richard Beadon
  • Lloyd Kenyon
  • William Tooke
  • Richard Grenville-Temple 2nd Earl Temple
  • Sir Thomas Pasley
  • Sir Thomas Graves
  • Alexander Cochrane
  • Guy Carleton 1st Baron Dorchester
  • Phillip Cosby
  • James Wallace
  • Matthew Robinson Boulton
  • Francis Eginton
  • James Keir
  • John Wilkinson
  • Simon Goodrich
  • William Murdoch
  • William Fordyce Mavor
  • Edward Pelham Brenton
  • St Andrew St John 14th Baron St John of Blesto
  • John St John 12th Baron St John of Blesto
  • John Taylor (Unitarian hymn writer)
  • Alexander Tilloch
  • Jonathan Boucher
  • John Luttrell-Olmius 3rd Earl of Carhampton
  • W.M. Praed
  • John Moultrie
  • William Sidney Walker
  • Charles Austin
  • Charles Blomfield
  • Frederick Denison Maurice
  • Richard Arden 3rd Baron Alvanley
  • John Cartwright (political reformer)
  • Thomas Curson Hansard
  • William Benbow
  • Thomas Robert Malthus
  • John Claudius Loudon
  • Thomas Townshend 1st Viscount Sydney
  • John Montagu 5th Earl of Sandwich
  • Lachlan Macquarie
  • William Dawes
  • Watkin Tench
  • Charles Craufurd
  • John Whitelocke
  • James Shaw Kennedy
  • John Colborne, 1st Baron Seaton
  • Robert Henley 2nd Earl of Northington
  • Thomas Brown (philosopher)
  • George Gilbert Scott
  • George Villers 4th Earl of Jersey
  • Charles Vignoles
  • Thomas Brassey
  • Charles Pasley
  • William Mackenzie
  • Alan Gardner
  • William Ward
  • John Nichols
  • John Higton
  • Peter Burrell 1st Baron Gwydyr
  • George Ashburnham 3rd Earl of Ashburnham
  • William Henry Percy
  • Hugh Percy (bishop)

The Dukes

  • Duke of Grafton, Augustus Henry FitzRoy, 3rd Duke 1735-1811
  • Duke of Gordon, Alexander Gordon 4th Duke 1743-1827
  • Duke of Northumberland, Hugh Percy 1742-1817
  • Duke of Northumberland, Algernon Percy 1792-1865
  • Duke of Hamilton, Archibald Hamilton
  • Duke of Hamilton, Alexander Hamilton
  • Duke of Norfolk, Henry Howard 13th Duke
  • Duke of Marlborough George Spencer-Churchill 5th Duke
  • Duke of Marlborough George Spencer-Churchill 6th Duke
  • Duke of Dorset John Sackville 3rd Duke
  • Duke of Dorset George Sackville 4th Duke
  • Duke of Atholl John Murray 4th Duke
  • Duke of Bridgewater Francis Egerton 3rd Duke
  • Duke of Sutherland George Sutherland-Leveson-Gower 2nd Duke
  • Duke of Gordon George Duncan Gordon 5th Duke
  • Duke of Montrose James Graham 3rd Duke
  • Duke of Bedford Francis Russell 7th Duke
  • Duke of Cleveland Henry Vane 2nd Duke
  • Duke of Cleveland William Vane 3rd Duke
  • Duke of Cleveland Harry Powlett 4th Duke
  • Duchess of Gordon Jane Gordon

The Royals

  • Ernest Augustus 1 of Hanover
  • Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld

The Dandy Club

  •         Beau Brummell
  •         William Arden, 2nd Baron Alvanley

Patronesses of Almacks

  •         Emily Lamb, Lady Cowper
  •         Amelia Stewart, Viscountess Castlereagh
  •         Sarah Villiers, Countess of Jersey
  •         Maria Molyneux, Countess of Sefton
  •         Dorothea Lieven, Countess de Lieven, wife of the Russian Ambassador
  •         Countess Esterhazy, wife of the Austrian Ambassador

Regency Business

  • The Morning Post
  • Rundell and Bridge
  • Lackington-Temple of Muses
  • Almack’s
  • Burlington Arcade

If there are any requests for personalities to be added to the list, just let us know in the comments section

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Sir Richard Sutton
31 July 1733 – 10 January 1802

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Richard Sutton

He was the son of Sir Robert Sutton and Judith Tichborne.

He entered Parliament in 1768 as member for St. Albans which he represented until 1780. (Somewhere between 1768 and 1772 he served asUnder Secretary of State.) In September 1780, he was simultaneously elected to Aldborough and to Sandwich. He chose to represent the latter until 1784, thus necessitating a by-election for the former constituency.

In 1784, he became a representative for Boroughbridge with the Irish peer Viscount Palmerston, which he represented until 1796. He served a total of 28 years in Parliament.

He married three times: 1st to Susan Crespigny, 2nd to Anne Williams, daughter of William Peere Williams esq., and 3rd to Margaret Porter. He and his second wife, Anne, had at least seven children: their eldest son was John Sutton, who married Sophia Frances Chaplin, daughter of Charles Chaplin, esq., of Tathwell, Lincolnshire. John died in the lifetime of his father, leaving a son:

    • Sir Richard Sutton, 2nd Baronet who succeeded his grandfather to the baronetcy, aged 4.

The baronetcy was granted in 1772, after Sutton had retired from the office of Under Secretary of State.

Richard was a great-grandson of Henry Sutton, younger brother of Robert Sutton, 1st Lord Lexington (which peerage became extinct in 1723). The Sutton baronets were thus distantly related to the dukes of Rutland, who were descended from the marriage of the 3rd duke to the Hon. Bridget Sutton, heiress of Robert Sutton, 2nd Baron Lexinton.

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