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Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

George Montagu
12 December 1750 – 24 December 1829

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George Montagu

In 1763 Montagu entered the Royal Academy at Portsmouth, and was then appointed to HMS Preston with Captain Alan Gardner (afterwards Admiral Lord Gardner), going out to the Jamaica station with the flag of Rear Admiral William Parry. He served in Preston for three years, before following Captain Gardner to HMS Levant. He finally returned to England in 1770.

He passed his lieutenant’s examination on 2 October 1770, and on 14 January 1771 was appointed lieutenant of HMS Marlborough. In February he was moved into HMS Captain, going out to North America as the flagship of his father. On 9 April 1773 he was appointed commander in the 18 gun sloop HMS Kingfisher, and on 15 April 1774 (Pay-book of the Fowey) he was posted to HMS Fowey. In her he continued on the North American station during the early years of the war of independence, actively co-operating with the army in the embarkation at Boston in March, and in the reduction of New York in October 1776.

Shortly after he returned to England in bad health. From 1777 to 1779 he commanded HMS Romney, as flag captain to his father at Newfoundland. On his return he was appointed to the 32-gun frigate HMS Pearl, which when cruising near the Azores in 1779, captured the Spanish frigate Santa Monica of equal force. In December Pearl sailed with the fleet under Sir George Rodney, and assisted in the capture of the Caracas convoy; but having sprung her foremast, was ordered home with the prizes. She was afterwards sent out to North America, and in 1780, while on a cruise off the Bermudas, captured the Espérance, a frigate-built privateer of 32 guns. In the battle of Cape Henry, in 1781, she acted as repeating frigate. She was not with the fleet during the battle of the Chesapeake on 5 September, but joined it, still off Cape Henry, on the 14th, and was left to keep watch on the movements of the French till the 25th, when she sailed for New York. On 19 October she sailed again with the fleet, and on the 23rd was stationed ahead as a look-out. She returned to England in 1782.

During the Spanish Armament of 1790 Montagu was appointed to HMS Hector (74) and went out to the Leeward Islands in 1793 with Rear Admiral Gardner, and thence to Jamaica, to convoy the homeward-bound trade. He was afterwards with the squadron in the Downs, under the orders of Rear Admiral MacBride, until 12 April 1794, when he was promoted to the rank of Rear Admiral, and, hoisting his flag in the Hector, joined the grand fleet under Lord Howe.

On 4 May he was detached, with a squadron of six ships of the line, to convoy a large fleet of merchant ships as far as Cape Finisterre. His further orders were to cruise to the westward till 20 May, in the hope of meeting the French provision convoy daily expected from America. The convoy, however, did not arrive at that time, and Montagu, after making several important captures, returned to Plymouth on 30 May. He had extended his cruise for several days beyond the prescribed limit, but had not been able to communicate with Howe. On 2 June he received orders from the admiralty to put to sea again with every available ship, and to cruise off Brest in order to intercept the French provision fleet. On the 3rd the Audacious came in with news of the partial action of 28 May; but Montagu, having no other orders, put to sea on 4 June with nine ships of the line. On the evening of the 8th he chased a French squadron of eight ships into Brest, and at daybreak on the 9th found a French fleet of nineteen ships of the line a few miles to the westward of him. Though several of these were under jurymasts, or in tow of others, they all appeared capable of defending themselves, and fourteen of them seemed to be ordinarily effective. Of Howe’s success Montagu had no information. All he could hope was that by stretching to the southward, with a northerly wind, he might tempt the French so far to leeward of their port that Howe, if following them up, might be able to secure them. The French commander, Villaret, however, was not inclined to run such a risk, and, after a slight demonstration of chasing him, resumed his course and steered for Brest, while Montagu, after looking for Howe to the north-west, and failing to find him, bore away for the Channel, and on the 12th anchored in Cawsand Bay.

Howe and the Admiralty fully approved of Montagu’s conduct; and when, in bad health, rendered worse by the shock of his brother’s death during the battle, he applied for permission to resign his command, they both expressed their regret and a hope that his absence might be short.

On 1 June 1795 he was promoted to Vice Admiral, and in March 1799 he was offered the command at the Nore, which he declined, as beneath his rank. In April 1800 Lord St. Vincent offered him the post of second in command in the Channel; but other officers were appointed by the admiralty, and there was no vacancy. On 1 January 1801 he was made admiral; but when shortly afterwards he applied for a command, St. Vincent, who had become first lord of the admiralty, replied that he had learned there was “an insuperable bar” to his “being employed in any way”. He refused to say what the bar was; but it would appear to have been some misunderstanding of his conduct in 1794, as it gave way on a perusal of the official letters which Montagu had received at the time, and in 1803 he was appointed Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth.

He held this post for five and a half years, and in 1810 was presented with “a superb piece of plate” as “a tribute of respect and esteem” by the captains who had fitted out at Portsmouth during his command. In 1815 he was nominated a G.C.B., but had no service after the peace. He died on 24 December 1829.

In 1783 Montagu married his first cousin, Charlotte, the daughter and co-heiress of George Wroughton of Wilcot, Wiltshire, and had a daughter and four sons. The eldest son, George, adopted the name of Wroughton in 1826, and died a lieutenant-colonel in the army. The second, John William, died an admiral on the retired list; the third, James, was also a retired admiral at his death; the fourth, Edward, was in holy orders. His daughter, Georgiana, married Admiral Sir John Gore.

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Joseph Locke
9 August 1805 – 18 September 1860

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Joseph Locke

Locke was born in Attercliffe, Sheffield in Yorkshire, moving to nearby Barnsley when he was five. By the age of 17, Joseph had already served an apprenticeship under William Stobart at Pelaw, on the south bank of the Tyne, and under his own father, William. He was an experienced mining engineer, able to survey, sink shafts, to construct railways, tunnels and stationary engines. Joseph’s father had been a manager at Wallbottle colliery on Tyneside when George Stephenson was a fireman there. In 1823, when Joseph was 17, Stephenson was involved with planning the Stockton and Darlington Railway. He and his son Robert Stephenson visited William Locke and his son at Barnsley and it was arranged that Joseph would go to work for the Stephensons. The Stephensons established a locomotive works near Forth Street, Newcastle upon Tyne, to manufacture locomotives for the new railway. Joseph Locke, despite his youth, soon established a position of authority. He and Robert Stephenson became close friends, but their friendship was interrupted, in 1824, by Robert leaving to work in Peru for three years.

George Stephenson carried out the original survey of the line of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, but this was found to be flawed, and the line was re-surveyed by a talented young engineer, Charles Vignoles. Joseph Locke was asked by the directors to carry out another survey of the proposed tunnel works and produce a report. The report was highly critical of the work already done, which reflected badly on Stephenson. Stephenson was furious and henceforth relations between the two men were strained, although Locke continued to be employed by Stephenson, probably because the latter recognised his worth. Despite the many criticisms of Stephenson’s work, when the bill for the new line was finally passed, in 1826, Stephenson was appointed as engineer and he appointed Joseph Locke as his assistant to work alongside Vignoles, who was the other assistant. However, a clash of personalities between Stephenson and Vignoles led to the latter resigning, leaving Locke as the sole assistant engineer. Locke took over responsibility for the western half of the line. One of the major obstacles to be overcome was Chat Moss, a large bog that had to be crossed. Although, Stephenson usually gets the credit for this feat, it is believed that it was Locke who suggested the correct method for crossing the bog.

Whilst the line was being built, the directors were trying to decide whether to use standing engines or locomotives to propel the trains. Robert Stephenson and Joseph Locke were convinced that locomotives were vastly superior, and in March 1829 the two men wrote a report demonstrating the superiority of locomotives when used on a busy railway. The report led to the decision by the directors to hold an open trial to find the best locomotive. This was the Rainhill Trials, which were run in October 1829, and were won by “Rocket”.

When the line was finally opened in 1830, it was planned for a procession of eight trains to travel from Liverpool to Manchester and back. George Stephenson drove the leading locomotive “Northumbrian” and Joseph Locke drove “Rocket”. The day was marred by the death of William Huskisson, the Member of Parliament for Liverpool, who was struck and killed by “Rocket”.

In 1829 Locke was George Stephenson’s assistant, given the job of surveying the route for the Grand Junction Railway. This new railway was to join Newton-le-Willows on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway with Warrington and then on to Birmingham via Crewe, Stafford and Wolverhampton, a total of 80 miles. During the construction of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, Stephenson had shown a lack of ability in organising major civil engineering projects. On the other hand Locke’s ability to manage complex projects was well known. The directors of the new railway decided on a compromise whereby Locke was made responsible for the northern half of the line and Stephenson was made responsible for the southern half. However Stephenson’s administrative inefficiency soon became apparent, whereas Locke estimated the costs for his section of the line so meticulously and speedily, that he had all of the contracts signed for his section of the line before a single one had been signed for Stephenson’s section. The railway company lost patience with Stephenson, but tried to compromise by making both men joint-engineers. Stephenson’s pride would not let him accept this, and so he resigned from the project. By autumn of 1835 Locke had become chief engineer for the whole of the line. This caused a rift between the two men, and strained relations between Locke and Robert Stephenson. Up to this point, Locke had always been under George Stephenson’s shadow. From then on, he would be his own man, and stand or fall by his own achievements.

The line was opened on 4 July 1837.

Locke’s route avoided as far as possible major civil engineering works. The main one was the Dutton Viaduct which crosses the River Weaver and the Weaver Navigation between the villages of Dutton and Acton Bridge in Cheshire. The viaduct consists of 20 arches with spans of 20 yards.

An important feature of the new railway was the use of double-headed (dumb-bell) wrought-iron rail supported on timber sleepers at 2 ft 6 in intervals. It was intended that when the rails became worn they could be turned over to use the other surface, but in practice it was found that the chairs into which the rails were keyed caused wear to the bottom surface so that it became uneven. However this was still an improvement on the fish-bellied, wrought-iron rails still being used by Robert Stephenson on the London and Birmingham Railway.

Locke was more careful than Stephenson to get value for his employers’ money. For the Penkridge Viaduct Stephenson had obtained a tender of £26,000. After Locke took over, he gave the potential contractor better information and agreed a price of only £6,000. Locke also tried to avoid tunnels because in those days tunnels often took longer and cost more than planned. The Stephensons regarded 1 in 330 as the maximum slope that an engine could manage and Robert Stephenson achieved this on the London and Birmingham Railway by using seven tunnels which added both cost and delay. Locke avoided tunnels almost completely on the Grand Junction but exceeded the slope limit for six miles south of Crewe.

Proof of Locke’s ability to estimate costs accurately is given by the fact that the construction of the Grand Junction line cost £18,846 per mile as against Locke’s estimate of £17,000. This is amazingly accurate compared with the estimated costs for the London and Birmingham Railway (Robert Stephenson) and the Great Western Railway (Brunel).

Locke also divided the project into a few large sections rather than many small ones. This allowed him to work closely with his contractors to develop the best methods, overcome problems and personally gain practical experience of the building process and of the contractors themselves. He used the contractors who worked well with him, especially Thomas Brassey and William Mackenzie, on many other projects. Everyone gained from this cooperative approach whereas Brunel’s more adversarial approach eventually made it hard for him to get anyone to work for him.

In 1834 Locke married Phoebe McCreery, with whom he adopted a child. He was elected to the Royal Society in 1838.

A significant difference between the surveying methods of George Stephenson and Joseph Locke was that, because Stephenson had started his career at a time when locomotives had little power to overcome excessive gradients, he avoided such gradients at all costs, often adding many miles to the line of the route, whereas Locke had more confidence in the ability of modern locomotives to climb these gradients. An example of this was the Lancaster and Carlisle Railway, which had to cope with the barrier of the Lake District mountains. In 1839 Stephenson proposed a circuitous route that avoided the Lake District by going all the way round Morecambe Bay and West Cumberland, claiming: ‘This is the only practicable line from Liverpool to Carlisle. The making of a railway across Shap Fell is out of the question.’ The directors rejected his route and chose the one proposed by Joseph Locke, one that used steep gradients and passed over Shap Fell. The line was completed by Locke and was a success.

The difference of opinion between Locke and George Stephenson over the choice of route for the Lancaster and Carlisle Railway illustrates a difference in philosophy between the two men regarding the way to build a railway. Both George and Robert Stephenson were prepared to go to great lengths to avoid steep gradients that would tax the locomotives of the day, even if this meant choosing a circuitous route that added on extra miles. Locke, on the other hand, believed that they underestimated the power of the latest locomotives and that the shortest practicable route should be chosen, even if it involved some steep gradients. His reasoning was that by avoiding long routes and tunneling, the line could be finished more quickly, with less capital costs, and could start earning revenue sooner. This became known as the ‘up and over’ school of engineering. Locke took a similar approach in planning the Caledonian Railway, from Carlisle to Glasgow. In both railways he introduced gradients of 1 in 75, which severely taxed fully laden locomotives. Even as more powerful locomotives were introduced, the trains that they pulled became heavier. It may therefore be the case that Locke, although his arguments carried the day, was not entirely right in his reasoning.

Locke was subsequently appointed to build a railway line from Manchester to Sheffield, replacing Charles Vignoles as chief engineer, after the latter had been beset by misfortunes and financial difficulties. The project included the three-mile Woodhead Tunnel, and the line opened, after many delays, on 23 December 1845. The building of the line required over a thousand navvies and cost the lives of thirty-two of them, seriously injuring 140 others. The Woodhead Tunnel was such a difficult undertaking that George Stephenson claimed that it could not be done, declaring that he would eat the first locomotive that got through the tunnel. It was estimated that the mortality amongst the navvies at the Woodhead Tunnel was just over 3 per cent, whereas the mortality amongst soldiers at the Battle of Waterloo was only 2.11 per cent.

In the north, Locke also designed the Lancaster and Preston Junction Railway; the Glasgow, Paisley and Greenock Railway; and the Caledonian Railway from Carlisle to Glasgow and Edinburgh.

In the south, he worked on the London and Southampton Railway, later called the London and South Western Railway, designing, among other structures, Richmond Railway Bridge (1848, since replaced), and Barnes Bridge (1849), both across the River Thames, tunnels at Micheldever, and the 12-arch Quay Street viaduct and the 16-arch Cams Hill viaduct, both in Fareham (1848).

He was actively involved in planning and building many railways in Europe, including the Le Havre, Rouen, Paris rail link, the Barcelona to Mataró line and the Dutch Rhenish Railway. He was present in Paris when the Versailles train crash occurred in 1842, and produced a statement concerning the facts for General Charles Pasley of the Railway Inspectorate. He also experienced a catastrophic failure of one of his viaducts built on the new Paris-Le Havre link. . The viaduct was of stone and brick at Barentin near Rouen, and was the longest and highest on the line. It was 108 feet high, and consisted of 27 arches, each 50 feet wide, with a total length of over 1600 feet. A boy hauling ballast for the line up an adjoining hillside early that morning (about 6.00 am) saw one arch (the fifth on the Rouen side) collapse, and the rest followed suit. Fortunately, no one was killed, although several workmen were injured in a mill below the structure. Locke attributed the catastrophic failure to frost action on the new lime cement, and premature off-centre loading of the viaduct with ballast. It was rebuilt at Thomas Brassey’s cost, and survives to the present. Having pioneered many new lines in France, Locke also helped establish the first locomotive works in the country.

Distinctive features of Locke’s railway works were economy, the use of masonry bridges wherever possible and the absence of tunnels. An illustration of this is that there is no tunnel between Birmingham and Glasgow.

Locke and Robert Stephenson had been good friends at the beginning of their careers, but their friendship had been marred by Locke’s falling out with Robert’s father. It seems that Robert felt loyalty to his father required that he should take his side. It is significant that after the death of George Stephenson in August 1848, the friendship of the two men was revived. When Robert Stephenson died in October 1859, Joseph Locke was a pallbearer at his funeral. Locke is reported to have referred to Robert as ‘the friend of my youth, the companion of my ripening years, and a competitor in the race of life’. Locke was also on friendly terms with his other engineering rival, Isambard Kingdom Brunel.

In 1845, Locke and Stephenson were both called to give evidence before two committees. In April a House of Commons Select Committee was investigating the atmospheric railway system proposed by Brunel. Brunel and Vignoles spoke in support of the system, whilst Locke and Stephenson spoke against it. The latter two were to be proved right in the long run. In August the two gave evidence before the Gauge Commissioners who were trying to arrive at a standard gauge for the whole country. Brunel spoke in favour of the 7 ft gauge he was using on the Great Western Railway. Locke and Stephenson spoke in favour of the 4 ft 8½in gauge that they had used on several lines. The latter two won the day and their gauge was adopted as the standard.

Locke served as President of the Institution of Civil Engineers in between December 1857 and December 1859.

Locke also served as Member of Parliament for Honiton in Devon from 1847.

Locke died in 1860, apparently from appendicitis, whilst on a shooting holiday. He is buried in London’s Kensal Green Cemetery.

Locke Park in Barnsley was dedicated to his memory by his wife Phoebe in 1862. It features a statue of Locke plus a folly, ‘Locke Tower’.

Locke’s greatest legacy is the modern day West Coast Main Line (WCML), which was formed by the joining of the Caledonian, Lancaster & Carlisle, Grand Junction railways to Robert Stephenson’s London & Birmingham Railway. As a result, around three quarters of the WCML’s route was planned and engineered by Locke.

Beggars Can’t Be Choosier Reviewed.

Beggars Can’t be Choosier BeggarsCover-2014-07-19-09-43.jpg was reviewed again today. Another fantastic Review and I hope you can go to this webpage The_Review_Group__Beggars_Can_t_be_Choosier_by_D_W_Wilkin_-_A_Review_by_Linda_Root_-2014-07-19-09-43.jpg to see it. I am even giving away a digital copy of Beggars to one of those who stop by and enters the drawing there.

The Review is a website that reviews Historical Novels and my book was selected to be reviewed by my not so near neighbor, Linda Root, who I met on the FaceBook various writing forums and then later found she lived on the other side of the mountain (about 1+ hours away). We have never met, but we might be the closest in distance of any other writer of the hundreds I have met. Linda writes Historicals and she chose to tackle Beggars. A genre that she hasn’t touched since college, and Linda has now been out of college long enough to have had a career and retire.

Her books include: 41SLBhKWBKL-2014-07-19-09-43.jpgMidwife’s Secret I: The mystery of the Hidden Princess and 51Ei-Ktwt7L-2014-07-19-09-43.jpg The First Marie and the Queen of Scots

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Robert Scott Lauder
25 June 1803 – 21 April 1869

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Robert Scott Lauder

Lauder was born at Silvermills, Edinburgh, the third son of John Lauder of Silvermills, Burgess of Edinburgh and proprietor of the tannery at Silvermills, by his wife Helen Tait. After attending the Royal High School he went to London, where his eldest brother William was engaged in the family business.

He returned to Edinburgh about 1826 and was elected one of the original members of the Royal Scottish Academy in 1830. In 1833 at St.Cuthberts in Edinburgh he married Isabella Ramsay Thomson and they then went abroad, accompanied by his younger artist-brother, James Eckford Lauder. Robert studied for some years in Rome, Florence, Bologna, Venice and Munich.

Lauder returned to London in 1838 where he lived for several years, where his three children – Isabella, John, and Robert, were baptised at St.Thomas’s Church, Southwark. Whilst in London he exhibited at the Royal Academy and competed in the Westminster Hall competition of 1847, sending his Christ walking on the Sea, which was subsequently purchased by Lady Angela Burdett-Coutts, 1st Baroness Burdett-Coutts. He became the first president of the short-lived National Institution of Fine Arts and also exhibited there.

He later removed back to Edinburgh in 1849 where both his sons — Robert Scott Lauder, who became a physician, and John Thomson Lauder — attended the Edinburgh Academy. Sir Walter Scott’s novels provided him with subjects for many of his most successful historical paintings. About 1860 he suffered a paralytic stroke and did not practice after 1861. He died at Edinburgh from a bout of bronchitis on 21 April 1869, still paralysed. He is buried in Warriston Cemetery in Edinburgh, beneath a Sicilian marble slab carved by John Hutchison.

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables. The list of Previous Notables and Upcoming Entries has grown so long that I will post this once a week on Saturdays now.

Previous Notables (Click to see the Blog):

George III George IV Georgiana Cavendish
William IV Lady Hester Stanhope Lady Caroline Lamb
Princess Charlotte Queen Charlotte Charles James Fox
Queen Adelaide Dorothea Jordan Jane Austen
Maria Fitzherbert Lord Byron John Keats
Princess Caroline Percy Bysshe Shelley Cassandra Austen
Edmund Kean Thomas Clarkson Sir John Moore
John Burgoyne William Wilberforce Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Sarah Siddons Josiah Wedgwood Emma Hamilton
Hannah More John Phillip Kemble John Jervis, Earl St. Vincent
Ann Hatton Stephen Kemble Mary Robinson
Harriet Mellon Zachary Macaulay George Elphinstone
Thomas Babington George Romney Mary Moser
Ozias Humphry William Hayley Daniel Mendoza
Edward Pellew Angelica Kauffman Sir William Hamilton
David Garrick Pownoll Bastard Pellew Charles Arbuthnot
William Upcott William Huskisson Dominic Serres
Sir George Barlow Scrope Davies Charles Francis Greville
George Stubbs Fanny Kemble Thomas Warton
William Mason Thomas Troubridge Charles Stanhope
Robert Fulke Greville Gentleman John Jackson Ann Radcliffe
Edward ‘Golden Ball’ Hughes John Opie Adam Walker
John Ireland Henry Pierrepoint Robert Stephenson
Mary Shelley Sir Joshua Reynolds Francis Place
Robert Harding Evans Lord Thomas Foley Francis Burdett
John Gale Jones George Parker Bidder Sir George Warren
Edward Eliot William Beechey Eva Marie Veigel
Hugh Percy-Northumberland Charles Philip Yorke Lord Palmerston
Samuel Romilly John Petty 2nd Marquess Lansdowne Henry Herbert Southey
Stapleton Cotton Colin Macaulay Amelia Opie
Sir James Hall Henry Thomas Colebrooke Maria Foote
Sir David Baird Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville Dr. Robert Gooch
William Baillie James Northcote Horatio Nelson
Henry Fuseli Home Riggs Popham John Playfair
Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice 3rd Marquess Lansdowne Thomas Douglas 5th Earl of Selkirk Frederick Gerald “Poodle” Byng
Henry Somerset, 7th Duke of Beaufort John Wolcot (Peter Pindar) Joseph John Gurney
Edward John Eliot Henry Perronet Briggs George Lionel Dawson-Damer
Thomas Foley Mark Robinson Charles Culling Smith
Francis Charles Seymour-Ingram, 3rd Marquess of Hertford Thomas Fowell Buxton Tyrone Power
Richard Cumberland William Philip Molyneux, 2nd Earl of Sefton Edward Law, 1st Baron Ellenborough
Jeffry Wyattville Henry Mildmay Nicholas Wood
Hester Thrale Catherine Hughes, Baroness de Calabrella Admiral Israel Pellew
William Wellesley Pole, 3rd Earl of Mornington Henry Moyes Charles Fitzroy
Lord Granville Somerset Lumley St. George Skeffington William Playfair
John Lade Astley Cooper Matthew Gregory Lewis
Edward Pease Thomas Coutts John Urpeth Rastrick
Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond Captain William Baillie John Pitt Kennedy
Henry Cline Sarah Clementina Drummond-Burrell Samuel Wyatt
Lord George Lennox George Bussy Villiers Henry FitzRoy 5th Duke of Grafton
John Bell (Surgeon) Robert Smirke (Painter) John Kennedy (Manufacturer)
John Gell Dugald Stewart Louisa Gurney Hoare
William Nicol (Surgeon) William Nicol (Geologist) Edward Hall Alderson
Thomas Hope Richard Cosway Jonathan Backhouse
Lady Sarah Lennox John Byng, 5th Viscount Torrington Harriette Wilson
Andrew Plimer George Henry Borrow Charles Lamb
Henry Somerset, 5th Duke of Beaufort Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst Skeffington Lutwidge
George Colman the Elder William Hotham Jacob Bell
Charles Heathcote Tatham William Allen (Quaker) John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute
John Henry Manners, 5th Duke of Rutland William Gell Richard Barry, 7th Earl Barrymore
Samuel Bagster the Younger Lady Anne (Wesley) Fitzroy Samuel Gurney
John Liston Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond Luke Howard
Alexander MacKenzie (Explorer) John Pasco Joseph Black
Sir Robert Calder Benjamin Travers John Walker (Cricketer)
John (Johnnie) Walker Joseph Fox the Younger Bishop Beilby Porteus
Sir William Knighton George Rose Edward St. Maur 11th Duke of Somerset
Samuel Bagster the Elder Richard Keppel Craven Edwin Henry Landseer
James Paull (Duelist) Henry Thornton Peter Pond
George Rose (Barrister) William Vincent Humphry Repton
Eliab Harvey Sir George Henry Rose James Kenney
James Kennedy Nevil Maskelyne James Playfair
John Auldjo Thomas Morton (Shipbuilder) Charles Kemble
Sir John Vaughan (Judge) Henry Paget, Marquess of Anglesey Henry Holland (Cricketer)
Sir Henry Holland (Baronet) Mary Alcock Tom Walker (Cricketer)
Thomas Bradley (Physician) Henry Dundas Trotter Thomas Picton
Sir Charles Middleton William Henry Playfair John Palmer (The 2 Architects)
William Ludlam Thomas Ludlam John Pinch the Elder
George Harris, 1st Baron Edward Waring William Aubrey de Vere Beauclerk 9th Duke of St Albans
Isaac Milner Sir Henry Blackwood William Lovett
General Sir Edward Paget Colonel John Vaughan William Locker
William George Keith Elphinstone Sir William Parker Baronet of Harburn Charles Hutton
John Thomas ‘Antiquity’ Smith Thomas Grey Egerton

1st Earl of Wilton

William Allen (Royal Navy Officer)
Thomas Baldwin Nathaniel Plimer Sir Edward Berry
Charles Gordon Lennox 5th Duke of Richmond George Combe Henry Siddons
Angela Burdett-Coutts William Ellis (Painter) William Drummond of Logiealmond
William George Harris Gerrard Andrewes Berkeley Paget
John Palmer (postal Innovator) Thomas Ludlam Henry Hetherington
Sir Charles Bagot Edward Ellice Francis Douce
Sir Hector Munro Richard Harris Barham Andrew Meikle
William Anderson (Artist) William Hunter Cavendish 5th Duke of Devonshire William Stewart Rose
Harriet Murray John Hunter (Politician) John Thomas Serres
Joseph Antonio Emidy Joseph Hume Thomas Holcroft
Archibald Alison Abraham Rees Thomas Helmore
Colonel William Berkeley Thomas Hearne Richard Carlile
Julius Caesar Ibbetson George Howard, 6th Earl of Carlisle John Rennie
William Oxberry William Hornby William Holme Twentyman
Charles Howard 11th Duke of Norfolk Gerard Lake Sir Archibald Alison, 1st Baronet
Isaac Taylor Edward Howard-Gibbon Marquess of Stafford Granville Leveson-Gower
Robert Aspland George Harris 3rd Baron Harris Thomas Telford
George Phillip Manners Arthur Hill, 3rd Marquess of Downshire Daniel Gurney
Sir Peter Parker John Horsley Palmer Richard Watson (politician)
Joseph Farington Charles Fitzroy, Baron Southampton William Henry West Betty
Charles Stuart (British Army Officer) Marguerite Gardiner, Countess of Blessington Paul III Anton, Prince Esterházy
William Danby George Macartney Richard Payne Knight
Admiral Adam Duncan James George Smith Neill Sir Anthony Carlisle
John Hely-Hutchinson, 2nd Earl of Donoughmore Admiral Lord Hugh Seymour Richard Robert Madden
Joseph Milner Sidney Smith (wit) George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer
Henry Duncan John Nichols Thom Charles Gardiner, 1st Earl of Blessington
Uvedale Price James Foster Richard Colt Hoare
Richard Watson (Bishop) Francis Ingram-Seymour-Conway 2nd Marquess of Hertford Charles FitzRoy 3rd Baron Southampton
Duke of York Frederick Augustus Hanover Price Blackwood Benjamin Outram
Major General John Dalling John Thelwall Robert “Bobus” Percy Smith
John Carr (architect) James Archibald Stuart Roger Curtis
Sir Erasmus Gower Charles Pepys Earl of Cottenham Joseph Chitty
Henry Thoby Prinsep James Coutts Crawford Sir Charles Edward Grey
John Palmer (Commissary) Samuel Barrington William Gifford
John Richardson Henry Holland Thomas Harley
Emily Lennox, Duchess of Leinster Alexander Hood Charles Grey, 1st Earl Grey
John Wilson Croker Beaumont Hotham John Fane 11th Earl of Westmorland
George Johnston Henry Temple 2nd Viscount Palmerston Simon McGillivray
Colonel George Hanger Sir John McMahon William Babington
John Hoppner Sir Richard Onslow John Byng 1st Earl of Strafford
William Wilkins Daines Barrington John Bell (publisher)
Alexander Ball Lord Robert Seymour Jacob Philipp Hackert
John Cleave Hussey Vivian 1st Baron Vivian George Cowper 6th Earl Cowper
Edward Bouverie Pusey Dr William Pulteney Alison William Railton
James Mill Lucuis Curtis Henry Pigot
Hugh James Rose Sir John Easthope Thomas Starkie
John Prinsep Harriet Martineau Edward Gibbon
Richard Watson 4th Duke of Queensberry William Douglas Edward Jenner
James Gillray Molyneux Shuldham 1st Baron Shuldham Charles Catton the Younger
Henry Proctor (British Army Officer) James Stuart-Wortley-Mackenzie 1st Baron Wharncliffe Sir Thomas Brisbane
William Adam of Blair Adam Sir Edward Michael Pakenham Charles Bury 1st Earl of Charleville
John Pinch the Younger John Stuart Count of Maida Robert Hall
Hurrell Froude Olivia Serres Anne Horton Duchess of Cumberland and Strathearn
Sir Marc Brunel George Pryme General Sir John Bell
William Whewell Adam Ferguson of Raith William Beatty
Robert Linzee Richard Porson Edward O’Bryen
William Baillie (artist) John Romilly Edwin Chadwick
William Hay 17th Earl of Erroll Elizabeth Inchbald Maria Walpole
Edward Maltby Folliott Cornewall Edward James Eliot
James Perry (journalist) John Oxley General Sir Robert Arbuthnot
Sir Ralph Abercromby Hannah Cowley Thomas Kidd (classical scholar)
Admiral Sir Graham Moore Duke of Norfolk Henry Charles Howard Henry Dundas 1st Viscount Melville
Francis Leggatt Chantrey Sir Josias Rowley 1st Baronet Richard Grosvenor 1st Earl Grosvenor
Richard Colley Wellesley Edward Adolphus Seymour 12th Duke of Somerset James Henry Monk
Sir John Abercromby Sir George Colebrooke Francis Russell 5th Duke of Bedford
James Burton Thomas Morton (Playwright) John MacBride
George Mudie Sir William Hotham Charles Augustus Murray
Priscilla Fane Countess of Westmorland William Van Mildert Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Sir Gerard Noel 2nd Baronet Sir George Baker Henry Wellesley
William Gregory Albemarle Bertie John Rylands
Sir Arthur Paget George Murray 5th Earl of Dunmore Sir Thomas Munro 1st Baronet
Maurice Margarot Sir Charles Grey Robert James Carr
George Stephenson Bernard Edward Howard, 12th Duke of Norfolk Allan Cunningham
Henry Thynne 3rd Marquess of Bath William Hasledine Pepys George Percy 5th Duke of Northumberland
John Charles Ramsden Thomas Mounsey Cunningham John Nash
Thomas Charles Hope Joseph Gerrald Richard Howe 1st Earl Howe
William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck 3rd Duke of Portland William Pitt the Younger Henry Addington 1st Viscount Sidmouth
William Wyndham Grenville 1st Baron Grenville Spencer Perceval Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool
George Canning Frederick John Robinson 1st Viscount Goderich Arthur Wellesley 1st Duke of Wellington (Political Career)
Charles Grey 2nd Earl Grey William Lamb 2nd Viscount Melbourne Sir Robert Peel 2nd Baronet
Edward Troughton James Cecil 1st Marquess of Salisbury William Salter (artist)
Colonel Sempronius Streton James Lackington Duke of Argyll John Campbell 7th Duke
Charles Noel 1st Earl of Gainsborough Thomas Fortescue Kennedy Robert McQueen
Peregrine Maitland Harriet Fane Arbuthnot Duke of Marlborough George Spencer-Churchill 4th Duke
William Essington Richard Sheepshanks John Linnell
Daniel Rutherford Harry Walker (Cricketer) Thomas Egerton 2nd Earl of Wilton
William Heberden the Younger William Beresford 1st Baron Decies George Agar-Ellis 1st Baron Dover
Tattersalls Robert Jocelyn 3rd Earl of Roden George Stewart 8th Earl of Galloway
George FitzRoy 4th Duke of Grafton Lord Henry John Spencer Richard Grosvenor 2nd Marquess of Westminster
Admiral Sir George Campbell John Fane 10th Earl of Westmorland Phillip Parker King
Admiral Sir Robert Barlow Lady Diana Spencer James Edwards (Bookseller)
Charles Bennet 4th Earl of Tankerville Patrick Fraser Tytler William Handcock 1st Viscount Castlemaine
Lord Frederick Campbell George Leveson-Gower Marquis of Stafford Duke of Sutherland John Scott Earl of Eldon
John Blaquiere 1st Baron de Blaquiere Louisa (Lennox) Conolly Sir Harry Smith
Sir William Hamilton, 9th Baronet Sir Edward Crofton Laura Pulteney 1st Countess of Bath
Brownlow Bertie 5th Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven William Nelson 1st Earl Nelson George Child Villiers 5th Earl of Jersey
Frederick Howard 5th Earl of Carlisle Sir William Oglander 6th Baronet Joseph Bramah
George Cavendish 1st Earl of Burlington George Beresford 1st Marquess of Waterford William Henry Hunt
John Edwards-Vaughan Elizabeth (Gurney) Fry William Waldegrave 1st Baron Radstockv
George Gordon 9th Marquess Huntly William Mulready George Colman the Younger
Ralph Payne 1st Baron Lavington 5th Duke of Argyll John Campbell Charles Grant 1st Baron Glenelg
James Hutton George Byng 6th Viscount Torrington John Russell 6th Duke of Bedford
Sir Philip Durham Frederick Richard Lee Thomas Jervis
William Molesworth 8th Baronet William Cunnington William Beloe
Thomas Postlethwaite Edward Ellice Lady Charlotte Bury
John Adey Repton Sir Hugh Gough Henry Maudslay
Edward Bromhead Lord Charles FitzRoy (Politician) John Horne Tooke
Samuel Whitbread Sir Issac Coffin Matthew Boulton
Joshua Field William McGillivray Andrew Geddes
Edward Turner (chemist) George Lackington Francis Augustus Collier
Henry Beauchamp St John 13th Baron St John of Blesto Richard Taylor (editor) Henry Luttrell 2nd Earl of Carhampton
Derwent Coleridge Severus William Lynam Stretton William Vane 1st Duke of Cleveland
William Cobbett Arthur Phillip Major-General Robert Craufurd
Captain John (Jack) Willett Payne James Gregory George Peacock
Duke of Argyll George William Campbell 6th Duke

There will be many other notables coming, a full and changing list can be found here on the blog as I keep adding to it. The list so far is:

  • Victoria
  • Granville Sharp
  • William Paley
  • John Boydell
  • Viscount Robert Castlereagh
  • James Stirling
  • John MacBride (professor)
  • John Thomas Duckworth
  • David Dundas
  • Sir Hyde Parker
  • Sir Thomas Hardy
  • Thomas Hardy (Reformer)
  • Sir William Parker
  • William Cornwallis
  • Charles Cornwallis
  • Robert Emmet
  • William Taylor of Norwich
  • Sir John Herschel
  • Robert Owen
  • Jeremy Bentham
  • John Stuart Mill
  • Thomas Cochrane 10th Earl of Dundonald
  • Claire Clairmont
  • Fanny Imlay
  • Gilbert Imlay
  • William Godwin
  • William Hazlitt
  • Mary Wollstonecraft
  • James Edward Smith
  • Sir Joseph Banks
  • James Smithson
  • William Cowper
  • Wellington (the Military man)
  • Cuthbert Collingwood
  • Sydney Smith
  • Admiral Sir William Sydney Smith
  • Admiral Sir Joseph Sydney Yorke
  • William Howe
  • Viscount Sir Samuel Hood
  • Sir Samuel Hood
  • Thomas Babington Macaulay
  • Napoleon Bonaparte
  • General Banastre Tarleton
  • John Constable
  • Thomas Lawrence
  • Sir William Lawrence 1st Baronet
  • George Cruikshank
  • Thomas Gainsborough
  • Joseph Priestley
  • Horace Walpole
  • Thomas Rowlandson
  • William Blake
  • Joseph Locke
  • John Soane
  • Robert Smirke (architect)
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Robert Southey
  • Sir Walter Scott
  • Lord Elgin
  • William Windham
  • Madame de Stael
  • John Walker (inventor)(Natural Historian)(Lexicographer)
  • James Boswell
  • William Harrison Ainsworth
  • Thomas Cochrane
  • Warren Hastings
  • Edmund Burke
  • William Petty
  • Juana Maria de Los Dolores de Leon (Lady Smith)
  • Louis Philippe Joseph, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1785 as Duc d’ Orleans (1747-1793)
  • Louis Philippe, Duc de Chartres, acceded 1793 as Duc d’ Orleans (1773-1850)
  • John Bell
  • James Wyatt
  • William Pole-Tylney-Long-Wellesley
  • Lord FitzRoy Somerset, 1st Baron Raglan
  • Robert Smith, 1st Baron Carrington
  • James Watt
  • John Hunter (Royal Navy)
  • Joseph Pease
  • Richard Trevithick
  • Thomas Baillie (Royal Navy officer)
  • William Francis Patrick Napier
  • Charles James Napier
  • Sir Charles Bell
  • Donald Gregory
  • Richard Barnwell
  • Charles James Blomfield
  • William Carr Beresford 1st Viscount Beresford
  • Maria Hadfield
  • John Russell, 1st Earl Russell
  • George Brydges Rodney
  • Samuel Pepys Cockerell
  • Benjamin Robert Haydon
  • John Dalton
  • Joseph Lancaster
  • Samuel Whitbread (Politician)
  • Francis Augustus Collier
  • Humphry Davy
  • George Shillibeer
  • Samuel Hoare Jr.
  • Thomas Moore
  • Edward Dodwell
  • Archibald Norman McLeod
  • George Vancouver
  • Sir George Simpson
  • William Morgan (actuary)
  • Alexander Walker
  • George Templer
  • Thomas Landseer
  • Sir Robert Inglis
  • Lucia Elizabeth Vestris
  • John Vaughan 3rd Earl of Lisburne
  • Samuel Rogers
  • Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • John MacDonald of Garth
  • Sir Archibald Campbell
  • Maria Theresa Kemble
  • Thomas Muir of Huntershill
  • Thomas Fyshe Palmer
  • Samuel Palmer
  • William Skirving
  • Captain William Paget
  • Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Paget
  • E.A. Burney
  • Charles Burney
  • Lord Frederick Beauclerk
  • William Fullarton
  • Francis Jeffrey
  • Charles Simeon
  • Sir John Simeon
  • Thomas de Quincey
  • James Watson
  • Daniel O’Connell
  • Feargus O’Connor
  • Joseph Nollekens
  • Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster
  • Andrew Combe
  • Abram Combe
  • William Ellis
  • William A. F. Browne
  • Robert William Elliston
  • William Henry Murray
  • Daniel Terry
  • Joanna Baillie
  • Theodore Hook
  • Robert Scott Lauder
  • Chauncey Hare Townshend
  • Paul Sandby
  • Henry Paget 1st Earl of Uxbridge
  • Richard Hurd
  • Abel Heywood
  • George Holyoake
  • Charles Poulett Thomson
  • William Charles Keppel, 4th Earl of Albemarle
  • Thomas Coke, 1st Earl of Leicester
  • George Rennie
  • Elizabeth Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire
  • Frederick Hervey
  • Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Earl Granville
  • Sir Augustus William James Clifford
  • George Lamb (politician and Writer)
  • Francis Baring
  • Thomas Rees
  • John Jones
  • Sir James Edward Smith
  • John Evans
  • Maurice Berkeley, 1st Baron FitzHardinge
  • Henry FitzHardinge Berkeley
  • Grantley Berkeley
  • Craven Berkeley
  • George Cranfield-Berkeley
  • Sir George Beaumont, 7th Baronet
  • Joseph Mallord William Turner
  • Thomas Girtin
  • Dr. Thomas Monro
  • George Dance the Younger
  • William Daniell
  • Edward Thomas Daniell
  • Henry Monro
  • Henry Hunt
  • William Hone
  • James Wilson
  • Robert Taylor (Radical)
  • Benjamin West
  • John Varley
  • William Roscoe
  • Thomas Harrison (architect)
  • John Rennie the Younger
  • Sir Samuel Bentham
  • Thomas John Dibdin
  • Thomas Frognall Dibdin
  • George Soane
  • John Emery (English Actor)
  • Elizabeth Rebecca Edwin
  • Lawrence Holme Twentyman
  • Mary Ann Gibbon
  • Matthew Howard-Gibbon
  • Sir William Woods
  • Robert Scott Lauder
  • Isaac Taylor of Ongar
  • Josiah Conder
  • Jacob Rey
  • John Foster
  • Olinthus Gilbert Gregory
  • Jane Taylor
  • John Wilson (Scottish writer)
  • Sir James Stephens
  • Ann Taylor (poet)
  • John Eyre
  • Thomas Noon Talfourd
  • Thomas Southwood Smith
  • Neil Arnott
  • James Kay-Shuttleworth
  • William Johnson Fox
  • Nassau William Senior
  • Elizabeth Fox, Baroness Holland
  • Walter Wilson
  • William James Erasmus Wilson
  • Sir William Pulteney, 5th Baronet
  • William Jessop
  • Thomas Campbell
  • Phillip Hardwick
  • Charles Harcourt Masters
  • Sir Peter Parker, 2nd Baronet
  • Thomas Taylour, 1st Marquess of Headfort
  • George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer
  • John Home
  • Frederick Edward Jones
  • John Stuart, 1st Marquess of Bute
  • William Stuart
  • Lady Louisa Stuart
  • James Lowther 1st Earl of Lonsdale
  • Charles Stuart, 1st Baron Stuart de Rothesay
  • Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 1st Earl of Minto
  • Andrew Blayney, 11th Baron Blayney
  • Walter Savage Landor
  • Sir George Staunton
  • William Gilpin
  • Henry Trollope
  • Henry Havelock
  • Nicholas Carlisle
  • William Nicholson
  • Sir George Seymour
  • Miles Atkinson
  • William Dealtry
  • Samuel Marsden
  • Thomas Perronet Thompson
  • Alexander Horn
  • John Ryland
  • James Mackintosh
  • Sir Richard Bickerton
  • Robert Corbet
  • Richard Cope (minister)
  • William Wordsworth
  • Elizabeth Barrett Browning
  • William Lyttelton
  • Francis Nicholson
  • Geroge Hay, 8th Marquess of Tweeddale
  • James Anderson of Hermiston
  • John Hookham Frere
  • Henry Vassall-Fox
  • George Richardson (Architect)
  • William Chambers (Architect)
  • James Stuart-Mackenzie
  • William Legge
  • George Cartwright
  • Anthony James Pye Molloy
  • James Gambier 1st Baron Gambier
  • William Wingfield
  • James Prinsep
  • Francis Rawdon-Hastings, 1st Marquess of Hastings
  • Sir Charles Knowles
  • William Bligh
  • Sophia Campbell (Palmer)
  • Robert Campbell
  • Francis Grose
  • John Macarthur
  • George Ellis
  • John Gibson Lockhart
  • William Stevens
  • William Adam
  • John Thomas Troy
  • Sir Robert Dallas
  • Thomas Hardwick
  • Esther Abrahams
  • William Paterson (explorer)
  • Joseph Foveaux
  • Henry Fulton
  • Simon McTavish
  • Colin Robertson
  • William McMahon
  • William Behnes
  • Rowland Hill 1st Viscount Hill
  • John Peter Gandy
  • William Crotch
  • Samuel Wesley
  • Henry Vincent
  • William Cathcart, 1st Earl Cathcart
  • Thomas de Grey, 2nd Earl de Grey
  • John Henry Newman
  • John Keble
  • Sir William Molesworth 8th Baronet
  • Samuel Pym
  • Henry Lambert
  • Nesbit Willoughby
  • William Palmer
  • William Innell Clement
  • Henry John Rose
  • John Austin (legal philosopher)
  • Thomas Dunham Whitaker
  • Adam Clarke
  • Marchioness of Hertford, Maria Emilia Fagnani
  • Charles Douglas, 6th Marquess of Queensberry
  • Francis Douglas, 8th Earl of Wemyss
  • Edward Thurlow 1st Baron Thurlow
  • Sir George Prevost
  • Sir Isaac Brock
  • John Thomas Bigge
  • John Creighton 1st Earl Erne
  • Dr. Robert Wardell
  • James Dunlop
  • Admiral Sir Charles Adam
  • Catherine Wellesley Duchess of Wellington
  • Robert Ross
  • Henry Prittie 1st Baron Dunalley
  • Henry Prittie 2nd Baron Dunalley
  • Robert Cuninghame 1st Baron Rossmore
  • Sir Sames Craig
  • Henry Edward Fox
  • Hudson Lowe
  • John Clayton
  • Samuel Horsley
  • James Wilmot
  • Samuel Hood Linzee
  • John Gore
  • George Atwood
  • Stephen Weston (antiquary)
  • Walter Whiter
  • Joseph Robertson
  • Samuel Parr
  • Joseph Goodall
  • Gilbert Wakefield
  • Robert Mann (Royal Navy Officer)
  • William Otter
  • Joseph Warton
  • George Pretyman Tomline
  • William Enfield
  • Henry Bathurst (bishop)
  • William Turner (Unitarian minister)
  • Edward Craggs-Eliot 1st Baron Eliot
  • John Eliot Earl of St. Germans
  • Alexander Abercromby
  • Geroge Abercromby, 2nd Baron Abercromby
  • James Abercromby, 1st Baron Dunfermline
  • Alexander Abercromby (British Army Officer)
  • Robert Merry
  • John Moore (physician)
  • Sir Richard Hughes
  • William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland
  • John Raphael Smith
  • Daniel Asher Alexander
  • Henry Weekes
  • Thomas Stothard
  • Charles Manners-Sutton
  • Sir Richard Westmacott
  • Decimus Burton
  • James Pennethorne
  • James Haliburton
  • Joseph George Holman
  • Hugh Palliser
  • Thomas Louis
  • Willoughby Thomas Lake
  • Henry Hotham
  • John Holloway
  • Sir Richard Strachan
  • Edward Thornbrough
  • Benjamin Hawes
  • Charles Wetherell
  • John Scott Russell
  • William Horsley
  • Henry Noel, 6th Earl of Gainsborough
  • James Harris 1st Earl of Malmesbury
  • Henry Richard Charles Wellesley 1st Earl of Cowley
  • William O’Bryen Drury
  • Sir John Borlase Warren
  • John Parker 1st Earl of Morley
  • John Murray 4th Earl of Dunmore
  • Alexander Murray 6th Earl of Dunmore
  • John Munro 9th of Teaninich
  • John Wilkes
  • Henry George Grey 3rd Earl Grey
  • John Lambton 1st Earl of Durham
  • Matthew Murray
  • William Losh
  • John Vaughan
  • John Metcalf
  • Henry Both
  • James Hogg
  • Allan Cunningham (botanist)
  • Peter Miller Cunningham
  • Robert Hartley Cromek
  • Sir David Wilkie
  • Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath
  • William Feilding, 7th Earl of Denbigh
  • Algernon Percy, 1st Earl Beverly
  • Josceline Percy (Royal Navy Officer)
  • William Henry Percy
  • Thomas Dundas 1st Baron Dundas
  • William Fitzwilliam 4th Earl Fitzwilliam
  • Augustus Charles Pugin
  • Frederick Crace
  • James Morgan
  • Edward Blore
  • Alexander Monro
  • Joseph Galloway
  • Richard Curzon-Howe
  • Stephen Groombridge
  • William Simms
  • Sir James South
  • George Nugent 1st Marquess of Westmeath
  • James Gascoyne-Cecil 2nd Marquess of Salisbury
  • Sir Frederic Adam
  • Sir Henry Askew
  • Sir Andrew Francis Barnard
  • Sir Henry Wyndham
  • William Stretton
  • Eyre Massey
  • Richard Handcock 2nd Baron Castlemaine
  • John Flaxman
  • Sir George Grey 1st Baronet
  • Hugh Cloberry Christian
  • Henry Harvey
  • William Young
  • Andrew Snape Douglas
  • George Burlton
  • Sir John Hill
  • Sir Henry Raeburn
  • Sir Colin Campbell/Cailean Mor
  • Henry Fane
  • Lord Charles Spencer
  • Lady Elizabeth Spencer
  • Henry Ellis 2nd Viscount Clifden
  • Edward Nares
  • Cropley Ashley-Cooper 6th Earl of Shaftesbury
  • Lord Francis Almeric Spencer
  • George Biddell Airy
  • Charles Babbage
  • Richard Whately
  • Thomas Carlyle
  • Robert Grosvenor, 1st Baron Ebury
  • Edward Smith-Stanley, 12th Earl of Derby
  • William Heberden the Elder
  • Marcus Beresford
  • John Julius Angerstein
  • Charles Pierrepont, 1st Earl Manvers
  • Robert Jocelyn, 2nd Earl of Roden
  • John Stewart 7th Earl of Galloway
  • William Stewart (1774-1827)
  • William Porden
  • William Burn
  • Sarah Fane, Countess of Westmorland
  • John Ponsonby 4th Earl of Bessborough
  • Philip Gidley King
  • Anna Josepha King
  • Matthew Flinders
  • John Septimus Roe
  • Vice-Admiral Robert FitzRoy
  • Charles Darwin
  • Emma Crewe
  • Elizabeth Templetown
  • Ricahrd Gough (antiquarian)
  • Henry Grey Bennet
  • James Tytler
  • Alexander Fraser Tytler
  • George Thomson
  • William Power Keating Trench 1st Earl of Clancarty
  • George Townshend 1st marquess Townshend
  • John Campbell 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane
  • Elilzabeth Leveson-Gower Duchess of Sutherland
  • Nathan Rothschild
  • Charles Cavendish Fulke Greville
  • Patrick Sellar
  • Francis (Leveson-Gower) Egerton 1st Earl of Ellesmere
  • William Scott 1st Baron Stowell
  • Thomas Erskine 1st Baron Erskine
  • Thomas Thynne 1st Marquess of Bath
  • Thomas Conolly
  • Edward Michael (Pakenham) Conolly
  • Benjamin D’Urban
  • Robert Hamilton (ecnomist)
  • Thomas Hamilton (writer)
  • Augustus De Morgan
  • Sir James Pulteney 7th Baronet
  • Sir Richard Sutton
  • Thomas Colyear 4th Earl of Portmore
  • Albemarle Bertie 9th Earl of Lindsey
  • Thomas Nelson 2nd Earl Nelson
  • Charlotte Hood 3rd Duchess of Bronte
  • Francis Villiers Countess of Jersey
  • John Campbell 1st Baron Cawdor
  • Henry Howard (priest)
  • Joseph Clement
  • Arthur Woolf
  • Charles Monck 1st Viscount Monck
  • Henry Beresford 2nd Marquess of Waterford
  • Lord John Beresford
  • Sir John Beresford 1st Baronet
  • Lord George Thomas Beresford
  • Denis Pack
  • John Gurney
  • Joseph Fry(tea merchant)
  • Stephen Grellet
  • John James Waldegrave 6th Earl Waldegrave
  • Charles Gordon 10th Marquess of Huntly
  • Charles Compton Cavendish 1st Baron Chesham
  • Lord Frederick Gordon-Hallyburton
  • Richard Monckton Milnes 1st Baron Houghton
  • Elizabeth Gunning, 1 Baroness of Hamilton of Hameldon
  • Charles Grant (British East India Company)
  • Sir Robert Grant
  • Charles Lyell
  • Richard Kirwan
  • William Charles Wells
  • Patrick Matthew
  • Major-General Lord George Russell
  • Martha Bruce Countess of Elgin and Kincardine
  • William Brown
  • William Lechmere
  • Thomas Lee
  • Thomas Sidney Cooper
  • George Hamilton-Gordon 4th Earl of Aberdeen
  • William Ewart Gladstone
  • Charles Buller
  • George Grote
  • John Arthur Roebuck
  • John Roebuck
  • Thomas Dampier
  • Samuel Butler
  • George Edmund Byron Bettesworth
  • Eliza Courtney
  • General Robert Ellice
  • George Sackville-West 5th Earl De la Warr
  • John Britton (antiquary)
  • Henry Hardinge 1st Viscount Hardinge
  • James Nasmyth
  • Jesse Ramsden
  • Sir Joseph Whitworth
  • John Penn
  • Richard Roberts
  • David Napier
  • George Green
  • Charles Augustus FitzRoy
  • Richard Beadon
  • Lloyd Kenyon
  • John Wheble
  • William Tooke
  • Richard Grenville-Temple 2nd Earl Temple
  • George Montagu
  • Sir Thomas Pasley
  • Sir Thomas Graves
  • Alexander Cochrane
  • Guy Carleton 1st Baron Dorchester
  • Phillip Cosby
  • James Wallace
  • Matthew Robinson Boulton
  • Francis Eginton
  • James Keir
  • John Wilkinson
  • Simon Goodrich
  • William Murdoch
  • William Fordyce Mavor
  • Edward Pelham Brenton
  • St Andrew St John 14th Baron St John of Blesto
  • John St John 12th Baron St John of Blesto
  • John Taylor (Unitarian hymn writer)
  • Alexander Tilloch
  • Jonathan Boucher
  • John Luttrell-Olmius 3rd Earl of Carhampton
  • W.M. Praed
  • John Moultrie
  • William Sidney Walker
  • Charles Austin
  • Charles Blomfield
  • Frederick Denison Maurice
  • Richard Arden 3rd Baron Alvanley
  • John Cartwright (political reformer)
  • Thomas Curson Hansard
  • William Benbow
  • Thomas Robert Malthus
  • John Claudius Loudon
  • Thomas Townshend 1st Viscount Sydney
  • John Montagu 5th Earl of Sandwich
  • Lachlan Macquarie
  • William Dawes
  • Watkin Tench
  • Charles Craufurd
  • John Whitelocke
  • James Shaw Kennedy
  • John Colborne, 1st Baron Seaton
  • Robert Henley 2nd Earl of Northington
  • Thomas Brown (philosopher)
  • George Gilbert Scott
  • George Villers 4th Earl of Jersey

The Dukes

  • Duke of Grafton, Augustus Henry FitzRoy, 3rd Duke 1735-1811
  • Duke of Gordon, Alexander Gordon 4th Duke 1743-1827
  • Duke of Northumberland, Hugh Percy 1742-1817
  • Duke of Northumberland, Algernon Percy 1792-1865
  • Duke of Hamilton, Archibald Hamilton
  • Duke of Hamilton, Alexander Hamilton
  • Duke of Norfolk, Henry Howard 13th Duke
  • Duke of Marlborough George Spencer-Churchill 5th Duke
  • Duke of Marlborough George Spencer-Churchill 6th Duke
  • Duke of Dorset John Sackville 3rd Duke
  • Duke of Dorset George Sackville 4th Duke
  • Duke of Atholl John Murray 4th Duke
  • Duke of Bridgewater Francis Egerton 3rd Duke
  • Duke of Sutherland George Sutherland-Leveson-Gower 2nd Duke
  • Duke of Gordon George Duncan Gordon 5th Duke
  • Duke of Montrose James Graham 3rd Duke
  • Duke of Bedford Francis Russell 7th Duke
  • Duke of Cleveland Henry Vane 2nd Duke
  • Duke of Cleveland William Vane 3rd Duke
  • Duke of Cleveland Harry Powlett 4th Duke
  • Duchess of Gordon Jane Gordon

The Royals

  • Ernest Augustus 1 of Hanover
  • Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld

The Dandy Club

  •         Beau Brummell
  •         William Arden, 2nd Baron Alvanley

Patronesses of Almacks

  •         Emily Lamb, Lady Cowper
  •         Amelia Stewart, Viscountess Castlereagh
  •         Sarah Villiers, Countess of Jersey
  •         Maria Molyneux, Countess of Sefton
  •         Dorothea Lieven, Countess de Lieven, wife of the Russian Ambassador
  •         Countess Esterhazy, wife of the Austrian Ambassador

Regency Business

  • The Morning Post
  • Rundell and Bridge
  • Lackington-Temple of Muses
  • Almack’s
  • Burlington Arcade

If there are any requests for personalities to be added to the list, just let us know in the comments section

Beggars Can’t Be Choosier Reviewed.

Beggars Can’t be Choosier BeggarsCover-2014-07-18-09-43.jpg was reviewed again today. Another fantastic Review and I hope you can go to this webpage The_Review_Group__Beggars_Can_t_be_Choosier_by_D_W_Wilkin_-_A_Review_by_Linda_Root_-2014-07-18-09-43.jpg to see it. I am even giving away a digital copy of Beggars to one of those who stop by and enters the drawing there.

The Review is a website that reviews Historical Novels and my book was selected to be reviewed by my not so near neighbor, Linda Root, who I met on the FaceBook various writing forums and then later found she lived on the other side of the mountain (about 1+ hours away). We have never met, but we might be the closest in distance of any other writer of the hundreds I have met. Linda writes Historicals and she chose to tackle Beggars. A genre that she hasn’t touched since college, and Linda has now been out of college long enough to have had a career and retire.

Her books include: 41SLBhKWBKL-2014-07-18-09-43.jpgMidwife’s Secret I: The mystery of the Hidden Princess and 51Ei-Ktwt7L-2014-07-18-09-43.jpg The First Marie and the Queen of Scots

Regency Personalities Series
In my attempts to provide us with the details of the Regency, today I continue with one of the many period notables.

Duke of Argyll George William Campbell
22 September 1768 – 22 October 1839

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George William Campbell

Argyll was the eldest son of John Campbell, 5th Duke of Argyll and his wife, Elizabeth Campbell, 1st Baroness Hamilton, daughter of Colonel John Gunning. He was known as Marquis of Lorn until his father’s death.

Argyll sat as Member of Parliament for St Germans from 1790 to 1796. In 1806 he succeeded his father in the dukedom and entered the House of Lords. He was Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of Scotland from 1827 to 1828 and again from 1830 and 1839.

In 1833 he was sworn of the Privy Council and appointed Lord Steward of the Household in the Whig administration headed by Lord Grey, a position he retained when Lord Melbourne became prime minister in July 1834. The Wgigs fell from power in November 1834 but returned to office already in April 1835, when Argyll once again became Lord Steward under Melbourne. He continued in the post until his death in 1839. Argyll was also Lord-Lieutenant of Argyllshire from 1799 to 1839.

Cromwell had damaged the ancient family seat of Castle Campbell that overlooked Dollar in Clackmannanshire. George sold the land and buildings. He was a member of the British Fishing Society, White’s Club and a loyal companion of Beau Brummell.

Argyll married Lady Caroline Elizabeth Villiers, daughter of George Villiers, 4th Earl of Jersey, at Edinburgh, on 29 November 1810. This was three weeks after she had divorced Henry Paget, Lord Uxbridge, the future Marquis of Anglesey. They had no children. He died in October 1839, aged 71 at the family estate Inveraray Castle, Argyllshire, and was buried on 10 November 1839 at Kilmun, Cowal. His brother, Lord John Campbell, succeeded to his titles.

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